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Dental trauma: prevalence and risk factors in schoolchildren Goettems ML, Torriani DD, Hallal PC, Correa MB, Demarco FF. Dental trauma: prevalence and risk factors in schoolchildren. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2014. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Abstract – Objectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of traumatic injury to the permanent incisors in 8- to 12-year-old children and to test associations between dental trauma and nutritional status and physical activity level, with adjustment for demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial variables. Differences in risk factors between sexes were also assessed. Methods: Two-stage cluster sampling was used to select 1210 children in 20 public and private schools in Pelotas, Brazil, for study participation. Dental trauma was assessed using the O’Brien criteria. Parents provided information about socioeconomic characteristics and their children’s history of trauma in early childhood via questionnaire. Children were interviewed to obtain demographic and psychosocial information and to assess physical activity level. Anthropometric measures were collected for body mass index calculation. Hierarchical Poisson regression was used for data analyses. Results: The prevalence of dental trauma was 12.6% [95% confidence interval (CI), 10.8– 14.7%] in the entire sample; it increased with age from 7.2% at 8 years to 21.5% at 12 years. In the adjusted analysis, dental trauma was more prevalent in boys [prevalence ratio (PR) = 0.71; 95% CI, 0.50–0.99], older children (PR = 3.57; 95% CI, 1.73–7.34), those with inadequate lip coverage (PR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.22– 3.38), and those with histories of trauma in the primary dentition (PR = 2.60; 95% CI, 1.80–3.75). In a sex-stratified analysis, dental trauma was more prevalent in overweight/obese boys (PR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10–2.92). No significant association was found with socioeconomic variables, psychosocial characteristics, physical activity level, or school retention among boys or girls. Conclusions: The pronounced increase in the prevalence of dental trauma with age highlights the need to establish preventive strategies among schoolchildren. The risk of dental injury was increased in overweight/obese boys and children with histories of dental trauma in early childhood, confirming the existence of accident-prone children.

Traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) may be accidental or intentional and can occur at any age. Dental trauma in infancy and childhood is particularly relevant because of the economic costs of treatment, long-term esthetic and/or functional impacts on oral health, and possibility of prevention (1). Given these factors and its high prevalence, dental trauma in children has been recognized as a public health problem. This irreversible pathology has deservedly gained more attention, especially in the last decade (2). Studies conducted in nearly 30 countries have doi: 10.1111/cdoe.12113

Marılia Le~ao Goettems1, Dione Dias Torriani1, Pedro Curi Hallal2, Marcos Britto Correa3 and Flavio Fernando Demarco4 1 Department of Social and Preventive Dentistry, Post-Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil, 2 Post-Graduate Programs in Epidemiology and Physical Education, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil, 3Department of Operative Dentistry, Post-Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil, 4 Post-Graduate Programs in Dentistry and Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

Key words: body mass index; children; dental trauma; epidemiology; physical activity Marılia Le~ ao Goettems, Rua Goncßalves Chaves, 457, CEP 96015-000, Centro Pelotas, RS, Brazil Tel/Fax: +55-53-330533317 e-mail: [email protected] Submitted 18 March 2013; accepted 10 May 2014

reported TDI prevalences ranging from 2.4% (3, 4) to 58.6% (5). This wide difference in prevalence is attributable to study population characteristics, including age range, as well as the criteria used to diagnose TDI. Variables potentially associated with dental trauma have been investigated extensively worldwide (2, 4, 6), and some are commonly mentioned as known risk factors. Most studies have found a persistent sex-based difference in the occurrence of dental trauma, with boys being significantly more prone, despite the diminution of this difference

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over time (7). Occlusal traits, including accentuated overjet and incompetent lip coverage, have also been shown to predispose children to TDI (8). On the other hand, conflicting results regarding the influences of socioeconomic conditions (5, 9), biological characteristics (10, 11), and behavioral variables (12) highlight the need for further research. Obesity is one of the several independent risk factors for fracture. It has been associated consistently with decreased mobility in children, and the risk of falling during daily activities is reportedly higher in overweight and obese children due to difficulties with balance (13). Although it has been linked to an elevated risk of nonfatal unintentional injury (14), the effect of obesity on the occurrence of TDI remains to be examined (7). Whereas obese subjects could be less exposed to traumatic injury because they tend to be sedentary (15), they have been suggested to be more prone to falls, collision, and related injury (12). The effect of physical activity habits on falls and collisions that cause TDI is also controversial (16, 17), similar to what occurs with nutritional status. Regardless of weight, some children have shown to be accident prone and suffer multiple episodes of dental trauma (18), but the association of trauma in the primary dentition with injury recurrence in the permanent teeth has not been investigated. Knowledge about the prevalence and risk factors of dental injury is important to help establish preventive strategies and identify treatment needs in a given population, as well as for comparison with the results of other studies conducted throughout the world. Thus, this cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of traumatic injury in the permanent incisors of 8- to 12-year-olds in Pelotas, southern Brazil, and to test associations between dental trauma and nutritional status, as well as other potentially related factors (e.g., sex, age, occlusal traits, physical activity level, sports practice, parental education level, and family income and structure). Differences in risk factors between sexes were also assessed.

Materials and methods Population and sample selection This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010 with schoolchildren in Pelotas, a southern Brazilian city near the borders with Uruguay and Argentina. The city has an estimated population of 330 000 inhabitants (19), with 25 628 children aged

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8–12 years enrolled in 25 private and 91 public schools. The minimum sample size needed for this study was calculated using the following parameters and estimates: estimated 10% occurrence rate of dental trauma (9), 3% margin of error, 95% confidence level, and 20% overenrollment to cover nonresponse. As cluster sample selection was used, the estimated design effect was 2. These calculations indicated that the minimum sample size was 922 children. Study participants were recruited from 20 private and public elementary schools, selected randomly with consideration of the number of children per school and proportional to school type in the city. In each school, all children aged 8– 12 years in grades 2–6 were invited to participate. Detailed information on the methodology of this survey has been reported elsewhere (20).

Data collection The following data were collected: questionnaire for parents: A questionnaire and informed consent form for parents were sent via the children at the beginning of the study. The questionnaire solicited information about family income (collected in continuous levels, categorized in quartiles) and maternal education (≥8 or 8 3 Adequate Inadequate Not overweight Overweight/obese ≥300

Dental trauma: prevalence and risk factors in schoolchildren.

This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of traumatic injury to the permanent incisors in 8- to 12-year-old children and to test a...
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