Vol. 42 (5): 967-972, September - October, 2016

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

doi: 10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2015.0644

Retrospective comparative study of rigid and flexible ureteroscopy for treatment of proximal ureteral stones _______________________________________________ Ehab Mohamad Galal 1, Ahmad Zaki Anwar 1, Tarek Khalaf Fath El-Bab 1, Amr Mohamad Abdelhamid 1 1

Department of Urology, Minia University, Minia, Egypt

ABSTRACT ARTICLE INFO ______________________________________________________________

______________________

Background: We analyzed the outcome and complications of rigid (R-URS) and flexible (F-URS) ureteroscopic lithotripsy for treatment of proximal ureteric stone (PUS). Subjects and methods: Retrospective data of 135 patients (93 males and 42 females) submitted to R-URS and F-URS for treatment of PUS in the period between July 2013 and January 2015 were investigated. (R-URS, group 1) was performed in 72 patients while 63 patients underwent (F-URS, group 2).We compared the 2 groups for success, stone characteristics, operative time, intraoperative and postoperative complications. Results: The overall stone free rate (SFRs) was 49/72 (68%) in group 1 and 57/63 (91%) patients in group 2, (P=0.005). The operative time was shorter in group 1 in comparison to group 2 with statistically significant difference (P=0.005). There was not any statistically significant difference between 2 groups in complication rate (P=0.2). Conclusıon: Both R-URS and F-URS could be a feasible option for treatment of PUS. R-URS is less successful for treatment of PUS and should be used cautiously and with availability of F-URS.

Keywords: Calculi; Ureteroscopy; Ureter; Lithotripsy

INTRODUCTION Based on the findings of European Association of Urology (EAU) Nephrolithiasis Guidelines, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopy (URS; retrograde or antegrade) remain the primary treatment modalities for the management of symptomatic proximal ureteral stone (PUS) with comparable stone-free rates (SFRs) (1, 2). Certainly, SWL does offer potential advantages over ureteroscopy in the treatment of PUS 2mm were extracted using 1.6F zero-tipped nitinol stone basket (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN, USA). At the

end of the procedure, we evaluated carefully the ureteral lumen for any complications and then 4.8F 26cm double j stent (DJS) was inserted based on surgeon’s decision and removed under local anesthesia. When the stone migrated to the kidney, the procedure was completed using F-URS or DJS inserted for SWL according to stone size and exact site inside the collecting system while rigid ureteroscopy was accepted as unsuccessful. These patients were not included in group 2. In case of inability to advance the ureteroscope even after trial of ureteral dilation, a DJS was inserted into the ureter and second look was done at least after 2 weeks, and the procedure was also accepted as unsuccessful. F-URS was done using 7.5F flexible ureterorenoscope (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). After passing a 0.038 inch floppy-tipped guidewire through the cystoscope under fluoroscopy, a Flexi-Tip Dual Lumen Ureteral Access Catheter (Cook Medical, Bloomington, IN, USA) was used for insertion of a second 0.038 inch guidewire. A ureteral access sheath (9/11F or 12/14F) was introduced over the guidewire. We inserted F-URS into the ureter and disintegration was done using 200-micron holmium laser fiber at an energy level of 0.6–0.8J and at a rate of 10–25Hz. Residual fragments >2mm were extracted using 1.6F zero-tipped nitinol stone basket and a 4.8F 26cm DJS was left in place after careful evaluation of the ureteral lumen for any complications. Unsuccessful procedure was considered when we could not pass the access sheath even with trial of ureteral dilation. Statistical analysis Results are presented as mean±standard deviation (SD). Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Student’s t-test and chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. A value of P

Retrospective comparative study of rigid and flexible ureteroscopy for treatment of proximal ureteral stones.

We analyzed the outcome and complications of rigid (R-URS) and flexible (F-URS) ureteroscopic lithotripsy for treatment of proximal ureteric stone (PU...
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