International Journal of Health Sciences, Qassim University, Vol. 10, No. 2 (April-June 2016)

Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in Renal Allograft - a case report Fahad Saleh Alhajjaj, 1 Farooq Pasha 2 1 2

Department of Surgery, Unaizah College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Qassim University; Department of Emergency Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Abstract Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare disease with devastating outcomes in healthy adults. It may affect renal allografts resulting in higher mortality rate, graft loss and permanent dialysis. Presentation is highly variable and non-specific requiring higher degree of suspension. Optimal management of EPN is controversial with recent case reports challenging a previously suggested management pathway. We report a case of a 71-year-old man who presented in septic shock who was diagnosed with EPN in an allograft kidney in the emergency department, treated with antibiotics and medical support but died on the 6th day of presentation. Based on the scarce literature of EPN in allograft kidneys, a nephrectomy might be indicated in a similar patient presentation.

Correspondence to:

Fahad Saleh Alhajjaj, Department of Surgery, Unaizah College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Qassim University, P.O. Box 991 Unaizah, Alqassim 51911, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Tel: +966163640424, Fax: +966163649074, Mobile: +966503134039 [email protected]

Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in Renal Allograft - a case report

Introduction Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a severe infection resulting in microbial gas formation and necrosis of the renal parenchyma. The majority of cases are associated with the presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and gender-age prevalence of middle aged females. (1) EPN in allograft kidneys present multiple challenges to clinicians: subtle presentations, controversial management options, and high mortality rate. Case report A 71-year-old male presented to the emergency department complaining of shortness of breath, constipation and vomiting for three days with no fever, cough, abdominal pain or chest pain. He is known to have DM and received a kidney allograft five months ago with no major complications. The patient looked sick with a GCS of 15/15. He was self-voiding with no dysuria. His vitals

where: Temp. 36˚C, HR 91bpm, RR 30, O2 Sat 100% on 2l of O2, BP 89/55 mmHg; and he was not in pain. The patient had a scar on his right iliac fossa with a palpable tender mass beneath it. Standard resuscitation started with administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics; and an abdominal X-ray was done (figure.1). Significant lab results were WBCs 8×109/l, platelets 85×109/l, BUN 33.6 µmol/L, creatinine 310µmol/l and lactate 1.41 mmol/l. The patient underwent a CT of the abdomen without contrast revealing a markedly enlarged transplanted kidney showing consistent features of EPN with air tracking to the urinary bladder, other surrounding tissues and pelvic veins. Clinical instability precluded transport to the OR for either nephrectomy or percutaneous drainage. Supportive management was continued but the patient went into asystolic arrest and died on the 6th day of admission.

Figure 1: lateral decubetous film at presentation showing air-fluid level in the urinary bladder.

Discussion All of the reported cases of EPN in allografts presented in acute kidney injury and almost all of them (24 cases 88.5%) had a prior diagnosis of DM. CT is the gold standard for diagnosing EPN with the advantage of differentiating EPN from more common abdominal emergencies with similar presentations which made it the

basis of classifying EPN, guide management and estimate prognosis. Treatment of EPN is controversial, the sicker the patient the more likely he will get treated medically creating a selection bias that precludes real potential of conservative management.

312

313

Fahad Saleh Alhajjaj, 1 Farooq Pasha 2

Huang and Tseng (2) classified EPN and recommended therapeutic pathways but all patients with allografts will fall in class 4 in their classification warranting a nephrectomy. AlGeizawi et al. (3) suggested a specific staging system for EPN in allografts. Total of five cases did not appear in their report, one appears to have had been missed by the authors which will fall in stage three but was managed successfully with antibiotics and PCD. A similar scenario is observed later with a case report in 2012. Two other cases including the current report were managed with antibiotics alone while in stage 3 and resulted in death. The only case that appeared with a stage 2 disease, after their review, was treated successfully with antibiotics and PCD. (4) In conclusion, we report an EPN case in an allograft kidney which was unsuccessfully treated with antibiotics and medical management. Current literature suggests a nephrectomy might be a lifesaving procedure in a similar patient presentation.

References: 1. Pontin AR, Barnes RD. Current management of emphysematous pyelonephritis. Nat Rev Urol. 2009; 6:2729. 2. Huang JJ, Tseng CC. Emphysematous pyelonephritis: clinicoradiological classification, management, prognosis, and pathogenesis. Arch Intern Med. 2000; 160:797-805. 3. Al-Geizawi SMT, Farney AC, Rogers J, Assimos D, Requarth JA, Doares W, et al. Renal allograft failure due to emphysematous pyelonephritis: successful non-operative management and proposed new classification scheme based on literature review. Transpl Infect Dis. 2010; 12:543-50. 4. Vivek V, Panda A, Devasia A. Emphysematous pyelonephritis in a renal transplant recipient--is it possible to salvage the graft? Ann Transplant Q Polish Transplant Soc. 2011; 17:138-41.

Emphysematous Pyelonephritis in Renal Allograft - a case report.

Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare disease with devastating outcomes in healthy adults. It may affect renal allografts resulting in higher m...
239KB Sizes 0 Downloads 19 Views

Recommend Documents


Extensive emphysematous pyelonephritis in a renal allograft: case report and review of literature.
Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is an acute, severe necrotizing infection of the renal parenchyma and perirenal tissue, which results in the presence of gas within the renal parenchyma, collecting system, or perinephric tissue. EPN of renal allogr

Emphysematous pyelonephritis: a case report.
Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is an acute necrotic infection of the kidney which is characterized by the presence of gas. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and obstruction of the urinary tract are the main predisposing factors and Escherichia Coli i

Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Hepatic Portal Venous Gas: Case Report.
Emphysematous pyelonephritis is a rare life-threatening condition caused by a severe acute necrotising infection of the renal parenchyma and its perinephric tissues, and it is commonly seen in diabetic patients. There is a rare association between em

A case series of emphysematous pyelonephritis.
Introduction. Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is an uncommon infection characterized by gas in the renal parenchyma and surrounding tissues. It is rapidly progressive, requiring appropriate therapy to salvage the infected kidney. Case Description.

A Rare Case of Pneumoureter: Emphysematous Pyelitis versus Emphysematous Pyelonephritis.
Emphysematous pyelitis is a rare benign entity which is defined as isolated gas production in the pelvicalyceal system, ureters or in the urinary bladder as a consequence of acute bacterial renal infection. In this case report we present a case with

Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Renal Artery Pseudoaneurysm.
Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute infection of the renal parenchyma and perinephric tissues caused by gas-forming microorganisms, resulting in the radiographic presence of gas in the kidney, collecting system, and surrounding spaces. Here we p

A rare case of emphysematous pyelonephritis in a renal transplant patient.
Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare life-threatening complication of a properly functioning renal allograft leading to potential graft loss and hemodialysis. Currently, no clear management guidelines exist in these clinically challenging imm