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Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel Stefanie A. Kring a

a b

b

b

, Xiaoyan Xia , Susan E. Powers & Michael R. Twiss

a b

Department of Biology , Clarkson University , Potsdam , NY , 13699 , USA

b

Institute for a Sustainable Environment , Clarkson University , Potsdam , NY , 13699 , USA Published online: 16 May 2013.

To cite this article: Stefanie A. Kring , Xiaoyan Xia , Susan E. Powers & Michael R. Twiss (2013) Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel, Environmental Technology, 34:13-14, 1973-1981, DOI: 10.1080/09593330.2013.795985 To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2013.795985

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Environmental Technology, 2013 Vol. 34, Nos. 13–14, 1973–1981, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2013.795985

Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel Stefanie A. Kringa,b , Xiaoyan Xiab , Susan E. Powersb and Michael R. Twissa,b∗ a Department

of Biology, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA; b Institute for a Sustainable Environment, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699, USA

Downloaded by [McMaster University] at 07:29 03 December 2014

(Received 28 November 2012; final version received 28 March 2013 ) Zooplankton biomass productivity was estimated for two 64,000 m3 (1.7 ha) facultative aerated wastewater treatment lagoons to evaluate potential biodiesel production from zooplankton biomass. Lagoons were monitored bi-weekly during summer 2010. Lipid accumulated by crustacean zooplankton was considered the most efficient means by which to collect lipid produced by phytoplankton owing to the greater ease in the collection of these organisms (>0.153 mm) compared with unicellular algae (size

Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel.

Zooplankton biomass productivity was estimated for two 64,000 m3 (1.7 ha) facultative aerated wastewater treatment lagoons to evaluate potential biodi...
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