Planta

Planta 136, 9 1 - 96 (1977)

9 by Springer-Verlag 1977

Transport of Exogenous Auxin in Two-branched Dwarf Pea Seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) Some Implications for Polarity and Apical Dominance D.A, Morris Department of Biology, Building 44, The University, Southampton S09 5NH, U.K.

Abstract. Dwarf pea plants bearing two cotyledonary shoots were obtained by removing the epicotyl shortly after germination, and the patterns of distribution of 14C in these plants was investigated following the application of [14C]IAA to the apex of one shoot. Basipetal transport to the root system occurred, but in none of the experiments was 14C ever detected in the unlabelled shoot even after transport periods of up to 48 h. This was true both of plants with two equal growing shoots and of plants in which one shoot had become correlatively inhibited by the other, and in the latter case applied whether the dominant or subordinate shoot was labelled. In contrast, when [14C]IAA was applied to a mature foliage leaf of one shoot transfer of ~4C to the other shoot took place, although the amount transported was always low. Transport of 14C from the apex of a subordinate shoot on plants bearing one growing and one inhibited shoot was severely restricted compared with the transport from the dominant shoot apex, and in some individual plants no transport at all was detected. Removal of the dominant shoot apex rapidly restored the capacity of the subordinate shoot to transport apically-applied [~4C]IAA, and at the same time led to rapid cambial development and secondary vascular differentiation in the previously inhibited shoot. Applications of 1% unlabelled IAA in lanolin to the decapitated dominant shoot maintained the inhibition of cambial development in the subordinate shoot and its reduced capacity for auxin transport. These results are discussed in relation to the polarity of auxin transport in intact plants and the mechanism of correlative inhibition. Key words: Apical dominance - Auxin transport Cambial development - P i s u m - Polarity. Abbreviations: IAA=Indol-3-yl-acetic acid; TIBA=2,3,5-triiodo-

benzoic acid; 2,4D = 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid ; IAAsp = Indol-3-yl-acetyl aspartic acid.

Introduction The polar transport of indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA) in tissue segments is a well-known and well-documented phenomenon. In stem, petiole, leaf and coleoptile segments the transport is basipetal, and in segments cut from roots acropetal (that is, towards the root tip). The characteristics of this polar transport have been the subject of a detailed review by Goldsmith (1969). In recent years there has been a re-awakening of interest in the problems of auxin transport in intact plants. By applying radioactively-labelled IAA as close as possible to the shoot apex of intact plants (the presumed site of endogenous auxin biosynthesis-Scott and Briggs, 1960) it has been shown that IAA is transported into the root system (Morris et al., 1969; Bonnemain, 1971; Bourbouloux et al., 1973; Bourbouloux and Bonnemain, 1974). The characteristics of this transport are satisfyingly similar to polar transport in cut segments: transport velocities are similar, usually in the range 10-15 mm h -~ at ca. 20 ~ C; the transport does not take place in mature phloem sieve tubes; it is probably specific for IAA and structurally related growth-active compounds and can be inhibited by 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4D); the transport requires metabolic energy and is strongly temperaturedependent in the range 5~ ~ C with a rather low temperature coefficient (Morris et al., 1969; Bonnemain, 1971 ; Hollis and Tepper, 1971 ; Morris and Kadir, 1972; Morris et al., 1973; Morris and Thomas, 1974; Eliezer and Morris, in preparation). How far the transport is typical of the transport of endogenous auxin remains to be established, although circumstantial evidence suggests that it is. The inhibition of transport by TIBA and other auxin analogues agrees with the known effects of such compounds on the release of axillary buds from domi-

92 n a n c e b y the s h o o t a p e x ( P a n i g r a h i a n d A u d u s , 1966), on the i n h i b i t i o n o f the a u x i n - d i r e c t e d t r a n s p o r t o f m e t a b o l i t e s t o w a r d s the s h o o t a p e x (Davies and W a r e i n g , 1965), a n d on the f o r m a t i o n o f reaction w o o d in a n g i o s p e r m s ( M o r e y a n d C r o n s h a w , 1968 a a n d b). R e c e n t m i c r o a u t o r a d i o g r a p h i c studies have shown t h a t the t r a n s p o r t o f e x o g e n o u s a u x i n in intact p l a n t s m a y t a k e p l a c e in the c a m b i u m a n d its part i a l l y - d i f f e r e n t i a t e d derivatives, p a r t i c u l a r l y differentiating s e c o n d a r y x y l e m vessels ( B o n n e m a i n , 1971; B o u r b o u l o u x a n d B o n n e m a i n , 1974; M o r r i s and T h o m a s , in p r e s s ) - e n d o g e n o u s a u x i n is k n o w n to be i n v o l v e d in the r e s u m p t i o n o f c a m b i a l activity following the t e r m i n a t i o n o f d o r m a n c y in d e c i d u o u s w o o d y species, in the f o r m a t i o n o f the v a s c u l a r c a m b i u m in several species, a n d in the r e g u l a t i o n o f the d i f f e r e n t i a t i o n o f s e c o n d a r y v a s c u l a r tissues ( W a r e i n g , 1958; W a r e i n g et al., 1964; L a r s o n , 1964). W h e t h e r o r n o t the t r a n s p o r t o f auxin f r o m the a p i c a l b u d o f the intact p l a n t t a k e s p l a c e b y a p o l a r t r a n s p o r t m e c h a n i s m similar to that o p e r a t i n g in isolated tissue segments is u n k n o w n , a n d clearly it would be difficult to d e m o n s t r a t e in an o r g a n in which the o n l y m o v e m e n t p o s s i b l e is in the d o w n w a r d direction. Nevertheless, i n f o r m a t i o n clarifying this p o i n t would be o f value in establishing the m e c h a n i s m o f auxin t r a n s p o r t in the w h o l e plant, as well as providing i n f o r m a t i o n useful in d e t e r m i n i n g the r o l e o f auxin t r a n s p o r t in such p o l a r processes as a p i c a l d o m i n a n c e , w o u n d r e g e n e r a t i o n a n d the f o r m a t i o n o f adventitious r o o t s on cuttings. In an a t t e m p t to investigate this p r o b l e m , the t r a n s p o r t o f a u x i n has been s t u d i e d in p e a seedlings in which the g r o w t h o f two e q u a l c o t y l e d o n a r y shoots was i n d u c e d b y excision o f the epicotyl after genraination (Snow, 1931, 1937; Sachs, 1966). It was argued t h a t if labelled I A A was a p p l i e d to the apical b u d o f one s h o o t o f such seedlings the s u b s e q u e n t movem e n t or otherwise o f label into the s e c o n d s h o o t a n d the c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f this m o v e m e n t (for e x a m p l e its velocity a n d sensitivity to specific auxin t r a n s p o r t inh i b i t o r s ) m i g h t p r o v i d e evidence for o r against the o p e r a t i o n o f an i n h e r e n t p o l a r auxin t r a n s p o r t mechanism in the intact plant. I n a p r o p o r t i o n o f the t w o - b r a n c h e d plants p r o d u c e d by r e m o v a l o f the epicotyl a b o v e the cotyled o n a r y n o d e one s h o o t m a y eventually o u t g r o w the s e c o n d s h o o t a n d c o r r e l a t i v e l y i n h i b i t it (Snow, 1937; Sachs, 1966). I n e x t r e m e cases the i n h i b i t e d shoot m a y e v e n t u a l l y senesce. I n h i b i t i o n o f g r o w t h a n d subsequent senescence m a y be p r e v e n t e d if the apex o f the d o m i n a n t s h o o t is r e m o v e d o r if the inhibited s h o o t is t r e a t e d with c y t o k i n i n s (Sachs, 1966). The o p p o r t u n i t y was t a k e n in the present experiments to c o m p a r e the t r a n s p o r t o f e x o g e n o u s auxin in d o m i -

D.A. Morris : Transport of IAA in Seedlings n a n t a n d s u b o r d i n a t e s h o o t s o f t w o - b r a n c h e d plants to d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r there was a n y c o r r e l a t i o n between the g r o w t h activity o f a s h o o t a n d its c a p a c i t y to t r a n s p o r t auxin.

Materials and Methods Production of Two-branched Plants

Seeds of P. sativum cv. Meteor were surface sterilized for 15 min in saturated sodium hypochlorite solution, rinsed overnight in running tap water and planted 2.5 cm deep in trays of vermiculite in a cool greenhouse. At varying times after soaking the germinating seeds were carefully removed from the trays and re-potted singly in 10 cm diam. pots of vermiculite after cutting off the epicotyl close to the cotyledons. In experiments where it was required to produce plants with two equal growing shoots the epicotyl was removed as soon as possible after germination had started, usually on day 3 or 4; in other experiments epicotyl excision was deliberately delayed for a few days in order to obtain plants with one dominant and one subordinate cotyledonary shoot, The re-potted plants were transferred to a growth room (21~ 1~ C; 15 klx; photoperiod 16 h) and watered daily with a complete Hoagland's mineral nutrient solution.

Application of [14C]IAA 3-indolyl[l-14C]acetic acid (specific activity 52 mCi mM - 1) was obtained as the dried ammonium salt from the Radiochemical Centre. Amersham, U.K. The compound was dissolved in distilled water containing 0.01% Tween 20 as a wetting agent, and was applied to the shoot apex as a 5 pl droplet (0.10 0.25 gCi; 0.33-0.84 gg IAA) between the stipules of a leaf still enclosed in the apical bud (see Morris et al., 1969). The ages of the plants used in the experiments varied from 20 days to 25 days after soaking. In one experimental series [~4C]IAA was applied as a 5 pl droplet to one leaflet of a fully-expanded foliage leaf.

Extraction of Plant Material

At the end of the chosen transport period the plants were removed from their pots and dissected into labelled apical bud or leaf, remainder of labelled shoot, unlabelled shoot and root system (including cotyledons) and extracted several times in cold (2~ C) 85% aqueous ethanol in darkness for a total period of 2 0 days. Extracts and washings were combined, made up to volume with ethanol, and aliquots counted on a Packard Model 3375 liquid scintillation spectrometer using a dioxan-based scintillation fluid. Counts obtained were corrected for background counts and for quenching.

Anatomical Studies

In one experiment the stem anatomy of dominant and subordinate shoots of plants bearing two unequal shoots was examined in freehand transverse sections of unfixed material lightly stained in Toluidine Blue and mounted in 50% aqueous glycerol. Sections were examined and photographed on a Zeiss photomicroscope.

D.A. Morris : Transport of IAA in Seedlings

93 Table 2. Distribution of radioactivity from [1 14C]IAA applied to a fully-expanded foliage leaf (leaf 2) of one shoot of dwarf pea seedlings having two equal growing cotyledonary shoots. Values shown are means of 5 plants per experiment. Plants were labelled 25 and 23 days after planting in Experiments 4 and 5 respectively

Results

Transport in Plants with Equal Growing Shoots Following the application o f [14C]IAA to the apical bud of one shoot on plants bearing two equal growing shoots no activity was ever detected in the unlabelled shoot up to 48 h after labelling (Table 1). In such plants the a m o u n t o f 1"C transported in the labelled shoot was similar to the a m o u n t transported in singlestemmed plants under c o m p a r a b l e conditions (e.g. see Morris and Kadir, 1972) and a considerable proportion of the transported activity accumulated in the r o o t system. W h e n [~4C]IAA was applied to a m a t u r e foliage leaf a m u c h greater p r o p o r t i o n of the applied activity was transported to the r o o t system a n d in every case a small a m o u n t of labelled material was detected in the unlabelled shoot (Table 2), al.though this never exceeded 1% of the total activity recovered. Both basipetal and acropetal transport of 4C in the stem occurred following foliar applications confirming that this transport was not polar.

Experiment

4

5

Transport period (h)

6.0

7.0

Labelled leaf Shoot above fed leaf Shoot below fed leaf Unlabelled shoot Root system

251,240 17,092 24,281 2,558 116,565

47,182.7 2,523.0 3,480.0 155.5 23,186.4

Total dpm recovered

411,736

76,527.6

Recovery (%) Total transport (% of recovered) Transport to roots (% of recovered) Unlabelled shoot (% of recovered)

78.2 39.0 28.3 0.6

48.8 38.3 30.3 0.2

Radioactivity (dpm. plant-1)

Sachs (1966) observed that removal of the dominant shoot f r o m t w o - b r a n c h e d plants resulted in the resumption of g r o w t h of the subordinate shoot and prevented its senescence. A n attempt was made to determine whether removal of the d o m i n a n t shoot apex might also restore the capacity o f the subordinate shoot to transport I A A . [14C]IAA was applied as before to the subordinate shoot apex of intact t w o - b r a n c h e d plants and to plants in which the apical region o f the d o m i n a n t shoot h a d been removed immediately below leaf 4 sixty-six h o u r s earlier. In half o f the decapitated plants the apical tissues of the d o m i n a n t shoot were replaced by a lanolin paste containing 1% unlabelled I A A .

Transport in Plants with Unequal Shoots W h e n [14C]IAA was applied to the d o m i n a n t shoot o f plants bearing one growing and one inhibited shoot the pattern o f transport observed was similar to that described for transport f r o m the labelled shoot of a plant bearing two equal branches (Table 3). In contrast, when [14C]IAA was applied to the subordinate shoot on such plants transport was considerably reduced c o m p a r e d with that f r o m the dominant shoot, and in some individual plants no transport out of the labelled apex was observed.

Table 1. Distribution of 14C following the application of [1-t~C]IAA to the apical bud of one shoot of dwarf pea seedlings having two equal growing cotyledonary shoots. Values shown are the means of five plants per experiment. Plant ages at labelling were 25, 20 and 22 days in Experiments 1, 2 and 3 respectively Experiment

1

2

3

Transport period (h)

6.0

6.0

6.5

24.0

48.0

Radioactivity (mean dpm. plant-1) Labelled apex Remainder of labelled shoot Unlabelled shoot Root system

77,964.5 590.2 0 2,290.0

250,938.0 3,134.4 0 1,580.9

105,669.0 1,367.0 0 1,823.8

92,424.2 755.5 0 3,303.2

93,573.0 945.0 0 4,241.3

Total dpm recovered

80,844.7

255,653.3

108,859.8

96,482.9

98,759.3

Recovery (%) Total transport (% of recovered) Transport to roots (% of recovered)

51.6 3.6 2.8

82.3 1.8 0.6

69.5 2.9 1.7

61.6 4.2 3.4

63.0 5.3 4,3

94

D.A. Morris: Transport of IAA in Seedlings

Table 3. Comparison of the transport of radioactivity from [1-14C]IAA applied to the apices of either dominant or subordinate shoots of two-branched dwarf pea seedlings possessing one growing and one inhibited cotyledonary shoot. Values are means of five plants per experiment. Plant ages at labelling were 25 and 22 days in Experiments 6 and 7 respectively Experiment

6

7

Transport period (b)

6.0

7.0

Shoot labelled

Dominant Inhibited Dominant Inhibited

Radioactivity (dpm. plant-1) Labelled apex 59,616 Remainder of labelled shoot 1,145 Unlabelled shoot 0 Root system 2,117

62,873

83,902

94,117

315 0 359

1,058 0 2,655

667 0 1,143

Total dpm recovered

62,878

63,547

87,615

95,927

Recovery (%) Total transport (% of recovered) Transport to roots (% of recovered)

80.2

81.1

55.9

61.2

5.2

1.1

4.2

1.9

3.4

0.6

3.0

1.2

Table 4. Effect of removal of the dominant shoot apex on the growth of the subordinate shoot of a two-branched dwarf pea seedling bearing one growing and one inhibited shoot. The apex was removed 74 h before measurements were taken. In one batch of plants the apex was replaced by 1% IAA in lanolin. Values given are means of five plants per treatment + standard error of mean

Dominant shoot

Subordinate shoot

Length (mm)

Number of leaves

Length (mm)

5.8_+0.20 3.0

41.0_+4.53 3,4-+0.24 60.0_+5.02 4,6_+0.24

3.0

4 7 . 5 _ + 4 . 8 73,8+0.25

Dominant shoot intact 86.4_+4.97 Apex removed ~ 48.6_+4.24 Apex replaced by IAA ~ 44.4-+2.72

Number of leaves

Apex of dominant shoot removed by cutting immediately below node 4

Removal of the dominant shoot apex resulted in the rapid resumption of growth in the subordinate shoot (Table 4) accompanied by a considerable increase in its capacity to transport [I~C]IAA applied to the apical bud (Table 5). Both these effects of apex removal were partially overcome by the application of unlabelled IAA to the decapitated dominant shoot. An examination of the anatomy of internode 3 of dominant and subordinate shoots from plants of the same age and condition as those used in the transport experiments revealed considerable differ-

Table 5. Influence of the dominant shoot apex on the transport

of [1-1~C]IAA applied to the apical bud of the subordinate shoot on two-branched pea seedlings bearing one growing and one inhibited cotyledonary shoot. Treatments were applied 66 h before the application of labelled IAA. Transport period allowed was 8.0 h Dominant shoot intact

Apex removed a

Apex replaced by 1% IAA a

Labelled apex Remainder of labelled shoot Unlabelled shoot Root system

101,713

100,923

108,623

633 0 320

2,755 0 2,049

1,125 0 2,213

Total dpm recovered

102,666

105,727

l 11,961

Recovery (%) Total transport (% of recovered) Transport to roots (% of recovered)

65.5

67.5

71.5

a

0.93

4.54

2.98

0,31

1.94

1.98

Apex of dominant shoot removed immediately below node 4

ences between them in the degree of secondary vascular differentiation which had occurred. In the dominant shoot there was a well-developed cambium (both fascicular and interfascicular) and an almost complete ring of secondary vascular elements (Fig. la). In the subordinate shoot the fascicular cambium was poorly developed, an interfascicular cambium had not differentiated and only a few small vessels had differentiated in the axial bundles (Fig. l b).

Discussion

In none of the experiments in which [*~C]IAA was applied to the apical bud of one shoot of a twobranched plant was label ever detected in the other shoot. This was true both of plants with two equal and growing shoots and of plants in which one shoot correlatively inhibited the other, and in the latter case applied whether the dominant or the subordinate shoot apex received the labelled IAA. In contrast transfer of 1r from one shoot to the other occurred when [14C]IAA was applied to a mature foliage leaf. Previous studies of exogenous auxin transport from mature leaves of intact plants have shown that this transport is qualitatively different from the transport of IAA from the apical bud and that it occurs in the phloem (Eschrich, 1968; Bonnemain, 1971; Morris and Kadir, 1972; Morris et al., 1973; Goldsmith et al., 1974). These results are consistent with the operation of a strictly polar transport of IAA from the apex

D.A. Morris : Transport of I A A in Seedlings

95

Fig. l a and b. Transverse sections through internode 3 of a dominant and b subordinate shoots of two-branched dwarf pea seedlings 20 days after removal of the epicotyl. (Both x 100). Note differences in the size of the axial bundles, the extent of the cambia and the degree of vascular differentiation which has occurred. Individual cells of the inhibited subordinate shoot are generally m u c h smaller than those of the dominant shoot

of the shoot system into the root, and an efficient system for preventing the migration of IAA from the polar transport system into the phloem in which acropetat transport into the unlabelled shoot of a two-branched plant could occur. The alternative possibility that tissues in the root system might act as a sink for all the IAA reaching it and that metabolism and/or immobilization o f l A A might reduce the availability of labelled IAA for re-export to the unlabelled shoot is less likely: although considerable metabolism of IAA may occur in the root system following its transport from the shoot apex, previous experiments have shown that an appreciable amount of free IAA may remain (Morris et al., 1969). That more IAA may reach the system than is immediately required in the regulation of growth and differentiation is suggested by the accumulation in the root of indol3yl-acetyl aspartic acid (IAAsp) which is generally regarded as a detoxification product or storage form of IAA (see Morris et al., 1969). Whatever the mechanism involved in the transfer of IAA from the shoot apex to the root system it seems that exchange of IAA between two shoots on the same plant does not occur. However, the results of experiments involving plants with two unequal shoot systems have indicated that the inhibition and eventual senescence of the subordinate shoot is regulated by auxin produced in the apex of the dominant shoot. Removal of the dominant shoot apex allows regrowth of the subordinate shoot, and the application of exogenous IAA to the decapitated dominant shoot at least partially restores the dominance of the latter (Sachs, t966; Table 4 above). Any effect of auxin produced in the dominant shoot on the growth of the subordinate shoot must therefore be indirect.

Sachs (1966) found that the application of 6-furfurylamino purine (kinetin) to the apex of the subordinate shoot prevented its senescence and overcame the correlative inhibition imposed by the dominant shoot. The situation in two-branched plants is therefore directly comparable to the correlative inhibition of axillary bud growth by the apex of the same shoot which is also mediated by auxin produced by the apical bud and which, also, can be overcome by direct application of kinetin to the inhibited axillary buds (Sachs and Thimann, 1964). The release of axillary buds and subordinate shoots from correlative inhibition following treatment with cytokinins has led to the suggestion that auxin produced by the dominant shoot apex may polarise the flow of cytokinins from the root system in such a way as to deprive the weaker bud or shoot of sufficient cytokinin to maintain its normal growth (Phillips, 1969). In support of this it has been found that labelled cytokinins applied to the root system of the pea and Solanum andigena L. are indeed diverted from the lateral buds towards regions of endogenous auxin synthesis or to auxin-treated regions of decapitated shoots (Morris and Winfield, 1972; Woolley and Wareing, 1972a and b). Snow (1937) observed that applications of IAA may protect one shoot of a two-branched pea plant from correlative inhibition by the second shoot, and Sachs and Thimann (1967) found that when lateral buds were released from apical dominance by cytokinin applications normal elongation of the resulting shoot only occurred if IAA was also applied to to the bud apices. It therefore seems that both IAA and cytokinins are required for normal shoot growth and that one role of IAA may be to maintain the directed transport of endogenous cytokinin towards the bud or shoot

96

once it has been released from dominance. The results presented in Table 3 indicate that the capacity of an inhibited shoot to transport IAA is greatly reduced compared with that of a growing shoot. Following the release of a subordinate shoot from correlative inhibition its capacity for auxin transport was rapidly restored (Table 5), and possibly also its capacity to synthesise endogenous auxin (Thimann and Skoog, 1934). The renewed synthesis and transport of auxin in a previously inhibited shoot released from dominance might operate to re-direct the transport of cytokinins towards its apex. The observed failure of auxin transported basipetally in one shoot to enter a second shoot on the same plant (Tables 1, 3 and 5) might explain the paradoxical observation that auxin produced in one shoot can indirectly inhibit the growth of a second shoot while at the same time applications of auxin to the second shoot will protect it from inhibition. If an auxin-directed transport of cytokinins is necessary to maintain shoot growth then both shoots on a two-branched plant would only continue to grow as long as both were producing and transporting a u x i n - a n y t h i n g which interfered with the synthesis or transport of IAA would lead to a reduced acropetal flow of cytokinin in the shoot and possibly to its eventual senescence. The able assistance of Mrs. R.P. Bell and Mr. B.A. Lockyer is gratefully acknowledged.

References

Bonnemain, J.L. : Transport et distribution des traceurs apr6s application de AIA-2-14C sur les feuilles de Viciafaba. C.R. Acad. Sci. (Paris) D 273, 1699-1702 (1971) Bourbouloux, A., Bonnemain, J.L.: Transport, distribution et m&abolisme de l'auxine dans la racine de Vicia faba L. apr~s application de [14C] IAA ou de [3H]IAA sur le bourgeon. Planta (Berl.) 119, 169 182 (1974) Bourbouloux, A., Bonnemain, J.L., Vasseur, J.: Caract6ristiques du transport dans la tige de l'auxine-[14C] en provenance de jennes feuilles de Vicia faba. C.R. Acad. Sci. (Paris) D 276, 501-504 (1973) Davies, C.R., Wareing, P.F.: Auxin-directed transport of radiophosphorus in stems. Planta (Berl.) 65, 139-156 (1965) Eschrich, W. : Translokation radioaktiv markierter indolyl-3-essigsfiure in Siebr6hren von Vicia faba. Planta (Berl.) 78, 144-157 (1968) Goldsmith, M.H.M.: Transport of plant growth regulators. In: Physiology of plant growth and development, pp. 127-162, Wilkins, M.B., ed. London:McGraw-Hill 1969 Goldsmith, M.H.M., Cataldo, D.A., Karn, J., Brenneman, T., Trip, P. : The rapid non-polar transport of auxin in the phloem of intact Coleus plants. Planta (Berl.) 116, 301-317 (1974)

D.A. Morris: Transport of IAA in Seedlings Hollis, C.A., Tepper, H.B. : Auxin transport within intact dormant and active white ash shoots. Plant Physiol. 48, 146-149 (1971) Larson, P.R. : Some indirect effects of environment on wood formation. In: The formation of wood in forest trees, pp. 345-365, Zimmermann, M.H., ed. New York: Academic Press 1964 Morey, P.R., Cronshaw, J.: Developmental changes in secondary xylem of Acer rubrum induced by various auxins and 2,3,5triiodobenzoic acid. Protoplasma 65, 287-313 (1968a) Morey, P.R., Cronshaw, J. : Developmental changes in the secondary xylem of Acer rubrum induced by gibberellic acid, various auxins and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid. Protoplasma 65, 31~326 (1968b) Morris, D.A., Briant, R.E., Thompson, P.G. : The transport and metabolism of ~4C-Iabelled indoleacetic acid in intact pea seedlings. Planta (Berl.) 89, 178 197 (1969) Morris, D.A., Kadir, G.O.: Pathways of auxin transport in the intact pea seedling (Pisum sativum L.). Planta (Berl.) 107, 171-182 (1972) Morris, D.A., Kadir, G.O., Barry, A.J. : Auxin transport in intact pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.): The inhibition of transport by 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid. Planta (Berl.) 110, 173-182 (1973) Morris, D.A., Thomas, A.G.: The specificity of auxin transport in intact pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.). Planta (Berl.) 118, 225-234 (1974) Morris, D.A., Winfield, P.J.: Kinetin transport to axillary buds of dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L.). J. exp. Bot. 23, 346-355 (1972) Panigrahi, B.M., Audus, L.J.: Apical dominance in Vicia faba. Ann. Bot. 30, 457473 (1966) Phillips, I.D.J. : Apical dominance. In : Physiology of plant growth and development, pp. 165-202, Wilkins, M.B., ed. London: McGraw-Hill 1969 Sachs, T. : Senescence of inhibited shoots of peas and apical dominance. Ann. Bot. 30, 44%456 (1966) Sachs, T., Thimann, K.V.: Release of lateral buds from apical dominance. Nature (Lond.) 201,939-940 (1964) Sachs, T., Thimann, K.V.: The role of auxins and cytokinins in the release of buds from apical dominance. Amer. J. Bot. 54, 136-144 (1967) Scott, T.K., Briggs, W.R.: Auxin relationships in the Alaska pea (Pisurn sativum). Amer. J. Bot. 47, 492 499 (1960) Snow, R. : Experiments on growth and inhibition. II. New phenomena of inhibition. Proc. Roy. Soc. B 108, 209-223 (1931) Snow, R.: On the nature of correlative inhibition. New Phytol. 36, 283 300 (1937) Thimann, K.V., Skoog, F. : On the inhibition of bud development and other functions of growth substances in Vicia faba. Proc. Roy. Soc. B 114, 317-339 (1934) Wareing, P.F. : Interaction between indoleacefic acid and gibberellic acid in cambiai activity. Nature (Lond.) 181, 1744-1745 (1958) Wareing, P.F., Hanney, C.E.A., Digby, J. : The role of endogenous hormones in cambial activity and xylem differentiation. In: The formation of wood in forest trees, pp. 323-344, Zimmermann, M.H., ed. New York: Academic Press 1964 Woolley, D.J:, Wareing, P.F.: The interaction between growth promoters in apical dominance. I. Hormonal interaction, movement and metabolism of a cytokinin in rootless cuttings. New Phytol. 71,781-793 (1972a) Woolley, D.J., Wareing, P.F.: The role of roots, cytokinins and apical dominance in the control of lateral shoot form in Solanum andigena. Planta (Berl.) 105, 33 42 (1972b)

Received 15 April; accepted 27 April 1977

Transport of exogenous auxin in two-branched dwarf pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) : Some implications for polarity and apical dominance.

Dwarf pea plants bearing two cotyledonary shoots were obtained by removing the epicotyl shortly after germination, and the patterns of distribution of...
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