Leveraging User Query Sessions to Improve Searching of Medical Literature Shiwen Cheng1, Vagelis Hristidis, PhD1, Michael Weiner, MD, MPH2,3,4 1

Computer Science and Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA; 2Center of Excellence on Implementing Evidence-Based Practice, Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Health Services Research and Development Service HFP 04-148, 3Indiana University Center for Health Services and Outcomes Research, 4 Regenstrief Institute, Inc., Indianapolis, IN Abstract Published reports about searching medical literature do not refer to leveraging the query context, as expressed by previous queries in a session. We aimed to assess novel strategies for context-aware searching, hypothesizing that this would be better than baseline. Building upon methods using term frequency-inverse document frequency, we added extensions such as a function incorporating search results and terms of previous queries, with higher weights for more recent queries. Among 60 medical students generating queries against the TREC 9 benchmark dataset, we assessed recall and mean average precision. For difficult queries, we achieved improvement (27%) in average precision over baseline. Improvements in recall were also seen. Our methods outperformed baseline by 4% to 14% on average. Furthermore, the effectiveness of context-aware search was greater for longer query sessions, which are typically more challenging. In conclusion, leveraging the previous queries in a session improved overall search quality with this biomedical database.

Introduction Millions of queries are issued each day on the PubMed system1. Due to the importance of searching PubMed, a large number of Web-based applications have been deployed for this2. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) has included tracks for this domain of data, e.g., the TREC Genomics Tracks in 2006 and 20073,4. An ideal query session would contain only a single query, which would always generate the most relevant results. Much work has proposed methods to improve searching of PubMed5,6,7: term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) ranking, which reflects differences in the frequency of search terms among documents in a corpus of documents, has been shown to outperform binary search, which simply returns all documents that match all search terms5. Further, citation data have been used to increase the score of highly-cited publications, similarly to Google’s PageRank algorithm6, which has been successful in Web Search, for searching PubMed7. More recently, a semantic network was constructed using domain concepts in a document to improve the PubMed data searching8. Despite enhancements from these methods, many users must generate more than one query to yield desired results. Improving the methods for searching medical databases may increase the chance that relevant documents will be seen, and may decrease the time required to conduct a search. We propose a new approach to improve searching of biomedical literature, by identifying the context of a query, which is orthogonal to these previous solutions, and hence could complement them. With a search topic in mind, users start a query session by submitting a query to the search engine (e.g., PubMed) to find relevant documents. While trying to satisfy their information need on the search topic, at each step they either browse more of the returned results (e.g., viewing the next page of results), or they choose to modify (reformulate) their query to convey their search topic more effectively, given the results they have seen so far. To the best of our knowledge, there has not been any study on how to leverage the query session to improve the ranking of results in biomedical literature. That is, the state-of-the-art biomedical search engines handle each query in a query session independently, i.e., a query does not affect the results of any subsequent query. We believe this is an important direction, as research on other domains in Information Retrieval (IR), like general Web searches by consumers, has shown that the past queries in a query session can help understand the user’s search topic9; hence, a search engine can compute the ranking not only based on the current query, but also considering the past queries in the same query session. This idea is the basis of the session track, created by TREC in 201010, which attracted many competitors to study various methods to improve query effectiveness with query session data on Web

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search. The session track taught us that using previous queries and results in the same session can improve the ranking quality11. For instance, 13 groups in session track 2011 submitted their results on an approximately 25TB web page dataset. It is shown in these submissions that by utilizing query session data they can achieve over 10% improvement on the ranking quality of top-10 results even for the strongest baseline11. However, to the best of our knowledge, sessions have not been used in the ranking of biomedical data searches. We propose novel methods to perform context-aware search in biomedical data. We postulate that PubMed is an ideal setting for this research, since PubMed users reformulate their queries 4.44 times, on average, in a query session1. Objective: In this paper, we study the context-aware searching of PubMed data. Our hypothesis is that a user’s query session can be used to define the query context for the current query, and this context can be used to improve the ranking of the returned results in PubMed data.

Methods For the purpose of this work, we assume that the user progressively submits related queries, based on the top results of the previous queries. The context-aware ranking principle indicates that for two associated (in the same query session) consecutive queries Qk-1 and Qk, the user is likely to prefer the search results related to both queries, and thus such results should be promoted for Qk9. That is, if two results of Qk have about the same score with respect to Qk, the user likely prefers the result that is also relevant to Qk-1, since Qk-1 is also related to the user’s search topic. We incorporate this principle in our model. We propose context-aware search strategies that build upon the two most popular ranking techniques in IR: TF-IDFbased BM25 and Language Models, which are described below. Note that our methods assume that we know when a query session starts and ends, that is, when the user switches to an entirely different search (i.e., different topic). Detecting the start and end of a query session is outside the scope of this paper. To handle this, we can use existing query-session detection techniques12,13. Incorporate context-aware search in TF-IDF ranking We built our ranking strategy on top of the Lucene14 system, which is a popular, open-source, high-performance text-based search engine. The ranking function of Lucene is based on the well-accepted Okapi BM25 ranking formula15, which is a state-of-the-art TF-IDF retrieval function and is widely used in both academia and industry. Lucene supports weighted queries, i.e. each query term can be assigned a different importance weight. BaselineBM25: The baseline TF-IDF search method applies the Lucene ranking function and treats each user query independently of the previous queries in the query session. We denote this ranking as BaselineBM25. M1: We used previous research in IR to represent the query context based on the past queries16,17. We adopted the following ranking function, which incorporates the terms of all past queries in the query session. In particular, the probability of query term w appearing in the current query, given query sequence Q1, Q2, …,Qn (Qn is the current query) is: ( |

,

, …

)=

( , |

|

)

(1 − )

(1)

where, ( , ) is the number of occurrences of term w in query Qi, and |Qi| is the number of terms in Qi. In this work we do not consider phrases as terms, but only single words, excluding stopwords. is the decay factor to reflect that older queries in the query session are less important; we set =0.6 in our experiments (we found no considerable difference in the results for values of around 0.5). We build a context-aware query ′ that includes all terms in the query session Q1, Q2, …,Qn. Each term is assigned an importance weight equal to its probability as computed in Equation 1. We refer to this context-aware ranking method as M1. We submit ′ to Lucene, which supports term weighing as mentioned above. Incorporate context aware-search in Language Model ranking A popular alternative to TF-IDF ranking is Language Model (LM)-based ranking18, where the score of a document is the probability that the document will generate the query. In particular, a document R is viewed as a bag of words, and the probability of each word is its frequency in the document over the total number of words in the document. Then, the score Score(R, Q) of a result R for query Q is the probability Prob(Q | R) that a generative model, which at

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each step picks a term from R according to its frequency-based probability, will generate Q. More details are available in the paper of Song and Croft18. BaselineLM: The baseline is to consider each query separately and use the LM ranking formula18. Let L1, L2, …, Ln be the ranked results lists for Q1, Q2, …, Qn (Qn is the current query) respectively. According to the context-aware ranking principle mentioned above, if two ranked lists Li and Lj from the same query session are similar to each other, the results that appear in both Li and Lj have a higher chance of being relevant to the user’s search topic. Based on the key principle of LM-based ranking18, for each result R we compute a context-aware score according to the likelihood of generating the query session Q1, Q2, …, Qn given R. Making the assumption that queries are independent of each other, which is common in IR, the context-aware score of R can be computed using Equation 2, which expresses a standard method to combine independent pieces of evidence using a weighted average combination19. (

,

, …

| ) =

(

| ) +

(

| ) + … . +

(

| )

(2)

where αi is the weight (importance) of Qi. We can compute each of the P(Qi | Rn,j) terms using the well-studied LM ranking formula18. Thus, the key challenge is how to estimate weights αi, 1 ≤ i ≤ n, based on the context-aware ranking principle. We propose to calculate αi as follows: )



=

!



'*+,',

# $%& , &' (

(3)

Where Sim(Li, Lj) measures the similarity between two ranked results lists Li and Lj. The first factor in Equation 3 assigns higher weight to more recent queries. Several standard measurements can compute the similarity of ranked results lists20. We consider three strategies to compute Sim(Li, Lj), which correspond to three proposed context-aware ranking strategies: • •



|& ∩ &' |

M2: Sim(Li, Lj) is the Jaccard similarity21, that is, -./(0 , 01 ) = . |& ∪ &'| M3: Sim(Li, Lj) is one minus the normalized Spearman’s Footrule22 between the ranked results lists. Spearman’s Footrule measures the ranking disarray. Two identical lists have Spearman’s Footrule equal to 0, and two lists ranked inversely from each other have Spearman’s Footrule 1. To compute the Spearman Footrule on two partial lists, where not all elements from the one list appear in the other, we used the formula by Fagin et al.20 In this variant, two lists have Spearman’s Footrule 1 if they have no common items. M4: We measured the difference between the term distributions of the concatenation of title, abstract, and MeSH terms of the top results of the two lists. For that, we use the Kullback-Leibler distance23, which is a standard measure for this purpose. Kullback-Leibler distance is non-negative and unbounded. To normalize it, we used 45 �� 60 = 7 89 where kl is the original Kullback-Leibler distance, such that 45:/60is bounded to (0, 1]. When two term distributions are identical, kl is 0, thus 45:/60 is set to 1. If the kl is large, then 45:/60 is close to 0.

In all methods, we use the top-K results from each list in our experiments to measure the lists’ similarity, with K=100. Evaluation Measures: We measured the search quality of these strategies using Precision, Recall, Average Precision, and Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain (NDCG)24. Average Precision and NDCG take into consideration the ranking positions of the returned relevant results. The Average Precision for the top-K results is calculated as follows: ; 3.

In Figure 3 and 4, we observe that the improvement over the baseline is increasing for longer query sessions, as more context information can be leveraged. Next, we study how the effectiveness of context-aware ranking varies with the difficulty of the search topic. We split the 22 search topics into three categories: “easy”, “medium” and “difficult”. We use [email protected]

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([email protected]) of baseline as the splitting criterion: the 7 topics with highest [email protected] ([email protected]) are defined as “easy” topics, the 7 topics with lowest [email protected] ([email protected]) are defined as “difficult” topics, and the remaining 8 topics are “medium”. Figures 5 and 6 show the improvement of the context-aware methods for the three search topic categories, for top-30 (top-50) results respectively. Average improvement

2

3

30% 20% 10% 0% [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

(a) M1 vs. BaselineBM25 on top-30 results

Average improvement

2

3

10% 5% 0% [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

(b) M2 vs. BaselineLM on top-30 results

Average improvement

Figure 4. Search quality improvement on top-30 results over baseline for (a) M1 and (b) M2 with respect to the number of query modifications for a search task. For each search task, the improvement over the corresponding baseline method on each measurement is calculated, and the improvement is then averaged over all search tasks with same query session length. The improvements of M1 over BaselineBM25 are all with p-value < 0.01. easy

medium

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30% 20% 10% 0% [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Average improvement

(a) M1 vs. BaselineBM25 on top-50 results 20%

easy

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10% 0% [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

(b) M2 vs. BaselineLM on top-50 results Figure 5. Search quality improvement on top-50 results over baseline for (a) M1 and (b) M2 on the three categories of search topics. For each search task, the improvement of M1 (M2) over BaselineBM25 (BaselineLM) is calculated, and the improvement is then averaged across each category. The improvements of M2 over BaselineLM on “medium” and “difficult” queries are with p-value < 0.01 and M1 over BaselineBM25 are all with p-value < 0.01. In Figures 5 and 6, we observe that the improvement of context-aware search (M1 & M2) over baselines is generally larger for more difficult search topics. Thus, context-aware search is more useful for more difficult search topics. An exception is M2 for top-30 results (Figure 6(b)), where we see a larger improvement for “medium” search topics and

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Average improvement

even a decrease in performance for some “easy” search topics. This shows that the BaselineLM ranking is more effective when we examine only the top- 30 results as opposed to examining the top-50 results (Figure 5(b)). easy

30% 20% 10% 0%

[email protected]

medium

difficult

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Average improvement

(a) M1 over BaselineBM25 on top-30 results easy

20%

medium

difficult

10% 0% [email protected]

-10%

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

(b) M2 over BaselineLM on top-30 results

[email protected]

Figure 6. Search quality improvement on top-30 results over baseline for (a) M1 and (b) M2 on the three categories of search topics. For each search task, improvement of M1 (M2) over BaselineBM25 (BaselineLM) on each measurement is calculated, and the improvement is then averaged across each category. The improvements of M1 over BaselineBM25 are all with p-value < 0.01 and M2 over BaselineLM are all with p-value < 0.01. BaselineBM25

0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 1

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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Search Topic ID

Figure 7. [email protected] for all 22 search topics. Recall of each search topic is averaged over all search tasks for that topic.

[email protected]

BaselineBM25

M1

BaselineLM

M2

0.2 0.1 0 1

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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Search Topic ID

Figure 8. [email protected] for all 22 search topics. Average Precision of each search topic is averaged over all search tasks for that topic. Figure 7 presents the [email protected] and Figure 8 depicts the [email protected] for the 22 search topics from BaselineBM25, M1, BaselineLM and M2. The results averaged on the 22 search topics are shown in Table 1. In Figure 7, we observe that for 21 out of the 22 topics M1 performs better than BaselineBM25 and for 18 M2 performs better than BaselineLM. In Figure 8, we observe that for 21 out of the 22 topics, M1 outperforms BaselineBM25, and for 17, M2 outperforms BaselineLM.

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Discussion Motivated by recent research in the IR community, in this paper we propose and evaluate the first context-aware ranking strategies in biomedical literature, by leveraging the user query session. Our methods leverage both the search results of the queries in a query session and the terms in the queries, as evidence of a user’s search context. We tested multiple strategies to incorporate the context information into state-of-the-art ranking algorithms. The experimental results confirm our hypothesis. We observe that the context-aware ranking strategies improve the quality of PubMed data search by 4% to 14% over the BM25 baseline. Our context-aware search strategies for LMbased search also outperform the baseline. A key finding is that the improvement over the baseline methods is much higher for more difficult queries, a finding that increases the impact of our results. In particular, for more difficult queries, we achieve 27% improvement in Average Precision over the BM25 ranking baseline. Our context-aware search methods have a smaller improvement for LM-based ranking, where we observe 8% to 19% improvement for difficult queries for top-50 results. A possible explanation is that for easier topics the users often generate accurate queries to convey the search topic from the beginning, thus the evidence inferred from past queries will not help as much as with difficult topics to remove the disambiguation of the current query. We also found that the effectiveness of context-aware search is greater for longer query sessions, which are typically more challenging, since users modify their query when they do not like the returned results. A limitation of our experimental method is that we do not ask users to generate separate query sessions for each of the six evaluated ranking methods, but use the same query sessions to evaluate all methods. The reason is that otherwise this would require a six-fold increase in the number of subjects, which are difficult and expensive to recruit. In particular, to record the query sessions we use a TF-IDF ranking for half and an LM ranking for the other half search topics. Another limitation is that the used benchmark TREC 9 filtering dataset is relatively old, but there is no newer dataset that has the user relevance judgments needed in this project. Further, we did not study whether and how the quality (e.g., accuracy) of user queries changes during a session; later queries would be expected to have higher quality. We would expect this trend among all of the ranking algorithms studied, since they share the same query sessions. We did not statistically account for the relationship between users and query results; that is, we did not treat users differently according to their success with the queries. Our methods can be readily incorporated into existing search systems. To apply our methods, such a system would need to cache a short history of user queries. To define the query session, a simple but possibly cumbersome (for the user) solution is to let the user define or mark explicitly when a new query session begins. Alternatively, the system could automatically detect the start of a query session12,13. In summary, based on our results, leveraging the previous queries in a query session comes closer to the ideal of one query per session, thereby improving the search quality in a biomedical search engine.

Acknowledgements Authors Cheng and Hristidis were partially supported by National Science Foundation grants IIS-1216032 and IIS1216007. This project was also supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Health Services Research and Development Service HFP 04-148. Dr. Weiner is Chief of Health Services Research and Development at the Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the National Science Foundation or the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Leveraging user query sessions to improve searching of medical literature.

Published reports about searching medical literature do not refer to leveraging the query context, as expressed by previous queries in a session. We a...
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