CORRECTION

Correction: Association of Anaplasma marginale Strain Superinfection with Infection Prevalence within Tropical Regions Elizabeth J. Castañeda-Ortiz, Massaro W. Ueti, Minerva Camacho-Nuez, Juan J. Mosqueda, Michelle R. Mousel, Wendell C. Johnson, Guy H. Palmer

In Fig 1, Nayarit and Jalisco were inadvertently reversed. All other references and data for the study sites are correct. Please view the correct Fig 1 here.

OPEN ACCESS Citation: Castañeda-Ortiz EJ, Ueti MW, CamachoNuez M, Mosqueda JJ, Mousel MR, Johnson WC, et al. (2015) Correction: Association of Anaplasma marginale Strain Superinfection with Infection Prevalence within Tropical Regions. PLoS ONE 10(5): e0129415. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0129415 Published: May 28, 2015 Copyright: © 2015 Castañeda-Ortiz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0129415 May 28, 2015

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Fig 1. Study sites. A) Prevalence of infection as determined using serology and nested PCR and B) Geographic location of the herds in Mexico. The location of Santiago Ixcuintla, Nayarit is 21°48’N, 105°12’ W and Tapalpa, Jalisco is 19° 36’ N, 103° 36’ W. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0129415.g001

Reference 1.

Castañeda-Ortiz EJ, Ueti MW, Camacho-Nuez M, Mosqueda JJ, Mousel MR, Johnson WC, et al. (2015) Association of Anaplasma marginale Strain Superinfection with Infection Prevalence within Tropical Regions. PLoS ONE 10(3): e0120748. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0120748 PMID: 25793966

PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0129415 May 28, 2015

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Correction: Association of Anaplasma marginale Strain Superinfection with Infection Prevalence within Tropical Regions.

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