Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

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Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics Osamu Matsuda a,⇑, Maria Cristina Larciprete b, Roberto Li Voti b, Oliver B. Wright a a b

Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628, Japan Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l’Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Roma, Italy

a r t i c l e

i n f o

Article history: Received 16 December 2013 Received in revised form 30 May 2014 Accepted 3 June 2014 Available online xxxx Keywords: Optical pump-probe technique Gigahertz and terahertz acoustic waves Longitudinal and shear acoustic waves Interferometer Green’s function

a b s t r a c t The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to picosecond laser ultrasonics, a means by which gigahertz–terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can be used to characterize materials with nanometer spatial resolution. With reference to key experiments, we first review the theoretical background for normal-incidence optical detection of longitudinal acoustic waves in opaque single-layer isotropic thin films. The theory is extended to handle isotropic multilayer samples, and is again compared to experiment. We then review applications to anisotropic samples, including oblique-incidence optical probing, and treat the generation and detection of shear waves. Solids including metals and semiconductors are mainly discussed, although liquids are briefly mentioned. Ó 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction Picosecond laser ultrasonics, or picosecond ultrasonics, is the study of materials using high frequency acoustic pulses generated and detected by ultrashort optical pulses typically 0 (in the absence of thermal diffusion). Also, because of this one-dimensional model, the only non-zero tensor component of the strain is gzz. For an isotropic solid,

rzz ¼ ð2l þ kÞgzz  3BaDTðzÞ:

ð3Þ

Also, rxx = ryy = kgzz  3BaDT(z). The components rxx and ryy are present to prevent lateral contraction (i.e., to make gxx = gyy = 0). Eq. (3) can be rewritten as

rzz ¼ 3

1m Bg  3BaDTðzÞ ¼ q0 v 2l gzz  3BaDTðzÞ; 1 þ m zz

ð4Þ

where vl is the longitudinal sound velocity and q0 is the density. The elastic wave equation for zero body forces, expressed in terms of the z-directed displacement uz, where gzz = @uz/@z, is given by

@ rzz @ 2 uz ¼ q0 2 ; @z @t Z z uz ðz; tÞ ¼ gzz ðz0 ; tÞdz0 :

ð5Þ ð6Þ

þ1

To solve the elastic wave equation we need to know the form of DT(z). For ultrashort pulse optical absorption at the surface of a homogeneous isotropic solid,

ð1  RÞQ fz e 0 for t > 0; ACf0

r0ij ¼  2laij þ kakk dij DT:

DTðz; tÞ ¼

DTðz; tÞ ¼ 0 for t < 0;

This can be seen by comparison with Eq. (2). Alternatively, Eq. (2) implies that cijkl = 2ldikdjl + kdijdkl. However, for isotropic solids, aij = adij, where a is the coefficient of linear thermal expansion. So

where R is the optical intensity reflection coefficient, Q is the incident optical pulse energy, A is the area over which the energy Q is distributed (assumed to be a uniform distribution), C is the heat

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capacity per unit volume, and f0 is the optical absorption depth of the pump light. For the boundary condition, there should be no stretching perpendicular to the surface at the surface itself, since there cannot be any restoring force there. Therefore, rzz = 0 at z = 0. From Eq. (4) this means that at any time t > 0, for z = 0 the relation gzz = g0 should hold, where

g0 ¼

3Bað1  RÞQ : ACf0 q0 v 2l

For the initial conditions, gzz = 0, @ gzz/@t = 0, and uz = 0 for all z for t < 0. Using Eqs. (4)–(6), the wave equation for uz can be written as

@ 2 uz @ 2 uz v 2l g0 fz ¼ v 2l þ e 0: 2 @z2 f0 @t

rzz ¼ 

The general solution is given by fz

uz ¼ f ðz  v l tÞ þ gðz þ v l tÞ  f0 g0 e

0

:

In order to find f and g, we extend the functions f and g to apply also to the z < 0 region in such a way as to satisfy the boundary condition. This can be done by assuming that we have an even function for displacement at all times. This is equivalent to converting our problem into a more symmetrical form by the addition of an imaginary identical material in front of the surface. For z > 0, fz

uz ¼ f ðz  v l tÞ þ gðz þ v l tÞ  f0 g0 e

0

;

and, for z < 0 (in front of the material surface), 0

z f0

To be consistent (i.e., to have a single solution for all positive and negative z) the functions representing propagation in the same direction should be chosen to be identical (because the waves travelling in the same direction join up smoothly at z = 0 as there is no longer an interface there in this new problem). So f(z  vlt) = g(z + vlt) and g(z + vlt) = f(z  vlt) for all z and t from the above two equations. Therefore jzj

f

uz ¼ f ðz  v l tÞ þ f ðz  v l tÞ  f0 g0 e

0

ðvalid for z > 0 or z < 0Þ;

and jzj @uz  ¼ f 0 ðz  v l tÞ  f 0 ðz  v l tÞ þ g0 e f0 sgnðzÞ; @z

where sgn (z) = 1 for z > 0, 1 for z < 0, 0 for z = 0. Now we can use the initial condition @uz/@zjt=0 = 0: from the jzj  above equation, f 0 ðzÞ  f 0 ðzÞ ¼ g0 e f0 sgnðzÞ. In general the equation F(z)  F(z) = G(z), where G(z) is an odd function, can be solved uniquely with F(z) = F(z) = G(z)/2:

With

g0 2

jzj

f

e

this

0

sgnðzÞ:

choice

f0 (z)

of

the

boundary

condition,

gzz jz¼0 ¼ @uz [email protected]z¼0 ¼ g0 , is automatically satisfied. (It should be because we chose to extend the problem to both positive and negative values of z in order to satisfy the boundary condition.) Combining equations we obtain, for all z: z

gzz ¼ g0 ef0 sgnðzÞ þ

g0



2



e

jzþv l tj f0



sgnðz  v l tÞ  e

jzv l tj f0

 sgnðz  v l tÞ :

Unlike the displacement uz, this is an odd function of z. We only require the solution for z > 0: [1,8] z

gzz ¼ g0 ef0 

g0 2





e

zþv l t f0



þe

jzv l tj f0

1

1

¼ f ðz  v l tÞ þ gðz þ v l tÞ  f0 g0 e :

 sgnðz  v l tÞ :

ð7Þ

q0 v 2l g0 2

 zþv t  jzv l tj  l  e f0 þ e f0 sgnðz  v l tÞ :

In contrast to the strain, there is no stress left near the surface of the solid after the stress pulse has had time to propagate away from the surface (i.e. a long way compared to f0). Otherwise the form of the stress and strain is identical. Just after the arrival of the optical pulse the longitudinal stress is rzz ðz; 0Þ ¼ q0 v 2l g0 expðz=f0 Þ. If a > 0 and DT > 0 this stress is compressive, and so is the leading edge of the strain pulse. If we take the origin of the spatial coordinates at the centre of the strain pulse when the strain is far from the sample surface, then the temporal Fourier transform of this propagating strain component is given by

Z

jzj

f

uz ¼ f ðjzj  v l tÞ þ gðjzj þ v l tÞ  f0 g0 e

f 0 ðzÞ ¼ 

The strain consists of a constant first term and a propagating second term. The reflection coefficient for the strain at the surface is  1. Because of this, the propagating component is bipolar, as shown in Fig. 2(a). It consists of two decaying exponentials of decay length f0 stitched together with opposite signs. The time it takes for the strain to reach a significant strength is f0/vl, the sound propagation time across f0. After the propagating strain component has left the near-surface region, corresponding to a time J 5f0/vl [see Fig. 2(a)], a constant and spatially exponentially decaying strain is evident near the surface owing to the thermal expansion there. The wavelength of this strain pulse is of the order of 2pf0. (The frequency of the maximum strain amplitude is f = vl/(2pf0), as explained below.) To find the stress rzz we substitute for gzz in Eq. (4). For z > 0,

gzz ðz; tÞeixt dt ¼ g0

ix ; x2 þ 1=s2

where x is the acoustic angular frequency and s = f0/vl is the sound propagation time across the optical absorption depth f0. For f0 = 10 nm and vl = 5 km s1, as is typical for metals, the modulus of the frequency spectrum has a peak at f = vl/(2pf0)  80 GHz, corresponding to an acoustic wavelength of about 60 nm. Figure 2(b) shows the calculated modulus of the ultrasonic frequency spectrum for chromium using blue light, in which case vl = 6.65 km s1, f0 = 13.5 nm and f = vl/(2pf0)  80 GHz [9]. The more general problem of thermoelastic strain generation at the surface of opaque anisotropic medium has been discussed in terms of temporal Fourier transforms and spatial Laplace transforms including the residue theorem [10]. 2.1.3. Diffusion processes and other strain generation mechanisms If diffusion processes are taken into account, the generated strain pulse is broadened for two reasons: (i) the generation process is spread out over time; (ii) the generation process is spread out over space. In metals one needs to take into account the effects of both thermal and electron diffusion [1,2,5,9–13]. Figure 3 shows the effect of including diffusion processes in the calculation of the strain pulse shape for chromium when pumped with ultrashort light pulses at a central wavelength of 415 nm [9]. The result of including both diffusion processes is a broadened strain pulse with a peak in the frequency spectrum reduced to 50 GHz. In semiconductors one needs to take into account both thermal and carrier diffusion [1,14–16]. Moreover, the strain produced in semiconductors by excitation with an ultrashort light pulse depends strongly on the carrier density as well as on the temperature change. In this case, Eq. (4) must be modified to include the electronic stress contribution arising from the excited carriers, because, in general, the carrier lifetime will not be negligible compared to the acoustic pulse durations involved: [1]

rzz ¼ q0 v 2l gzz  3BaDTðzÞ þ

X @Ek k

@ gzz

Nk

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Fig. 2. (a) Plot of the longitudinal strain gzz(z) in an isotropic solid of optical absorption length f0 and longitudinal sound velocity vl at different times after the arrival at t = 0 of an ultrashort optical pulse at the surface (for g0 > 0). (b) Plot of the calculated normalized modulus of the frequency spectrum of an acoustic pulse excited in chromium by an ultrashort blue light pulse of wavelength 415 nm with f0 = 13.5 nm. The effects of diffusion are ignored in the calculation.

where @Ek/@ gzz is the deformation potential and Nk is the carrier density for a carrier of energy Ek and wave vector k. This extra term can be understood through arguments based on statistical mechanics, and it is often a good approximation to replace it by [email protected]/@p, where Eg is the band gap and N is the total excited carrier density. (This is analogous to the formula for the pressure P p ¼ i pi ðdEi =dVÞ according to the canonical distribution for a series of energy levels Ei with occupation probability pi for a system of volume V.) In the case of GaAs (1 0 0) excited at a wavelength of 375 nm, for example, the strain generated by the electronic stress is 6 times larger than the strain generated by the thermoelastic stress, but of the same sign [11]. In experiments on Si (1 0 0) a dominant strain was generated by the electronic stress and was observed to have the opposite sign to the thermal expansion, as evidenced by a hollow appearing in the surface on irradiation with ultrashort light pulses of wavelength 630 nm [17]. In piezoelectric materials there is a strong contribution from the generation of time-dependent electric fields. This contribution may completely dominate the generated strain and observed optical reflectance changes [18–23]. 2.1.4. Acoustic generation in more complicated sample structures In multilayer or more complicated sample geometries, the optical absorption characteristics of the sample need to be worked out to calculate the generated strain [8,24]. As with single-layer samples this will in general depend on the wavelength, angle of incidence, state of polarization and pulse duration of the optical beam. In addition, any diffusion effects need to be taken into account to determine the time dependent strain distribution. If

the symmetry of the strain generation is broken by crystal anisotropy or by complicated three-dimensional sample geometries, it may be necessary to solve the relevant equations by numerical methods and to consider the excitation of both longitudinal and shear acoustic waves [21,25]. The sample may also contain elements that are transparent. One particular example is a sample consisting of a thin transparent film on an opaque substrate. Another very similar example is a thick opaque metal film on a transparent substrate with the optical illumination from the transparent substrate side. Instead of the bipolar strain pulse shape one obtains a unipolar pulse shape in the transparent material. The strain pulse shape in the opaque material can be either unipolar or bipolar, depending on acoustic impedances (q0vl) of the materials used [26,27]. The growth of transparent thin films can be monitored by picosecond laser ultrasonics, as was shown for the case of ice films [28]. In semiconductor superlattices or heterostructures, or other partially transparent multilayers, optical transfer matrix methods can be used to determine the generated strain distribution, although this may rely on the assumption of effective optical constants in very thin layers and can also depend on the shape of the carrier wave functions [16,18–20,22,29–37]. 2.2. Basic theory of optical detection of picosecond strain pulses 2.2.1. Absorption in isotropic solids Consider the case of optical incidence on a sample with an optical probe pulse. First consider a linear, homogeneous, isotropic and lossless medium, for which D = ee0E, B = l0H and P = e0vE = e0(e  1)E, where P, E and D are the polarization, electric field and electric displacement vectors, B and H are the magnetic flux density and the magnetic field strength vectors, and e = 1 + v is the relative permittivity, e0 is the permittivity of free space, v is the electric susceptibility, and l0 is the permeability of free space. The Maxwell0 s equations are

r  E ¼ 0; r  H ¼ 0; r  E ¼ l0 @[email protected]; r  H ¼ ee0 @[email protected]:

Fig. 3. Plot of the calculated strain as a function of time for chromium when excited with ultrashort light pulses at 415 nm wavelength, showing the effect of diffusion processes. Green: no diffusion, blue: with thermal diffusion only, red: including both thermal and electron diffusion. (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

We find r2E = (1/v2)@ 2E/@t2, and similarly for H. All components of E and H obey the same wave equation. Here the optical propagation velocity is v = 1/(ee0l0)1/2 = c/n, where n = e1/2 is the refractive index of the medium, and c is the speed of light in vacuum. For sinusoidally varying fields that are monochromatic, E, H / eixt, where x is the optical angular frequency. So, from the wave equation above,

r2 U þ k21 U ¼ 0;

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

where U is any component of E or H and k1 = x/v = xn/c = kn, k being the free-space wave number. The refractive index n is in general a frequency dependent quantity. We can include the absorption of electromagnetic waves if v = v0 + iv00 : 1=2

k1 ¼ xðee0 l0 Þ1=2 ¼ kð1 þ vÞ1=2 ¼ kð1 þ v0 þ iv00 Þ

~; ¼ kn

pffiffiffi ~¼ e¼n ~ ðxÞ ¼ n þ ij is the complex refractive index. For a where n plane wave, U / eiðk1 zxtÞ ¼ ei½kðnþijÞzxt ¼ eiðknzxtÞ ekjz . Energy absorption depends on U2 / e2kjz = ez/f. So f = 1/(2kj) = k/(4pj), where f is here the optical absorption depth for the probe light. 2.2.2. Reflectance change for a wave reflected from a medium with a perturbed refractive index profile This section follows and extends the method described by Thomsen et al. [1]. First consider the case of normal incidence of a plane-polarized, monochromatic electromagnetic wave on a plane surface of a lossy medium, as summarized in Fig. 4. The stipulation of a monochromatic beam is at odds with the use of an ultrashort light pulse, but it is generally a good assumption for the >100 fs optical pulse durations typically used to ignore the slight spread ( 0. Because the strain pulse is moving, the interference between the light reflected from the surface and the light reflected from the strain pulse varies with time, leading to beats. The phase difference between the probe light reflected from the surface and from the strain pulse is Dw = 2knz + h where h is a constant phase that depends on the amplitude reflection coefficients of the probe light from the surface and from the strain pulse. The inset shows a schematic diagram of the photon and phonon dispersion relations with the transitions marked (that conserve energy E and wavenumber k) for the case of a retreating strain pulse.

the case of a strain pulse moving towards the incident light beam, similar equations to the above apply except that a phonon propagating towards the surface is annihilated and the optical frequency is upshifted. This corresponds to anti-Stokes Brillouin scattering. The condition of Eq. (15) can also be expressed as k/n ffi 2K, where K is the acoustic wavelength and k/n is the optical wavelength in the solid. This condition corresponds to that for Bragg scattering (from an acoustic grating of period K). 0 0 0 0 The term e2ik1 z ¼ e2ikn~z ¼ e2iknz ez =f in Eq. (9) also makes it clear 0 that the extra damping ez =f ¼ ev l t=f of the optical beam while inside the solid is responsible for the finite duration sn = f/vl of the oscillating component of the echo dR(t). (In scattering theory language this damping broadens the photon wave vector distribution of the incident light, allowing the above conservation relation Dk = K to be satisfied for phonon frequencies other than 2nk.) This serves to broaden the frequency spectrum of this oscillating component of dR(t). For large f, that is, for a transparent material, the frequency spectrum of this component becomes very narrow, and many oscillations are seen [26,41]. This will be discussed in more detail below. An important parameter that determines the echo shape is the phase of the oscillating component of dR(t) at t = 0. This is determined by the form of the strain pulse and by the optical constants of the material. In the present case there is a discontinuity in the gradient of dR(t) at t = 0 owing to the discontinuity in the strain pulse in the form of Eq. (12). Before continuing it is useful to quickly review the assumptions used in the theory of optical detection so far: 1. The solid is optically and acoustically isotropic. 2. The optical and acoustic beams are considered as infinitely wide plane waves travelling in the z direction. 3. The perturbation of the refractive index is very small. 4. Acoustic and optical dispersion and acoustic losses are neglected. 5. The acoustic frequency is much smaller than the optical frequency (a result of vl  c). 6. The optical and acoustic propagation are governed by linear equations. 7. The optical probe light does not significantly perturb the strain pulse (e.g. by significantly changing its frequency spectrum through the scattering process). 8. The finite optical bandwidth of the probe light pulse is small enough so that the optical constants in Eq. (9) can be assumed to take on unique values.

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

9. The optical pulse duration is long enough for the different components of the reflected light to interfere coherently. The relaxation of any of these assumptions leads, of course, to more interesting physics. 2.2.4. Frequency spectrum of the echoes By taking the temporal Fourier transform (FT) of dR(t) for an echo we may determine its frequency spectrum. Quickly stated, the FT of the transient component of the echo is a measure of the frequency spectrum in the strain pulse (or, more precisely, its integral), whereas the FT of the oscillating component is heavily influenced by the dominant frequency fn = 2nvl/k and the decay time sn = f/vl (that determines the spectrum width). Figure 9(a) shows an example of the modulus of the frequency spectra of the calculated total echo [/dR(t)] in Fig. 7. Compared to an equivalent spectrum of the strain shown in Fig. 9(c), the echo spectrum is much narrower. This narrowing in fact increases as the probe beam optical absorption depth f increases. The exact form of the spectrum is very sensitive to the values of the optical constants chosen. In Fig. 9(b) the spectrum is shown when the photoelastic constants are chosen as dn/ dg + idj/dg = 1  i instead of 1 + i. This has the effect of producing a dip in the spectrum as well as extending the spectrum to lower frequencies. When making measurements with different solids one should therefore take care to check what effect the optical detection process has on the observed spectrum of dR(t). 2.2.5. Optical phase changes Detection in picosecond laser ultrasonics is not limited to reflectivity changes. Equation (9) has both real and imaginary parts. Let us consider the physical significance of the imaginary part. To do this we write r0 = r1 exp (i/1), where r0 is the probe amplitude reflectance in the absence of the pump pulses, r1 = jr0j, and /1 = arg (r0). It is convenient to define r = r1 (1 + q) exp[i(/1 + d/ )], where q(1) is the relative change in the real part of the reflectance and d/(1) is the change in optical phase. A Taylor expansion gives

Fig. 9. (a) Plot of the calculated normalized modulus of the frequency spectrum for the reflectivity change dR(t) for the parameters stated in the caption of Fig. 7. (b) The same but with dn/dg + idj/dg = 1  i instead of 1 + i. The scales in (b) and (a) are the same. (c) The normalized modulus of the frequency spectrum for the strain.

where we have defined u(0, t) = u(t) for brevity. The extra term 2iku(t) in Eq. (16) is purely imaginary, and so does not affect Eq. (11) for dR(t). To understand the time dependence of u(t), consider again a general strain pulse in the form



gðz; tÞ ¼ g0 t þ

z

vl



 z  g0 t  :

ð17Þ

vl

From the definition of the surface displacement u as

uðtÞ ¼ 

Z

1

gðz0 ; tÞdz0 ;

ð18Þ

0

r ¼ r1 ei/1 ð1 þ q þ id/ þ   Þ ffi r 0 þ r 0 ðq þ id/Þ:

one may substitute Eq. (17) into Eq. (18):

Therefore

uðtÞ ¼ v l

In fact both quantities q(t) and d/(t) are of physical interest and can be measured. A good way to measure them in picosecond laser ultrasonics is to use optical interferometry [42–44], although the first measurements that were sensitive to d/ were done using probe beam deflection [2]. These measurements showed that a second detection mechanism, independent of the photoelastic effect, was at work: when the strain pulse is reflected from a free surface, the surface moves, producing a change in the phase of the optical probe beam. This motion of the surface results in a bump in the surface, as illustrated in stage 4 of Fig. 1. The induced optical phase change d/1 associated with this surface motion is given, for the case of normal optical incidence from a vacuum, by

4puð0; tÞ ¼ 2kuð0; tÞ; k

where u(0, t) = uz(0, t) is the surface displacement (at z = 0) in the +z direction (i.e. into the solid). We must therefore revise Eq. (9) and write

~ dn ~ drðtÞ 4ikn ¼ ~ 2 dg 1n r0

t

g0 ðt0 Þdt0  v l

Z

1

dr ffi q þ id/: r0

d/1 ¼

Z

Z

1

0

gðz0 ; tÞe2ikn~z dz0 þ 2ikuðtÞ;

ð16Þ

Making use of the identity we obtain

1 t d dt

g0 ðt0 Þdt0 :

R bðtÞ aðtÞ

0

f ðxÞdx ¼ b ðtÞf ðbðtÞÞ  a0 ðtÞf ðaðtÞÞ,

duðtÞ ¼ 2v l g0 ðtÞ: dt

ð19Þ

Equation (19) shows that u(t) is proportional to the temporal integral of the strain pulse shape when far from the surface. Alternatively, d(d/1)/dt is proportional to g0 (t). Consider now the shape of echoes in picosecond laser ultrasonics when both quantities q(t) and d/(t) are measured. This is routinely done in experiments on metals, semiconductors and dielectrics [8,9,15,16]. The quantity q has the same time dependence as dR, as is obvious from its definition that implies q = dR/(2R0). However, the behaviour of d/(t) is different. Let us return to the bipolar strain pulse of Eq. (12). From Eq. (9), the total relative change in amplitude reflectance is given by

~ ~ drðtÞ 8in dn ¼ q þ id/ ¼ 2 0 2 2 ~ ~ r0 ð1  n Þðn þ j Þ dg þ 2ikuðtÞ:



v l jtj

v l jtj

j0 e f0 þ in~e2iknv l jtj e



f

ð20Þ

0

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

Figure 10 shows the corresponding variations q(t) and d/(t) for the same optical constants as used in Fig. 7. The phase change is made up of two contributions: d/1 = 2ku, the surface displacement contribution, and d/2, a photoelastic contribution arising from the imaginary part of the first term in Eq. (16). These two contributions d/1 and d/2, the total phase change d/ = d/1 + d/2, as well as q are shown on the same scale in Fig. 10. The time dependence of q is the same as that of dR/R0 (since they differ only by a factor of 2). The time dependence of the photoelastic contribution d/2 is analogous to that of q, in that it contains an oscillating contribution and a transient contribution. These two contributions are shown in Fig. 11. As for the case of q or dR/R0, the transient contribution shows the same temporal variation as the integral of the strain u(t) (apart from a possible difference in sign). The oscillating component of q is p/2 out of phase with the oscillating component of d/. This is evident from Eq. (20) since these components arise from the real and imaginary parts in this equation. Equations (16) and (19) suggest that it should be possible to experimentally derive the shape of the strain pulse g0(t) from d(d/)/dt provided that the photoelastic contribution to the phase change is very small. This was in fact done using a beam deflection detection method essentially sensitive to the surface displacement variation [2]. A better method for actually separating the photoelastic and surface displacement contributions using oblique probe light incidence was also theoretically and experimentally demonstrated for isotropic solids [45,46]. 2.2.6. Echo for a d-function strain pulse Much can be gleaned about the physics of echoes by returning to the d-function strain pulse that we originally considered in Section 2.2 for the detection process: g(z, t) = d(t + z/vl)  d(t  z/vl). Unipolar strain pulses similar to this do crop up in practice, both in experiments on thin transparent films on opaque substrates and in experiments on semiconductor quantum wells [16,26]. From Eqs. (16) and (17) we obtain

~ dn ~ drðtÞ 4ikv l n ¼ 2 sgnðtÞe2ikn~v l jtj þ 2ikv l sgnðtÞ ¼ DðtÞ; ~  1 dg n r0

ð21Þ

where D(t) is introduced for brevity. The real and imaginary parts of this function D(t), i.e. q and d/, are plotted vs. time in Fig. 12 together with the two contributions to d/ from the surface displacement (d/1) and from the photoelastic effect (d/2). Because the strain pulse is now symmetric in time, the form of q is

Fig. 10. Typical echo shapes for q and d/ plotted as a function of normalized time vlt/f for the bipolar strain pulse of Eq. (12) being reflected from the free surface of an isotropic solid. The separate contributions to d/ are also shown: d/1rom the surface displacement and d/2 from the photoelastic effect. In this simulation n + ij = 1.5 + 0.2i, n0 + ij0 = 2 + i, k = 830 nm, k0 = 415 nm, and dn/dg + idj/ dg = 1 + i. The spatial decay constant f0 of the strain pulse is j0/j = 5 times smaller than the penetration depth f of the probe light.

9

Fig. 11. Echo shape for the photoelastic contribution d/2 to the optical phase change d/ as a function of normalized time vlt/f for the bipolar strain pulse of Eq. (12) being reflected from the free surface of an isotropic solid. The total contribution is separated into an oscillating term and a transient term. In this simulation n + ij = 1.5 + 0.2i, n0 + ij0 = 2 + i, k = 830 nm, k0 = 415 nm, and dn/dg + idj/ dg = 1 + i. The spatial decay constant f0 of the strain pulse is j0/j = 5 times smaller than the penetration depth f of the probe light.

antisymmetric in time, and likewise for d/2. As in the example of a bipolar strain pulse, there are both oscillating and transient terms in q and d/ (although these are not shown separately here). This will be explained in further detail below. As before, the component d/1 mirrors the surface displacement variation u(t). The surface in this case moves inwards as the tensile strain pulse is reflected to a compressive strain pulse, leading to a sudden positive jump in d/1. According to the present theory the surface remains displaced up to t = +1. [In practice the surface will relax on a time scale (D/ vR) depending on the lateral propagation of surface acoustic waves (of velocity vR) across the spot diameter (of dimension D)]. The presence of the transient photoelastic contributions to q and d/ for this case can be better understood by considering the time derivative of Eq. (21):

 2 ~ dn ~ 2ikn~v jtj ~ dn ~ 4ik v 2 n d drðtÞ n l ¼ 2 l e þ 4ikv l dðtÞ þ 2 dðtÞ ¼ D0 ðtÞ: ~  1 dg ~  1 dg dt r0 n n ð22Þ The first term in Eq. (22) is the photoelastic oscillation term. The second term arises from the surface displacement. The third term

Fig. 12. Typical echo shapes for q and d/ plotted as a function of normalized time vlt/f for the d-function strain pulse being reflected from the free surface of an isotropic solid. The separate contributions to d/ are also shown: d/1 from the surface displacement and d/2 from the photoelastic effect. In this simulation n + ij = 1.5 + 0.2i, k = 830 nm, and dn/dg + idj/dg = 1 + i.

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

has the same time dependence as the surface displacement term but is photoelastic in origin. This is the transient term. To understand how this third term is related to the transient contributions to q, d/ or dR (see Figs. 7 and 11), one should bear in mind that the detection mechanism is linear. Therefore, once the functions DðtÞ and D0 (t) are known, the corresponding variations for any shape of strain pulse g0(t) can be determined using a convolution operation:

Z 1 drðtÞ ¼ DðsÞg0 ðt  sÞds; r0 1  Z 1 d drðtÞ ¼ D0 ðsÞg0 ðt  sÞds: dt r0 1

Fig. 13. Echo shapes represented as amplitude-phase plots for a bipolar strain pulse: (a) q vs. the photoelastic contribution d/2 to the optical phase change. (b) q vs. d/. In this simulation n + ij = 1.5 + 0.2i, n0 + ij0 = 2 + i, k = 830 nm, k0 = 415 nm, and dn/dg + idj/dg = 1 + i. The spatial decay constant f0 of the strain pulse is j0/ j = 5 times smaller than the penetration depth f of the probe light.

The convolution of the strain pulse g0(t) with the d-function in the third term in Eq. (22) will produce the same function g0(t) (apart from a multiplicative constant). On integration we will therefore obtain a transient contribution to proportional to the temporal integral of the strain. This analysis can also give us some insight into the physical meaning of the sensitivity function f(z) introduced by Thomsen et al., as defined in Eq. (11). If we introduce our d-function strain pulse g(z, t) = d(t + z/vl)  d(t  z/vl) into this equation, we find

dRðtÞ ¼ v l f ðv l jtjÞsgnðtÞ: This implies that

ReðDðtÞÞ ¼

vl 2R0

f ðv l jtjÞsgnðtÞ:

ð23Þ

Equation (23) tells us that the response Re (D(t) ) to a d-function strain pulse is proportional to two sensitivity functions f(z) placed back to back in an antisymmetric fashion, with z replaced by vljtj. This gives a satisfying physical interpretation of the sensitivity function. 2.2.7. Amplitude-phase plots of echoes Since a full measurement of an echo requires both amplitude and phase measurements, one way of viewing an echo would be to plot the amplitude against the phase. Figure 13(a) shows a plot of q vs. d/2 (i.e. with the surface displacement contribution removed). The centre of the spiral corresponds to the points t = ±1, whereas the free end of the spiral corresponds to the point t = 0. The size of the vertical and horizontal responses are the same, owing to the p/2 phase difference between the oscillating components of q and d/2. (The transient components of q and d/2 are relatively small.) The rainbow colour is added to convey a measure of jtj. Figure 13(b) shows a plot of q vs. d/. The effect of including the displacement term is to displace the end of the spiral. The shape of the curve at large jtj is not altered because the displacement contribution dies out quickly with increasing jtj. Figure 14 shows similar plots for the d-function pulse. The curves are more complicated because the echo shapes are no longer an even function in time and because of the abrupt changes at t = 0. These plots are possibly the best way to appreciate an echo in picosecond laser ultrasonics at a single glance, although if viewed for too long the psychedelic spirals may jar the nerves. 3. Optical detection in perturbed multilayers and photonic crystals

samples in picosecond laser ultrasonics we may need to account for the inhomogeneous modulation of the permittivity over several layers along the stacking direction induced by a propagating strain pulse. Many commercially and physically important samples such as semiconductor heterostructures or multilayer metal stacks are partially transparent at visible or near-visible optical wavelengths when film thicknesses are in the nanometer to micron range. For one- or two-layer structures, simple techniques have been developed to deal with the problem of multiple optical reflections when calculating the modulation in reflectance or transmittance [26,47,48]. For samples with more layers, a general theoretical approach based on Green’s functions has been developed, allowing the calculation of both reflectance and transmittance changes at normal optical incidence [20]. An outline of this approach is given here. Figure 15 shows the sample geometry in the unperturbed state, consisting of N parallel layers on a substrate. The medium in front of the sample is a transparent isotropic material rather than a vacuum. All materials are considered to be optically and acoustically isotropic. We also assume that the total thickness of the sample is much shorter than the spatial length of the incident optical pulse in the z direction (typically 30 lm for a 100 fs optical pulse). This implies that the light always interferes coherently. The problem is to find the change in reflectance or transmittance of this structure when it contains an arbitrary distribution of longitudinal strain in the stacking (z) direction. There may also be strain in the incident medium or in the substrate, but not at z = ±1. With the linear approximation D ¼ e0 ~eðrÞE, we start by invoking the Maxwell0 s equations for E and B in an medium with an inhomogeneous quasistatic variation in the complex permittivity:

e0 r  ð~eðrÞEÞ ¼ 0; r  B ¼ 0; r  E ¼ @[email protected]; r  B ¼ e0 l0 ~eðrÞ@[email protected];

(a)

4

(b)

4 2

2 0

0

-2

-2

-4

-4 -4 -2

0

2

4

-4

0

4

3.1. Electromagnetic wave equation The reflection of light from multilayer thin film structures is an important problem for a variety of applications. When using such

Fig. 14. Echo shapes represented as amplitude-phase plots for a d-function strain pulse: (a) q vs. the photoelastic contribution d/2 to the optical phase change. (b) q vs. d/. In this simulation n + ij = 1.5 + 0.2i, k = 830 nm, and dn/dg + idj/dg = 1 + i.

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

where ~eðrÞ is the 3  3 complex relative permittivity tensor which is a function of position r. ~eðrÞ is x dependent in general. Combining these equations leads to

r  ðr  EÞ ¼ rðr  EÞ  r2 E ¼ 

@ @2E ðr  BÞ ¼ e0 l0 ~eðrÞ 2 ; @t @t

or

ðr2  grad divÞEðr; tÞ ¼ l0

@2 Dðr; tÞ: @t2

2 ðr2  grad div þ k ~eðrÞÞEðrÞ ¼ 0;

ð24Þ

pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi

e0 l0 is the vacuum wave number.

The 1D geometry of this multilayer problem allows further simplification. Writing E(r) = E(z) for the case of normal incidence, and remembering that ~e is a 3  3 tensor that depends in this case only on a single spatial coordinate (z),

20 6B [email protected]

@ 2 [email protected]

0

0

@ 2 [email protected]

0

0

0

1

3

C 7 2 0 A þ k ~eðzÞ5EðzÞ ¼ 0:

ð25Þ

0

To go further we must again consider the photoelastic effect.

The relative permittivity tensor component of interest, exx, can be divided into an unperturbed part eh (or homogeneous part) and a perturbed part eih (or inhomogeneous part). The unperturbed part is illustrated in Fig. 16. The perturbed part depends partly on the photoelastic effect. Let us take a look at the general equations describing this effect [38,49]:

Deij ¼ Pijkl gkl ;

ð26Þ

where Pijkl is a photoelastic constant tensor and gkl is the strain tensor. Bear in mind that both refractive index and extinction coefficient can be modified by strain, so Pijkl is a complex quantity. In abbreviated notation (1 = xx, 2 = yy, 3 = zz, 4 = yz = zy, 5 = zx = xz, 6 = xy = yx), DeI = PIJgJ. For an isotropic solid, this equation can be written as [38]

1 0 De1 P11 B De C B P 2 C B 12 B C B B B De3 C B P12 C B B B De C ¼ B 0 B 4C B C B B @ De5 A @ 0

De6

0

P12

P12

0

0

P12 ~epe ¼ gB @ 0

0

10

g1 1

P11 P12

P12 P11

0 0

0 0

0 0

0

0

P44

0

0

0

0

0

P44

0

CB g C CB 2 C CB C CB g3 C CB C; CB g C CB 4 C CB C [email protected] g5 A

0

0

0

0

P 44

g6

0 P12 0

1 0 C 0 A P11

defines the photoelastic perturbation to ~e. The longitudinal strain distribution evidently does not induce off-diagonal components in ~e, so Eq. (25) reduces to two independent and equivalent wave equations for x- and y-polarized light. Without loss of generality we only require a solution for Ex(z), depending on exx only. (This corresponds to the incident light being polarized in the x direction.) We may equivalently express the perturbation in terms of the pffiffiffiffiffiffi ~ ¼ exx : refractive index n

~¼ Dn

 ~ P12 dn dj dn g ¼ þi g ¼ g: ~ dg 2n dg dg

~ =dg in this equation is of course the same as the one The quantity dn that arose in Eqs. (9) and (16). The photoelastic effect occurs in each of the N + 2 regions in the multilayer sample; the contribution to the perturbed part, eih, of the xx component of the permittivity tensor is given by

epe ¼ PðnÞ 12 gðzÞ in the n-th layer:

3.2. Perturbation of the permittivity tensor

0

0

0

Under the assumption of incidence with monochromatic light at frequency x, we can omit the common term eixt and simplify using the equation relating D and E:

where as usual, k ¼ x

where P44 = (P11  P12)/2. In our case of longitudinal strain propagating in the z direction, g3 = gzz is the only non-zero strain component. So for our geometry of normal incidence and x-polarized light, De1 = Dexx = P12g3 = P12gzz = P12g. In fact

In addition, we should also consider the motion of the interfaces due to the strain. At any point in the sample the displacement is

uðzÞ ¼ 

Z

1

gðz0 Þdz0 :

z

We can represent the interface motions (at z = zn) by effective changes in the permittivity in the region of the interfaces. The changes themselves are large, but their regions of application are restricted to tiny slices close to the interfaces, because the interface displacements are in general very small (e.g., 1 pm) compared to the layer thicknesses. Let us denote the associated change in the xx component of the permittivity tensor eih by ed, where

8 >
:

0

for uðzn Þ > 0; zn < z < zn þ uðzn Þ; for uðzn Þ < 0; zn þ uðzn Þ < z < zn ;

ð27Þ

elsewhere:

These perturbations are shown schematically in Fig. 16 for the case in which eih is a real quantity. The perturbation ed(z) appears as a top hat shape. In the example shown, u(z1) is positive, leading to ed = e(1)  e(2) > 0. We must deal with the combined perturbation eih = epe + ed. 3.3. Solution of the wave equation We proceed by solving the wave equation corresponding to Eq. (25) with exx(z) = eh(z):

"

# @2 2 þ k eh ðzÞ E0 ðzÞ ¼ 0; @z2

ð28Þ

where E0 is the solution for Ex in the absence of strain. This can be done very straightforwardly by considering the boundary conditions at each interface and using a transfer matrix method [8,50,51]. We briefly review this method here. The solution for E0 in the nth layer has the form

an eikn Zn þ bn eikn Zn ; Fig. 15. A general multilayer structure consisting of N layers on a substrate. Each layer is considered to be optically isotropic before perturbation. We define z0 = 0.

pffiffiffiffiffiffiffi where Zn = z  zn1(n P 1), Z0 = z, z0 = 0, and kn ¼ eðnÞ k. The electric field amplitudes an and bn can be determined by the following

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

Fig. 16. Schematic diagram of the dielectric constant distributions in the presence of a longitudinal strain pulse in layers 1 and 2. The vertical dashed line in layer 2 shows the perturbed interface position. The top graph show the unperturbed distribution of the relative permittivity eh. The middle graph shows the change in permittivity epe caused by the photoelastic effect. The bottom plot shows the change in permittivity ed caused by the interface motion. Here eih = epe + ed. The values here are assumed to be real, and the magnitude of epe is greatly exaggerated.

procedure. The boundary conditions on E and H (=r  E/(ixl0)) at the first interface (z = 0) require continuity of the parallel components of these vectors. These conditions lead to the matrix equation



1

1

k0

k0



a0



 ¼

b0



1

1

k1

k1

a1 b1

;

or, in compact form, M0a0 = M1a1. The Fresnel equations for reflection at normal incidence immediately follow (see Figs. 4 and 5). At z = zn the appropriate relation is MnQnan = Mn+1an+1, where

 Mn ¼

1

1

kn

kn

;

Qn ¼

!

eikn dn

0

0

eikn dn

:

The matrix Qn accounts for the thickness dn of the nth layer (where n P 1). In order to calculate the matrix M that relates the fields incident on the sample to those transmitted to the substrate, that is a0 = Man+1, we iterate these equations to obtain

M ¼ M1 0

YN

1 1 MNþ1 : M Q M j j j j¼1

The reflectance of the whole structure is then simply given by r0 = b0/a0 = M21/M11. Furthermore, by stopping the above series at a given layer n, we may determine the electric field amplitudes an and bn for every layer, and hence determine E0(z). From Eq. (25), the x component of the electric field can be obtained from

"

# @2 2 ð Þ þ k e ðzÞ þ e ðzÞ EðzÞ ¼ 0: h ih @z2

where the approximation E0(z0 ) ffi E(z0 ) in the integral holds for firstorder perturbation theory. This relation can be verified by applying the operator @ 2/@z2 + k2eh(z) to both sides of Eq. (31) and making use of Eqs. (28) and (30). (Note that this operator does not act on the terms in the integral depending only on z0 .) Eq. (31) implies that G(z, z0 ) governs the response at z caused by a localized disturbance (i.e. a d-function change in permittivity) at z0 . The Green’s function can be found by considering its limiting properties at z = z0 and z = ±1, and by realizing that G obeys the same boundary conditions as an electric field at the interfaces. The details are given in Ref. [8]. The result for the region of interest is

Gðz; z0 Þ ¼

i eik0 z E0 ðz0 Þ for z0 > z; z < 0; 2k0 a0

pffiffiffiffiffiffiffi where k0 ¼ eð0Þ k is the wave number in medium 0. (It can be shown that the reciprocity relation G(z, z0 ) = G(z0 , z) holds, and this helps in deriving G [8].) The next step is to substitute for G in Eq. (31) at a point z < 0, including both contributions to eih. We obtain

EðzÞ ¼ a0 eik0 z þ b0 eik0 z Z 0 2 ik eik0 z 0 0 2 0 ð0 Þ þ P12 gðz0 Þ a0 eik0 z þ b0 eik0 z dz 2k0 a0 z N þ1 Z dn X 0 0 2 0 ðnÞ P12 gðz0 þ zn1 Þ an eikn z þ bn eikn z dz þ n¼1

ð29Þ

0

) Nþ1 X 2 þ ðan þ bn Þ ½eðn1Þ  eðnÞ uðzn1 Þ : n¼1

To do this, we define a Green’s function G(z, z0 ) as follows:

# @2 2 Gðz; z0 Þ ¼ dðz  z0 Þ: þ k e ðzÞ h @z2

The relative reflectance change is therefore given by

"

ð30Þ

The form for G will be given shortly. First let us express the solution of Eq. (29) in terms of G: 2

EðzÞ ¼ E0 ðzÞ þ k

Z

1 0

0

0

2

Z

1

1

n¼1

0

) Nþ1 X 2 ðn1Þ ðnÞ þ ðan þ bn Þ ½e  e uðzn1 Þ ;

0

Gðz; z Þeih ðz ÞEðz Þdz

1

ffi E0 ðzÞ þ k

Z 0 2 dr ik 0 0 2 0 ð0Þ ¼ P12 gðz0 Þ a0 eik0 z þ b0 eik0 z dz r0 2k0 a0 b0 z Nþ1 Z dn X 0 0 2 0 ðnÞ P 12 gðz0 þ zn1 Þ an eikn z þ bn eikn z dz þ ð32Þ

n¼1 0

Gðz; z0 Þeih ðz0 ÞE0 ðz0 Þdz ;

ð31Þ

where r0 = b0/a0 is the reflectance of the whole structure, and the point z ( 0 in Eq. (31), so that eih = d(z0  z00 ). The result is 2

2

EðzÞ  E0 ðzÞ ¼ k E0 ðz00 ÞGðz; z00 Þ ¼

ik E2 ðz00 Þeik0 z : 2k0 a0 0

As expected, G(z, z00 ) governs the response at z to a local change in permittivity at z00 . We also know that EðzÞ  E0 ðzÞ ¼ eik0 z db0 , where db0 is the change in the reflected electric field amplitude b0 due to the perturbation for a point z to the left of all perturbations. By ref00 00 erence to Fig. 9, E20 ðz00 Þ ¼ t 20 a20 e2ik1 z ¼ t 0~t0 a20 e2ik1 z k1 =k0 , where use has been made of the Fresnel equations. Using the relation r  r0 = db0/a0, and setting z00 = z0 as the position for the perturbation, we obtain Eq. (8) when F = 1, as expected. Incidentally, the relation 0 0 E0 ðz0 Þ ¼ t 0 a0 eik1 z ¼ 2k0 a0 eik1 z =ðk0 þ k1 Þ shows that for this simple case of two media,

Gðz; z0 Þ ¼

i 0 eiðk1 z k0 zÞ for z0 > z; z < 0: k0 þ k1

The same general theoretical method can also be applied to calculate the modulation in transmission through a multilayer [8]. 3.4. Light modulation in a transparent-metal photonic crystal An interesting example of the application of the above theory is the ultrafast generation of sound in a photonic crystal. We present here some preliminary results on a particular type of 1D photonic crystal in the form of a ‘transparent-metal’ structure [52]. It consists of a symmetric periodic structure with four unit cells, with each unit cell composed of a silver layer (15 nm thick) sandwiched between two identical dielectric TiO2 layers (32 nm thick), as shown in Fig. 17(a). (A thin 1 nm layer of Ti was used at the Ag–TiO2 interface to prevent oxidation [53]). Figure 17(b) shows the calculated optical reflection and transmission spectra. In spite of the total thickness of Ag in the sample being 120 nm, the sample has a surprisingly high transmission in a band around 400–700 nm, hence the naming as a transparentmetal structure. The experimental transmission spectrum was measured, and found to be nearly identical to that calculated. Picosecond laser ultrasonics experiments were carried out using 200 fs pump light pulses of wavelength 800 nm [54]. The pump light is absorbed in the Ag films, and leads to a transient strain distribution in the sample. This transient distribution can be calculated using the transfer matrix method considered above for the optical absorption of the pump light together with a stress

13

generation and propagation theory similar to that described in Section 2 [8]. Figure 18 shows a simulation of the strain distribution 50 ps and 100 ps after the arrival of the pump pulse at normal incidence from the top of the sample, taking optical and mechanical constants from the literature. The ultrasonic attenuation in the TiO2 films (varying quadratically with the acoustic frequency) is also taken into account. The shape of the strain pulse changes rapidly with time inside the films owing to multiple acoustic reflections. Figure 19 shows typical results for the reflectivity dR(t) using probe pulses of duration 200 fs and wavelength 430 nm. Also shown is a theoretical simulation based on Eq. (31), using optimized photoelastic constants and other constants from the literature [54]. Detailed analysis of the relative contributions to the signal shows that the high frequency oscillations in the signal are photoelastic in origin, whereas the lower frequency background signal arises from the interface displacements. The idea of modulating a photonic crystal with picosecond ultrasonic waves may be of interest for the development of ultrafast acousto-optic modulators. This has also been studied, for example, in opal structures [55,56]. The problem one faces is how to achieve an efficient optical modulation. As can be seen from the vertical scale in Fig. 19, the typical amplitude dR(t)  104 is too small for useful applications. We found that matters are not much improved at other probe wavelengths in the range 390– 430 nm investigated. However, it may be possible in the future to generate very high frequency ultrasonic waves electrically with much higher amplitudes [57], thus facilitating the design of such high frequency acousto-optic modulators.

Fig. 18. Calculated strain distribution in the ‘transparent-metal’ sample 50 ps and 100 ps after arrival of a 800 nm pump optical pulse from the top side of the sample at normal incidence. SUB means substrate.

Fig. 17. (a) Diagram of the ‘transparent-metal’ photonic crystal sample. (b) Calculated reflection and transmission spectra of this sample.

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

incidence conditions and is a known quantity. The wave equation then simplifies to 2 ½Lðkx Þ þ k ~eðzÞEðzÞ ¼ 0;

ð34Þ

where

0 B Lðkx Þ ¼ B @

Fig. 19. Plot of the measured change in reflectivity as a function of delay time for the ‘transparent-metal’ sample using 800 nm pump optical pulses and 430 nm probe pulses. The optical pulses are incident on the top side of the sample at normal incidence. The theoretical predictions according to Eq. (35) are also shown by the dotted line.

@ 2 [email protected]

0

0

@ 2 [email protected]  kx

0

ikx @[email protected]

0

kx

ikx @[email protected] 2

2

1 C C: A

4.2. Solution for the unperturbed case Consider first the unperturbed solution to Eq. (34) at the plane boundary of a vacuum and an isotropic solid. In this case,



exx ðzÞ ¼ eyy ðzÞ ¼ ezz ðzÞ ¼ eh ðzÞ ¼

1ðz < 0Þ

eðz > 0Þ

;

eij ðzÞ ¼ 0 for i – j: This geometry is sketched in Fig. 20(a). Since there is no spatial dependence of eh(z) = e in the region z > 0, let us define E(z) = E0(z) = E1exp(ikzz) in this unperturbed case. Eq. (34) has a solution for kz provided that

  ek2  k2  z   0    kx kz

Fig. 20. (a) Geometry for optical incidence on an isotropic solid with a plane interface from a vacuum. (b) The general solution of the wave equation for this problem has four wave vectors. The horizontal component kx, parallel to the interface, is a conserved quantity.

     ¼ 0: 0   2 2 ek  kx

0

kx kz

ek2  k2x  k2z 0

This is a fourth order equation in kz with four solutions, shown schematically in Fig. 20(b). (The values of kz are complex quantities in general for complex e.) The z component of these wave vectors are labelled by kjz, where j = 1, . . . , 4. So, in general (i.e. in the air or in the dielectric),

E0 ¼

4 X

aj ej expðikjz z þ ikx xÞ;

ð35Þ

j¼1

4. Detection at oblique optical incidence 4.1. The wave equation So far we have only dealt with normally-incident probe light, but in many experiments it is very useful to be able to work at a general angle of incidence. This presents advantages such as the ability to probe anisotropic materials effectively, to measure shear strain pulses, or to allow the separation of photoelastic and displacement contributions to the detected signals. The aim in this section is to analyse the case of oblique optical incidence in picosecond laser ultrasonics [21,24,45,58]. Our starting point is again the Maxwell0 s equations, discussed in Section 2. We first consider an isotropic solid with a plane interface with a vacuum. With oblique optical incidence, Eq. (24) for the spatially dependent part of the electric field is generalized to

20

1 0

1

where aj is the amplitude and ej is the electric polarization vector for mode j. The reason why kx is not indexed is that the boundary conditions require that kx is a conserved quantity. The general solutions for kjz are given in the vacuum (medium 0), by ð0Þ

ð1Þ

ð1Þ

00

k1z ¼ k2z ¼ k ;

ð0Þ

ð0Þ

0

k3z ¼ k4z ¼ k ;

ð1Þ

ð1Þ

00

k3z ¼ k4z ¼ k ;

qffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi qffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 0 2 2 00 2 2 where k ¼ k  kx and k ¼ ek  kx . We see immediately that

the choice of kx has constrained the angle of optical incidence h in the vacuum to tanh = kx/k0 . Each of these values of kz, when substituted in Eq. (33), give the associated electric polarizations in Eq. (35). The result is

ð0Þ

e1

ð33Þ   where ~eðzÞ ¼ eij is the 3  3 complex relative permittivity tensor pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi and k ¼ x e0 l0 is the vacuum wave number. Since the unperturbed solid is isotropic, and since perturbations in ~e do not break the lateral symmetry, we may without loss of generality always choose the directions of x and y so that ky = 0, @/@y = @ 2/@y2 = 0, and E = E(z) exp(ikxx). Here the value of kx is imposed by the optical

0

and in the dielectric (medium 1), by

3

@ 2 [email protected] @ 2 [email protected]@y @ 2 [email protected]@z r2 0 0 6B C B 2 C 2 7 2 [email protected] 0 r 0 A  @ @ [email protected]@x @ 2 [email protected] @ 2 [email protected]@z A þk ~eðzÞ5EðrÞ ¼ 0: @ 2 [email protected]@x @ 2 [email protected]@y @ 2 [email protected] 0 0 r2

ð0Þ

k1z ¼ k2z ¼ k ;

ð1Þ e1

0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 k k 1 1 B C ð0Þ B C ð0Þ B C ð0Þ ð0Þ ¼ @ 1 A; e 2 ¼ @ 0 A; e 3 ¼ e 1 ; e 4 ¼ @ 0 A; k k 0 kx kx 0 1 0 00 1 0 00 1 0 k k 1 B 1 B B C ð1Þ C ð1Þ C ð1Þ ð1Þ ¼ @ 1 A; e2 ¼ pffiffiffi @ 0 A; e3 ¼ e1 ; e4 ¼ pffiffiffi @ 0 A: k e k e 0 kx kx

Solving for the electric fields in the two media is now a matter of applying the boundary conditions on the fields. These can conveniently be expressed in matrix form

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15

O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

0

ð0Þ

ð0Þ

ð0Þ

ð0Þ

1

2 ½Lðkx Þ þ k ~eh ðzÞGðz; z0 Þ ¼ Idðz  z0 Þ;

e1x e2x e3x e4x C0 ð0Þ 1 B ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ C a1 B e1y e2y e3y e4y CB B CB ð0Þ C B





C a2 C B ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ C k2z e2x  k3z e3x  k4z e4x  CB B k1z e1x  C CB B ð0Þ C B [email protected] a3 A B ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ C B k e kx e2z kx e3z kx e4z C ð0Þ B x 1z A a4 @ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ ð0Þ k2z e2y k3z e3y k4z e4y k1z e1y 1 0 ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ e1x e2x e3x e4x C0 ð1Þ 1 B ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ C a1 B e1y e2y e3y e4y CB B CB ð1Þ C B





C a2 C B ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ C k1z e1x  k2z e2x  k3z e3x  k4z e4x  CB ¼B B ð1Þ C; B Ba C C C B ð1Þ ð1Þ @ 3 A ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ B k e kx e2z kx e3z kx e4z C C að1Þ B x 1z A @ 4 ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ ð1Þ k2z e2y k3z e3y k4z e4y k1z e1y

together with the above solutions for E0(z) to the equation 2 ½Lðkx Þ þ k ~eh ðzÞE0 ðzÞ ¼ 0;

where I is the 3  3 identity matrix. The perturbation to the permittivity can be written ~eih ¼ ~epe þ ~ed , where ~epe is caused by the photoelastic effect and ~ed by the displacement of the surface. From Eq. (26), we have

0

P12 ~epe ðzÞ ¼ gðzÞB @ 0 0

8 > < ð1  eÞI ~ed ¼ ðe  1ÞI > : 0

1

C 0 A; P 11

P12 0

for u < 0; u < z < 0; elsewhere:

(This represents the top hat distribution of Fig. 16 at the surface, which is drawn for the case of u > 0 at the 1–2 interface.) With identical reasoning to that leading to Eq. (31), we may write 2

EðzÞ ffi E0 ðzÞ þ k

Z

1

0

Gðz; z0 Þ~eih ðz0 ÞE0 ðz0 Þdz 1

2

ffi E0 ðzÞ þ k

Z

1

0

Gðz; z0 Þ~epe ðz0 ÞE0 ðz0 Þdz 1

2

þ k ð1  eÞuGðz; 0ÞE0 ðþ0Þ;

As a by-product of our efforts we have succeeded in deriving the Fresnel equations for oblique reflection from a medium with a complex permittivity. Obtaining the total fields from Eq. (35) is now straightforward as all the e and a vectors are known. Setting a1 = 1 and a2 = 0, for s-polarization we find

ð36Þ

ð37Þ

4.3. Solution for the perturbed case Equation (33) to be solved is 2 ½Lðkx Þ þ k ð~eh ðzÞ þ ~eih ðzÞÞEðzÞ ¼ 0;

where as in Section 2, we have again split ~eðzÞ into homogeneous and inhomogeneous parts. This equation can be solved with the help of a 3  3 Green’s matrix G(z, z0 ) that satisfies

ð39Þ

where the last term in Eq. (39) has been specifically written for the case of outward motion (u < 0) in which part of medium 1 penetrates into the region of medium 0. The values for z just greater and less than zero (z = +0 and z = 0) should be distinguished because of discontinuities in the field Ez and in the Green’s function G at the interface, a problem that does not arise for normal incidence: the choice of E0(+0) ensures the continuity in the z component of E0 at z = 0 because medium 1 is present at this point if u < 0; in addition, the choice of G(z, 0) is a result of G(z, z0 ) being integrated over z0 in medium 0, as it should be for u < 0 (since the integral should be evaluated with G obtained under the same conditions as the unperturbed problem for which u = 0). In the case u > 0 one should use E0(0) and G(z, +0) instead. It turns out, however, that G(z, +0)E0(0) = G(z, 0)E0(+0) and thus Eq. (39) can be used for any u regardless of its polarity. The required Green’s matrices are given by

whereas setting a1 = 0 and a2 = 1 for p-polarization,

8 0 0 1 0 0 1 > k k > > 0 > ik0 z B C C eik z B > > þ rp e k @ 0 A for z < 0; > k @ 0 A > > < kx kx 0 00 1 E0 ðzÞ ¼ > k > > ik00 z > C > e pffi B > t @ 0 A for z > 0: > p > k e > : kx

0

for u > 0; 0 < z < u;

00

k k 0 00 ; k þk 0 ek  k00 rp ¼ 0 ; ek þ k00 0 2k ts ¼ 0 00 ; k þk pffiffiffi 0 2 ek tp ¼ 0 : ek þ k00 rs ¼

0 1 8 0 >

> 0 > ik0 z B C > > e þ r s eik z @ 1 A for z < 0; > > > < 0 0 1 E0 ðzÞ ¼ > 0 > > > 00 B C > > t s eik z @ 1 A for z > 0; > > : 0

0

where as before, g is the longitudinal component of strain (g = gzz, all other components being zero). From Eq. (27), we have, for the xx, yy, and zz components of ~ed ,

where from top to bottom, the continuity of Ex, Ey, Dz (equivalent to By) and Bx have been used at z = 0. A short form of this equation is A0a0 = A1a1. Setting a0 = (a1, a2, a1rs, a2rp) and a1 = (a1ts, a2tp, 0, 0), where a1 is the s-polarized component of the incident electric field and a2 is the p-polarized component, the relation a0 ¼ A1 0 A 1 a1 allows us to solve for the amplitude reflection coefficients rs, rp and transmission coefficients ts, tp: 0

ð38Þ

Gðz; z0 ; kx Þ ¼

80 ik0 k00 > 2 00 0 > > B k ð k þ ek Þ > > B > > B > 0 > B > > > @ ik00 kx > > > 2 00 0 > > k ð k þ ek Þ > 0 0 00 0 > > ik ðk  e k Þ > > > 2 00 0 > B 2k ðk þek Þ > > >B > > B 0 > > 0; C A

0

ikx ðk00 ek0 Þ 2k2 ðk00 þek0 Þ

iðk0 k00 Þ 2k0 ðk0 þk00 Þ

0 2

00

0

1 C C ik0 ðz0 þzÞ Ce C A

ikx ðk ek Þ ikx ðk ek Þ 0 > 2k2 k0 ðk00 þek0 Þ 2k2 ðk00 þek0 Þ > > 0 1 > > ikx ik0 0 > 0 2k > 2 2 sgnðz  zÞ > 2k > B C ik0 jz0 zj > i > Ce > 0 0 þB > 2k0 @ A > > > 2 > ikx ikx 0 > 0 > 2 sgnðz  zÞ 2 0 > 2k 2k k > 1 > 0 > > 0 0 0 > > > B C 0 > > @ 0 0 0 A dðzk2zÞ for z < 0; z0 < 0: > > : 0 0 1

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16

O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

These ranges of z and z0 suffice to solve the problem in hand. These Green’s matrices are also discussed in Refs. [24,59]. The reciprocity relation Gðz; z0 ; kx Þ ¼ GT ðz0 ; z; kx Þ can be shown to hold, where T means the transpose of the matrix. The next step is to substitute for G into Eq. (39) at a point z < 0. The result for s-polarization, including time dependence, is

Z 1 0 2 00 0 dr s ðtÞ 2ik k P 12 ¼ 0 gðz0 ; tÞe2ik z dz0 þ 2ik0 uðtÞ 00 0 00 r0 ðk  k Þðk þ k Þ 0 Z 0 00 0 2ik P12 1 gðz0 ; tÞe2ik z dz0 þ 2ik0 uðtÞ; ¼ 1e 0

ð40Þ

and the result for p-polarization is 0

2

002

dr p ðtÞ 2ik ðk P12  kx P 11 Þ ¼ 002 02 r0 k  e2 k

Z

1

00 0

gðz0 ; tÞe2ik z dz0 þ 2ik0 uðtÞ;

ð41Þ

0

qffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi qffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 0 2 2 00 2 2 where the components of kz ; k ¼ k  kx and k ¼ ek  kx , are

determined by kx, e and k = x/c. Eqs. (40) and (41) can be shown to be valid for either sign of u. At normal incidence, for which pffiffiffi 0 kx = 0, k0 = k, and k ¼ k e, both of these equations reduce to

drðtÞ 2ikP 12 ¼ r0 1e

Z

1 0

gðz ; tÞe

pffi 2i ekz0

0

dz þ 2ikuðtÞ:

0

~ dn ~ =dg, this agrees with Eq. (9). The equation for Given that P12 ¼ 2n drp/r0 involves both photoelastic constants P12 and P11 because E has both x and z components, whereas the equation for drs/r0, involves only P12 because in this case E has only a y component. Both equations have the same integral term as Eq. (9), but the difference lies in the complex prefactor and the wave number in the exponential that affect the time dependence of the observed signals (i.e. q or d/). The response to a strain pulse being reflected from the free surface inside the solid is thus qualitatively similar to the case for normal incidence. The frequency of the oscillations in the oscillatory term is, however, reduced to the value fn = 2nvlcosh/k, where h is the angle of optical incidence. Experiments on isotropic solids with oblique probe incidence allow us extra degrees of freedom. It has been suggested, for example, that by measuring both drs/r0 and drp/r0 one should be able to experimentally separate the photoelastic and surface displacement contributions [45]. The suggested method has been implemented as a interferometric setup to observe the surface displacement directly without contamination by the photoelastic effect [46]. Resolving the surface displacement contribution / u(t) has the advantage of directly probing the shape (i.e. the integral) of the strain pulse in the solid. This allows ultrafast diffusion processes to be investigated accurately. Another useful application is in the tomographic reconstruction of picosecond acoustic strain propagation by scanning the angle of probe incidence h, in which a modified oblique-incidence theory is used to account for incidence from a medium with a relative permittivity different from unity [60].

theoretical description of shear strain detection using a Jones matrix formalism has been given in Ref. [61]. Consider as an example an anisotropic opaque substrate coated with a transparent isotropic film. This facilitates the analysis of the photoelastic detection process in the isotropic film, which supports only pure shear or pure longitudinal modes (as opposed to quasilongitudinal or quasishear modes of mixed polarization). In general, a z-propagating strain pulse in the isotropic film (originating from optical excitation of the opaque substrate) may have nonzero shear strain components g4 = 2gyz and g5 = 2gxz, and a longitudinal component g3 = gzz. These can modulate the relative permittivity tensor of the film according to the photoelastic effect through DeI = PIJgJ [see discussion after Eq. (26)], an equation that now includes off-diagonal components. With the same notation as Sections 2 and 3, and taking the photoelastic tensor for an isotropic solid [38],

0 ~epe ¼ B @

P12 g3

0

0

P 12 g3

P44 g5 0

P 44 g4

0 B þ P44 @ 0

P44 g5

1

0

C B P44 g4 A ¼ @ P11 g3 1

P12 g3

0

0

1

0

P 12 g3

0

0

0

P11 g3

C A

g5 g4 C A;

0 0

g5 g4

ð42Þ

0

where we have used e1 = exx, e5 = exz, etc., and P11, P12, and P44 = (P11  P12)/2 are the photoelastic tensor components for an isotropic material (as explained in Section 2). Since the coupling of ~e to shear strain gyz or gxz, [the second term in Eq. (42)] is offdiagonal and involves the suffix z, it will only couple to the z component of the probe light electric field [as can be seen from Eq. (34)]. Therefore, p-polarized probe light must be involved (either in incidence or in reflection) to detect shear waves in isotropic materials under oblique incidence conditions. We can use Eq. (39) to calculate the perturbed electric fields corresponding to the shear strain assuming, as before, that the x axis lies within the plane of incidence. For s-polarization, we obtain 0

EðzÞ ffi E0 ðzÞ 

ik0 z

0

k

0

1

2ikk kx P44 e 1B C @ 0 A 0 00 0 00 ðk þ k Þðek þ k Þ k kx

Z

1 0

00 0

g4 ðz0 Þe2ik z dz0 ; ð43Þ

Whereas for p-polarization, we obtain

0 1 0 Z 0 0 00 0 2ikk kx P44 eik z B C 1 EðzÞ ffi E0 ðzÞ   0 g4 ðz0 Þe2ik z dz0 ; 00  0 00 @ 1 A k þ k ðek þ k Þ 0 0

ð44Þ

where Eqs. (36) and (37) for z < 0 respectively determine E0(z) in Eqs. (43) and (44). These equations imply the following,: (i) only g4 shear strain can be detected; (ii) the strain g4 scatters s-polarized to p-polarized light and vice versa, as shown in Fig. 21; and (iii) a

4.4. Detection of off-diagonal perturbations to the permittivity tensor For arbitrarily cut anisotropic materials the allowed acoustic modes for a general propagation direction have in general both longitudinal and shear strain components. It is possible to generate these shear components as a consequence of the broken symmetry. The thermal expansion tensor does not have to be anisotropic for this to occur. If shear components are present one has to deal with off-diagonal elements in the perturbed permittivity tensor. Without going into great detail we will briefly review this problem with relation to picosecond shear pulse detection [21,58]. A general treatment of transient light scattering including shear strain detection has been given in Ref. [24] based on Green’s functions. Another

Fig. 21. Schematic diagram showing how a shear strain g4 = 2gyz couples spolarized light to p-polarized light and vice versa in an isotropic material. This example shows a shear pulse returning to the surface of a thin isotropic film on a substrate.

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O. Matsuda et al. / Ultrasonics xxx (2014) xxx–xxx

first order change in R (dR / g4) can be obtained only by allowing the incident and reflected light to interfere (otherwise dR / g24 Þ. This interference is straightforward to arrange by mixing a portion of the incident probe light with the scattered light. In the case of plane shear waves reflecting at normal incidence from a free surface in an isotropic medium, there is no normal surface displacement, and so we do not have to contend with the contribution due to ~ed in this case. The analysis for optical strain detection in an anisotropic substrate is more complex. In general the shear strain can perturb both the diagonal and off-diagonal components of the permittivity tensor. Therefore there are no strict conditions on the choice of polarization for the probe light for the detection of shear strain in this case. For anisotropic media, an extra contribution to the perturbation of the permittivity arises because of induced local rotations of the solid that accompany any strain. This rotation contribution must also be taken into account in the theory. In addition, acoustic mode conversion at the interface needs to be accounted for. A general analysis method incorporating all these effects has been discussed using the Green’s function for an arbitrary anisotropic multilayer system [24]. The detection of shear strain was experimentally verified in a variety of systems [21,62]. Shear strain arising from 3D propagation effects has also been detected [25,63]. Shear strain wave propagation in liquids has also been studied, following on from similar experiments for longitudinal waves in mercury [64,65]. One can expect more interesting developments in this field. 5. Conclusions In conclusion, this paper reviews the fundamentals of the generation and detection of picosecond strain pulses in solids. We explained in detail the shape of the acoustic echoes in both amplitude and phase for longitudinal-wave generation at the free surface of an opaque isotropic solid and for detection with normally-incident optical probe pulses. We extended the detection theory to isotropic multilayers using a Green’s function method, and applied this approach to a photonic crystal. The detection theory was further extended to handle probe light at oblique incidence, and this theory was also applied to the detection of shear waves. Not everything could be covered in this article. For example, one area of rapid development is the field of nonlinear picosecond laser ultrasonics, involving the generation and detection of picosecond acoustic solitons or shock waves in crystalline solids using ultrashort light pulses [66–70]. Another area is the study of mechanical contacts with laser picosecond ultrasonics [71,72]. Work in picosecond laser ultrasonics is progressing rapidly, and we can look forward to fascinating developments in this field. Acknowledgements We thank Vitali Gusev, Bernard Perrin and Motonobu Tomoda for stimulating discussions on this subject, and Jeremy Baumberg for suggesting the two-dimensional echo plots. We also thank Eitaro Mizunuma for experimental support and Francesca Sarto for sample growth. References [1] [2] [3] [4]

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Please cite this article in press as: O. Matsuda et al., Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics, Ultrasonics (2014), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/ j.ultras.2014.06.005

Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics.

The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to picosecond laser ultrasonics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be ge...
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