PROGRAM

Twelfth Annual Meeting of The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel ATLANTA, GEORGIA AUGUST 28-3 1, 1990

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990 OPENING ADDRESS Armen H. Tashjian, Ir., M.D.

8:OO A.M.

MATRIX PROTEINS

8 ~ 1 5A.M.1O:OO A.M.

CHAIRPERSONS-Jane Aubin Stephen M. Krane

8:15 A.M.

1.

ANALYSIS O F PROTEIN-DNA INTERACTIONS IN AN UPSTREAM REGION OF THE RAT a 1 COLLAGEN PROMOTER. M. Kronenberg, D. Pavlin, D. Rowe, A. Lichtler, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

8:30 A.M.

2.

DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION AND HORMONAL REGULATION OF MATRIX GLA PROTEIN GENE EXPRESSION IN MAMMALIAN OSTEOBLASTS AND CHONDROCYTES. I. Barone, T. Owen, C. Stein, /. lian, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA

8145 A.M.

3.

TRANSGENIC MOUSE LINE EXPRESSING AN ALPHA 1 COLLAGEN PROMOTER CONSTRUCT IN A TISSUE SPECIFIC MANNER. D. Pavlin, S. Clark, D. Rowe, A. lichtler, H. Thomas, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

9:OO A.M.

4.

AMINO-TERMINAL SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF PEPTIDES GENERATED FROM THE CALCIUM-DEPENDENT ACIDIC PHOSPHOLIPID-BINDING PROTEINS OF MATRIX VESICLES: SEQUENCE HOMOLOGY WITH ANCHORIN CII AND LIPOCORTIN II. 6. Cenge, I. Wu, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

9:15 A.M.

5.

DNA SEQUENCE IN MURINE SECRETED PHOSPHOPROTEIN I GENE CONFERS RESPONSIVENESS TO 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D. M. Noda, R. Vogel, A. Craig, D. Denhardt, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ

9:30 A.M.

6.

HUMAN OSTEOPONTIN 2: EVIDENCE THAT OSTEOPONTIN(S)IS A MULTI-GENE FAMILY. 1. Kerr, 1. Fisher, /. Termine, M. Young, NIDR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

9:45 A.M.

7

RGD CONTAINING SEQUENCES OF OSTEOPONTIN A N D BSP II PRODUCE IMMEDIATE CELL SIGNALS AND EFFECT OSTEOCLAST ADHESION. A. Teti, P. Ross, A. Miyauchi, S. Teitelbaum, K. Hruska, ). Alvarez, M. Crano, S. Colucci, P. Gehron-Robey, A. Zambonin-Zallone, Institute of Human Anatomy, Bari, Italy, Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, and NIDR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

1O:OO A.M.10:15 A.M.

Coffee Break

10~15A.M.12:15 P.M.

CALCITONIN AND RELATED PEPTlDES/PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PEPTIDE CHAIRPERSONS-William J. Burtis Cary W . Cooper

10:15 A.M.

8.

CHARACTERIZATION OF A C-CELL SPECIFIC ENHANCER OF CALCITONIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION. S. Peleg, R. Abruzzese, R. Cagel, VA Medical Center, and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

10:30 A.M.

9.

AMYLIN: A NEW BONE-CONSERVING HORMONE FROM THE PANCREAS: IN VlVO AND IN VITRO STUDIES O N POTENCY AND MODE OF ACTION. M. Zaidi, B. Moonga, M. Chatei, S. Cilbey, 5. Wimalawansa, S. Bloom, 1. Maclntyre, H. Datta, St. George’s Hospital, and Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK

10:45 A.M.

10.

CELL-SPECIFIC IN VITRO PROCESSING OF HUMAN CALCITONINKGRP PRErnRNA. C. Cote, 5. Berget, 1. Nguyen, R. Cagel, Baylor College of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Houston, TX

11 :00 A.M.

11.

CALCITONIN INCREASES TRANSCRIPTION OF HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN. j . Gerardi, C. Eldridge,). Zajac, University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, Australia

11:15 A.M.

12.

POTENTIAL ROLE FOR PTH-RELATED PEPTIDE IN EGG CALCIFICATION: THE STIMULATION OF PTH-RELATED PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS BY THE SHELL GLAND IS CORRELATED WITH EGG MOVEMENT D O W N THE AVIAN OVIDUCT. M. Thiede, R. McKee, W. Crasser, R. Leach, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, and Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

11 :30 A.M.

13.

INTRAUTERINE OCCUPANCY CONTROLS EXPRESSION OF THE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE GENE IN GRAVID RAT MYOMETRIUM. A. Daifotis, E. Weir, M. Brines, W. Burtis, K. Ikeda, B. Dreyer, A. Broadus, M. Thiede, Yale University, New Haven, CT, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

11 :45 A.M.

14.

CHARACTERISTICS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE A N D PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE STIMULATED ADENYLATE CYCLASE ACTIVITY IN H U M A N KERATINOCYTE CELL LINES. 1. Henderson, R. Kremer, ). Rhim, D. Coltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada, and National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

42-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

12:oo

15.

NOON

PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE: A ROLE IN FETAL DEVELOPMENT, C. Moniz, P. Quirke, A. Malik, A. Chatoo, /. Triffitt, P. Burton, Kings College, London, Leeds University, Leeds, and Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, UK

AWARD WINNING YOUNG INVESTIGATOR POSTERS

12:15 P.M.2:30 P.M.

The following posters will be prominently displayed in the Exhibit Hall. They will be attended for the entire viewing period on Tuesday, August 28, 1990 and will remain posted for the duration of the meeting. These posters are noted with an (*) to the left of the number in the program. POSTER N U M B E R S 7 0 (1. Tabas), 139 (M.€cons), 147 (P. Kelly), 362, (P. Clezardin), 377 (6. Stein), 474 (5. Chan), 632 ( K . Ibaraki)

POSTER SESSION I

12:15 P.M.2:30 P.M.

16-89 Bone Cell Biology 90-1 07 Matrix Proteins 108-1 39 Metabolic Bone Disease 140-1 87 Osteoporosis 188-227 Calciotropic Peptides 228-257 Vitamin D 16.

17.

SELECTIVE RETENTION OF MOLECULES WITHIN THE CHONDROCYTE ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM: AN ULTRASTRUCTURAL MARKER FOR DEFECTIVE PROTEIN STRUCTURE. H. Cruber, D. Rimoin, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA REGULATION OF OSTEOBLAST CYTOKINE SECRETION BY TGFP. M. Horowitz,

1. Phillips, M . Centrella, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT,

St.

Francis Hospital, Hartford, CT, and the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT 18.

BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR ENHANCES THE CAPACITY OF RAT STROMAL BONE MARROW CELLS TO FORM MINERALIZED BONE-LIKE TISSUE IN CULTURE. 5. Pitaru, 5. Kotev-Emeth, D. Noff, N. Savion, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel

19.

EFFECTS OF INTERLEUKIN-1ON ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLISM IN H U M A N OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS. W. Zhang, R. Dziak, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY

20.

EFFECTS OF OSTEOCALCIN ON PROLIFERATION A N D DIFFERENTIATION OF PUTATIVE OSTEOCLAST PROGENITORS FROM MURINE LONG-TERM BONE MARROW CULTURES. W . Liggett, 1. Lian, P. Anklesaria, 1. Creenberger, /. Clowacki, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, and University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, M A

21.

ELABORATION OF A FACTOR FROM OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS BY 1,25(OH),D, TO STIMULATE OSTEOCLAST-LIKE CELL FORMATION. R. Okazaki, T. Matsumoto, S. Harada, T . Ishii, T. Kikuchi, T. Saitoh, M. Kumegawa, E. Ogata, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, Teokoku Hormone Co., Kanagawa, and Meikao University School of Dentistry, Saitama, Japan

43-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

22.

23.

MODULATION OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-I RECEPTOR BY ASCORBIC ACID lid OSTEOBLASTIC-LIKE MC3T3-El CELLS. S. Harada, T. Matsumoto, H. Kawaguchi, E. Ogata, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan A NEW, HIGHLY POTENT, ANTI-OSTEOLYTIC BISPHOSPHONATE: CGP 42 446.

1. Green, K. laeggi, K. Mueller, Ciba-Geigy Ltd., Basle, Switzerland 24.

A NOVEL I N VlVO MODEL SYSTEM FOR THE STUDY OF OSTEOCLAST RECRUITMENT A N D DIFFERENTIATION. D. Webber, D . Menton, P. Osdoby, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

25.

EVIDENCE THAT MARROW ADIPOCYTES, FIBROBLASTS, A N D OSTEOGENIC CELLS HAVE A C O M M O N PRECURSOR. 1. Bennett, 1. Triffitt, M. Owen, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, UK

26.

A SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE OF TGF-Pl IS A N ANTAGONIST A N D PARTIAL AGONIST OFTGF-P1 . T. Chen, R. Bates, G. Cianciolo, Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA

27.

EXISTENCE OF 1,25-DIHY DROXYVITAMIN D, RECEPTOR IN OSTEOCLAST PRECURSOR. M. Kumegawa, S. Ishizuka, K. Sumitami, M. Kusuda, T. Kawata, H. Ishida, Y. Hakeda, T . Matsumoto, E. Ogata, Meikai University, Saitama, Teijin Institute, Tokyo, Tokushima University, Saitama, Kyoto University, and University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

28.

A NEW SIMPLE METHOD T O ESTIMATE OSTEOCLAST-MEDIATED BONE RESORPTION USING UNFRACTIONATED BONE MARROW CELLS CULTURED ON DENTIN SLICE. Y. Takada, Y. Nagao, Y. Hakeda, M . Kusuda, K. Hiura, M. Yashiro, H. Kawashima, M. Kumegawa, Snow Brand Milk Products Co., Tokyo, Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co., Tokyo, and Meikai University, Saitama, Japan

29.

DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF ANGIOTENSIN I I ON OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS FROM FETAL RAT CALVARIA. 1. Pfeilschifter, A. Naumann, R. Krempien, H. Minne, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany

30.

EXPRESSION A N D REGULATION OF PDGF RECEPTORS IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. R. Krempien, 1. Pfeilschifter, R. Cronwald, U . Lempert, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany

31.

THE INFLUENCE OF NON-OSTEOGENIC HEMOPOIETIC CELLS ON BONE FORMATION BY BONE MARROW STROMAL POPULATIONS. ). Aubin, S. Fung, W . Georgis, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

32.

INITIATION A N D CONTINUATION OF MINERALIZATION OF BONE NODULES FORMED IN RAT CALVARIA CELL CULTURES. C. Bellows, 1. Aubin, 1. Heersche, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

33.

EXPRESSION OF COLLAGEN TYPE I A N D OSTEOCALCIN mRNA IN OSTEOBLASTS AT DIFFERING STAGES OF MATURITY VISUALIZED BY I N SlTU HYBRIDIZATION. 1. Heersche, S. Reimers, 1. Wrana, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

34.

CELL MEDIATED RESORPTION OF BONE TISSUE FORMED IN VITRO. B. Lowenberg, B. Chernecky, 1. Davies, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

44-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

35.

A CLONAL CHONDROGENIC CELL LINE A N D A RAT CALVARIAL POPULATION WHICH FORMS BONE NODULES INCREASE OSTEOCLAST DIFFERENTIATION IN CO-CULTURES WITH MOUSE BONE MARROW. 1. Taylor, /. Aubin, /. Heersche, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

36.

TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE PRODUCTION OF BONE MATRIX PROTEINS DURING INDUCTION OF MINERALIZATION I N BONE NODULES. K. Lee, /. Aubin, /. Heersche, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

37.

EFFECT OF 24,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, ON THE FORMATION OF OSTEOCLAST-LIKE CELLS FROM HEMOPOIETIC BLAST CELLS. H. Yamato, R. Okazaki, T. Matsumoto, K. Akaogi, N. Taniguchi, M. Kumegawa, E. Ogata, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Kureha Chemical Co., Tokyo, and Meikai University School of Dentistry, Saitarna, Japan

38.

INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-1 MAY SUPPORT FORMATION OF OSTEOCLASTIC MULTINUCLEATED CELLS. E. Kurihara, H . Motchizuki, N . Usui, M . Kusuda, J. Sato, K. Higashino, Y. Hakeda, M. Kumegawa, Meikai University School of Dentistry, Saitarna and Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

39.

EARLY STRAIN-RELATED CHANGES I N THE ACTIVITIES OF ENZYMES I N OSTEOCYTES A N D PERIOSTEAL OSTEOBLASTS FOLLOWING BONE LOADING I N VIVO. R. Rodds, N . Ali, M. Pead, I. Lanyon, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK

40.

TYPE I COLLAGEN mRNA LEVELS PREDICT OSTEOBLAST ACTIVITY I N AGING RATS. R. Turner, T. Spelsberg, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN

41.

ANDROGENS INCREASE BONE CELL PROLIFERATION A N D DIFFERENTIATION BY MECHANISMS INVOLVING INCREASED ELABORATION OF A N D INCREASED SENSITIVITY T O GROWTH FACTORS. C. Kasperk, R. Fitzsimmons, D. Strong, /. Wergedal, D. Baylink, Lorna Linda University, and Pettis VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

42.

POSSIBLE MECHANISM FOR ALENDRONATE INHIBITION OF BONE RESORPTION I N ISOLATED CHICKEN OSTEOCLASTS. M. Sato, W. Crasser, 1. Duong, R. Akins, Merck Sharp and Dohrne Research Labs., West Point, and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

43.

MODULATORY EFFECTS OF 23(S)24(R)-l,2 5(OH)2D3-26,2 3-LACTON E A N D 24,25(OH),D, ON OSTEOCALCIN PRODUCTION IN H U M A N BONE CELLS BY 1,25(OH),D,. T. Yamamoto, K. Yamaoka, Y. Seino, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka, and Okayarna University Medical School, Okayarna, Japan

44.

STIMULATION OF TARTRATE-RESISTANT ACID PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY I N IMPLANTS CONSISTING OF DEMINERALIZED A N D MINERALIZED BONE M A TRICES. A. Severson, T. Huntley, University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Duluth, MN

45.

EFFECT OF CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS A N D NEOMYCIN SULFATE ON THE PARATHYROID HORMONE-INDUCED CYTOSOLIC Ca I O N RESPONSE DIFFERS I N NAIVE A N D PTH DOWN REGULATED ROS 17/2.8 CELLS. 1. Bidwell, W. Carter, M. Fryer, H. Heath 111, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

45-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

46.

THE CYTOSOLIC CALCIUM ION RESPONSE TO PARATHYROID HORMONE IN ROS 17/2.8 CELLS CONSISTS OF BOTH INTRACELLULAR RELEASE A N D EXTRACELLULAR ENTRY OF Ca, NEITHER MEDIATED BY PROTEIN KINASE C. W. Carter, 1. Bidwell, M. Fryer, H. Heath 111, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, M N

47.

IN VITRO BONE RESORPTION IS DECREASED BY AN OSTEOCLAST-DIRECTED MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY. M. Oursler, L. Li, D. Webber, D. Menton, P. Osdoby, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

48.

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF BONE-CELL INTERACTIONS OF AVIAN OSTEOCLASTS AND RELATED GIANT CELLS. M. Oursler, D. Webber, L. Li, D. Menton, P. Osdoby, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

49.

PROSTAGLANDIN E, STIMULATES INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I SYNTHESIS IN OSTEOBLAST-ENRICHED CULTURES FROM FETAL RAT BONE. T . McCarthy, M. Centrella, L. Raisz, E. Canalis, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, and The University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

50.

EXPRESSION OF PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR A N D REGULATION OF PDGF BINDING ARE BOTH ISOFORM SPECIFIC IN OSTEOBLAST-ENRICHED CULTURES FROM FETAL RAT BONE. M. Centrella, T . McCarthy, C. Ladd, E. Canalis, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, and The University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

51.

TEMPORAL STAGES OF OSTEOGENIC DIFFERENTIATION OF MARROW CELLS IN IN VlVO DIFFUSION CHAMBER CULTURES. L. Passi-Even, E. Dankner, 0. Cazit, 1. Bab, Hebrew University-Hadassah Faculty of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel

52.

COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF ACTIONS OF BIPHOSPHONATES ON BONE RESORPTION IN VITRO. T . Abe, A. Flanagan, T. Chambers, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK

53.

TRAP-POSITIVE MULTINUCLEATE CELLS FORMED I N H U M A N BONE MARROW CULTURES DO NOT RESORB BONE. A. Flanagan, T. Chambers, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK

54.

LINEAGE ANALYSIS OF OSTEOCLASTS: INDUCTION OF OSTEOCLASTIC DIFFERENTIATION FROM INDIVIDUAL CFU-C BY INCUBATION IN CONTACT WITH BONE MARROW STROMAL CELL LINES. C. Hattersley, 1. Kerby, T . Chambers, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK

55.

OSTEOCLAST RESORPTION-STIMULATINGACTIVITY IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE OSTEOBLAST CELL SURFACE AND/OR THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. K. Fuller, A. Gallagher, T. Chambers, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK

56.

EFFECT OF MAST CELLS O N OSTEOCLAST A N D OSTEOBLAST ACTIVITY. 1. Graves, K. Dileepan, 0.Stechschulte, jr., R. jilka, Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, and University of MissouriKansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO

57.

CARBONIC ANHYDRASE IN MOUSE ERYTHROCYTES A N D CALVARIAL BONE. 1. Creene, A. Kenny, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, TX

-S6-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

58.

THE EFFECT OF ALENDRONATE ON BONE FORMATION I N HEALING MARROW.

1. Seedor, H. Quartuccio, 1. Bab, C. Rodan, D. Thompson, Merck Sharp and Dohrne Research Labs, West Point, PA, and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

59.

TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR p INCREASESmRNA FOR UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR AS WELL AS PA-INHIBITOR 1 IN OSTEOBLASTS. E. Allan, S. Fukurnoto, T. Martin, University of Melbourne, and St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia

60.

CHARACTERISTICS OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE INDUCTION IN UMR 201 CELLS BY RETlNOlC ACID. 1. Heath, M. Horsfield, T. Martin, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, University of Melbourne, Australia

61.

CHARACTERIZATION OF A NEW HUMAN OSTEOSARCOMA CELL LINE OHS4. 8. Fournier, P. Price, University of California, LaJolla, CA

62.

REGULATION OF HORMONE RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION IN OSTEOBLASTIC SAOS-2 CELLS. M. Kung-Sutherland, L. Rao, 1. Sodek, ), Wylie, H. Ly, M. Haussler, T. Murray, University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Canada, and University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

63.

PROTEIN KINASE C MODULATION OF PTH-SENSITIVE ADENYLATE CYCLASE IS A CANDIDATE MARKER OF OSTEOBLASTIC DIFFERENTIATION. L. Rao, I. Wylie, T. Murray, University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Canada

64.

WITHDRAWN

65.

INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF BIPHOSPHONATES ON RAT OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS: CORRELATION WITH ANTI-RESORPTIVE POTENCY. S. D’SoUza, C. Orcutt, K. Ibbotson, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, NY

66.

DEVELOPMENT AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A TRANSFECTED CLONAL CELL LINE DERIVED FROM NORMAL HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. P. Keeting, R. Scott, T . Spelsberg, R. Kurnar, B . Riggs, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

67.

DEVELOPMENT OF A SERUM-FREE, DEFINED MEDIUM FOR TESTING NORMAL HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. 1. Han, P. Keeting, M. Anderson, 5. Bonde, T. Spelsberg, R. Scott, B. Riggs, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN

68.

THE ULTRASTRUCTURE OF SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT A N D OSTEOCLAST FORMATION IN FETAL MOUSE METATARSAL ORGAN CULTURES. X. Yu, S. Pockwinse, C. MacKay, S. Marks, jr., C. Minkin, University of Southern California School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, M A

69.

THE EFFECT OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, ON CALCITONIN RECEPTOR EXPRESSION DURING OSTEOCLAST FORMATION IN VITRO. C. Minkin, X. Yu, University of Southern California School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

*70.

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN: CHROMOSOMAL LOCALIZATION OF THE GENES FOR HUMAN BMP-1, BMP-2A, AND BMP-3. 1. Tabas, M. Zasloff, 1. Wasmuth, M . Altherr, 6 . Emanuel, 1. Wozney, F. Kaplan, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, Genetics Institute, Inc., Cambridge, MA, and University of California, Irvine, CA

71.

GALLIUM NITRATE INITIATES EXPRESSION OF EARLY A N D LATE GENES RESPONSIBLE FOR BONE FORMATION. P. Guidon, R. Bockman, Cornell University Medical College, The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

72.

GALLIUM NITRATE, A POSSIBLE MECHANISM FOR ITS ANTI-RESORPTIVEACTIVITY. R. Bockman, P. Guidon, Cornell University Medical College, The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

73.

SEQUENTIAL EXPRESSION OF PHENOTYPIC MARKERS FOR OSTEOCLASTS IN LONG TERM HUMAN MARROW CULTURES. N . Kurihara, S . Cluck, C. Roodman, VA Medical Center and University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Washington University and The Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO

74.

RAPID EFFECTS OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS O N EXPRESSION OF PROTOONCOGENES C-MYC AND C-JUN IN NORMAL H U M A N OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. M. Subramaniam, P. Keeting, 6 . Riggs, T . Spelsberg, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN

75.

REGULATION OF OSTEOCALCIN A N D ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE SYNTHESIS BY THE HUMAN OSTEOSARCOMA CELL LINE MG-63. D. Lajeunesse, M. leclerc, M. Brunette, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada

76.

TIME-COURSE OF BONE RESORPTION A N D HORMONE RESPONSES I N THE DISAGGREGATED RAT OSTEOCLAST RESORPTION ASSAY. R. Murrills, L. Stein, W. Horbert, D. Dempster, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY

77.

IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION A N D BONE-RESORBING C HARACTE RISTlCS OF AVIAN MARROW- DE RIVE D MONONUCLEAR A N D MULTINUCLEAR CELLS. N . Athanasou, 1. Alvarez, F. Ross, S. Teitelbaum, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO, and University of Oxford, UK

78.

IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS WITH SV-40 LARGE T ANTIGEN. 1. Apperley, C. Manning, D. Williams, S. Coldring, Massachusetts General, New England Deaconess, and Children’s Hospitals, Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

79.

STROMAL CELLS FROM HUMAN GIANT CELL TUMORS OF BONE; PRODUCTION

OF FACTORS INVOLVED IN RECRUITMENT A N D DIFFERENTIATION OF OSTEOCLASTS. S. Coldring, 5. Kroop, A. Corn, 1. Breznay, 5. Paul, T . Purchio, L. Madisen, Massachusetts General, New England Deaconess, and Children’s Hospitals, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and Oncogen Corp., Seattle, W A 80.

WITH DRAWN

-S8-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

81.

PERTUSSIS TOXIN DOWNREGULATES PTH RECEPTORS IN UMR 106-01 CELLS AND INCREASES PTH RECEPTORS IN ROS 17/2.8 CELLS: HETEROGENEITY OF RECEPTOR REGULATION SUGGESTING DIFFERENCES IN CONTROL OF PTH RECEPTOR-EFFECTOR COUPLING IN CLOSELY RELATED RAT BONE-DERIVED CELLS. A. Abou-Samra, H. jueppner, 0. Schiffer-Alberts, C. Segre, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

82.

INSULIN ANTAGONISM OF PTH ACTION IN OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS OCCURS DISTAL TO CAMP-DEPENDENT GENE REGULATION. F. Bringh~rst, j . Zajac, R. Skurat, A. Kearns, H . Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, M A

83.

THE OPPOSING FUNCTIONS OF DIVALENT CATIONS, MAGNESIUM A N D CALCIUM, I N OSTEOCLAST-MATRIX ADHESION. M. Zaida, 6. Moonga, H . Datta, 1. Maclntyre, M. Makgoba, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, and Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK

84.

PERCHLORATE IS A POWERFUL ANTI-BONE RESORPTIVE AGENT THAT ACTS BY TRANSIENTLY ELEVATING INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM I N ISOLATED OSTEOCLASTS: POSSIBLE THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS. M. Zaida, H . Datta, B. Moonga, 1. Maclntyre, C. Huang, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, and Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London, and The Physiological Laboratory, Cambridge, UK

85.

CONTRASTING EFFECTS OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS ON RAT A N D CHICK OSTEOCLASTS. 0. Dempster, I. Stein, W. Horbert, M. Chowdhury, C. Hamada, R. Murrills, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY, and College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY

86.

CYCLOSPORINE A INHIBITION OF BONE RESORPTION BY DISAGGREGATED OSTEOCLASTS. M. Chowdhury, V. Shen, L. Stein, 0. Dempster, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY, and Columbia University, New York, NY

87.

TGF-Pl and TGF-P2 STIMULATE ECTO-NUCLEOSIDE TRIPHOSPHATE PYROPHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY AND SUPPRESS ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY OF HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. 6. Oyajobi, A. Caswell, R. Russell, Sheffield University Medical School, Sheffield, and University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

88.

AN IN VITRO MODEL FOR MINERALIZATION. M. Thavarajah, 0. Evans, j . Kanis, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

89.

EFFECTS OF ESTROGEN, PROSTAGLANDIN E, A N D PARATHYROID HORMONE ON ISOLATED OSTEOCLASTS. C. Cay, N. Kief, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

90.

ARTICULAR CARTILAGE AND BONE IN THE FEMORAL HEAD IN OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE HIP. N . Fazzalari, B. Vernon-Roberts, 6. Manthy, 1. Parkinson, Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia

91.

BONE LOSS IN THE DISTAL FEMUR OF RABBITS WITH SEPTIC ARTHRITIS. N . Lane, 0. Schurman, R. Smith, Syntex Labs, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA

-s9-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

.

92.

LOCALIZATION OF AM1NOHY DROXY6 UTYL IDENE B ISPHOSPHONATE IN Vl VO AND ITS pH DEPENDENT BINDING TO BONE PARTICLES IN VITRO. M. Sato, W. Crasser, E. Colub, D. Thompson, C. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

93.

IDENTIFICATION OF OSTEONS BY MINERAL CONTENT OR DENSITY USING SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, OR COLOR USING FLUORESCENT MICROSCOPY, FOR MEASUREMENT OF WALL THICKNESS. M. lundy, ). Riddle, W. Pitchford, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

94.

ENHANCED WOUND HEALING USING POSITIVELY CHARGED BEADS. M. Krukowski, D. Weber, T. Mustoe, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

95.

OSTEOGENIC EFFECTS OF PLATELET DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR AND MICROCRYSTALLINE HYDROXYAPATITE. ). McCill, 6. Strates, M. McCuire, Creighton University School of Medicine, and VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE

96.

EFFECT OF ALENDRONATE ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BONE IN RATS AND DOGS. T. Einhorn, C. Peter, ). Clair, C. Rodan, D. Thompson, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

97.

PROTEOGLYCANS SYNTHESIZED BY AN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELL LINE (UMR 106-011. D. Findlay, D. McQuillan, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Fitzroy, and Royal Children’s Hospital, Parkville, Australia

98.

FLUORIDE INTAKE VERSUS BONE STRENGTH IN RAT BONES. M. Akhter, C. Turner, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

99.

WITH DRAWN

100.

ACUTE CHANGES IN SERUM OSTEOCALCIN DURING INDUCED HYPOCALCEMIA IN HUMANS. C. Cundberg, F. Grant, P. Conlin, C. Chen, E . Brown, P. lohnson, M. LeBoff, Yale University, New Haven, CT, and Brigham & Women‘s Hospital, Boston, MA

101.

NET TRABECULUM APPOSITION AND MICROCIRCULATORY PERFUSION IN A HEALING CORTICAL DEFECT. A BONE CHAMBER STUDY IN THE RABBIT. H. Winet, 1. Bao, University of Southern California, and Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA

102.

CYTOKINE GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN CARTILAGE AND SYNOVIUM DERIVED FROM NORMAL AND OSTEOARTHRITIC JOINTS. 1. Seid, 5. Rahman, R. Craveley, S. Fuchs, R. Nordmann, W . Wishart, R. Bunning, R. Russell, Sheffield University Medical School, Sheffield, UK, and Sandoz AG, Basle, Switzerland

103.

SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION EVENTS WHICH MEDIATE THE REGULATION OF COLLAGEN GENE EXPRESSION BY INTERLEUKIN-1 IN HUMAN CHONDROCYTES. K. Fukuo, S. Krane, M. Coldring, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

4 10-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

104.

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BONE IN AGED FEMALE FISHER 344 RATS FOLLOWING FIVE MONTHS OF TRAINING. R. Smith, C. Stebbins, E. Smith, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, University of California, Davis, CA, and University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

105.

THE CYTOSOLIC FREE CALCIUM CONCENTRATION OF AVIAN GROWTH PLATE CHONDROCYTES IS REGULATED TO AN ABSOLUTE SET POINT WHICH INCREASES WITH CELLULAR MATURATION. M. Zuscik, R. Rosier, 1. Puzas, K. Cunter, T. Cunter, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

106.

BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR IS AN AUTOCRINE REGULATOR OF ENDOCHONDRAL OSSIFICATION. R. Rosier, R. Alioto, R. Iandesberg, 1. Puzas, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

107.

COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF THE BETA TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTORS IN GROWTH PLATE CONDROCYTES. R. O’Keefe, 1. Puzas, R. Rosier, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

108.

INCREASED MONOCYTE TNFa AND GM-CSF SECRETION IN PATIENTS WITH RESORPTIVE IDIOPATHIC HYPERCALCIURIA. R. Pacifici, C. Brown, R. McCracken, 1. Obialo, I. Avioli, K. Hruska, Washington University and The Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO, University of Washington, and Zymogenetics Corporation, Seattle, WA

109.

AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE PATHOGENESIS OF HYPOPHOSPHATAEMIA IN CHILDREN ADMITTED WITH KWASHIORKOR. 1. Pettifor, 0. Patel, C. Moodley, Witwatersrand University, Johannesburg, South Africa

110.

”HYPO-ALLERGENIC” RICE, SOY AND PROTEIN HYDROLYSATE FORMULAS: DIFFERENCES IN INFANT BONE MINERAL METABOLISM. P. Venkataraman, H. luhar, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK

111.

PSEUDOHYPERPARATHYROIDISM PROVIDES INSIGHT TO MECHANISMS OF RENAL CELL FUNCTIONS. R. fredericks, Fredericks and Rosenquist, Medical Associates, Reno, NV

112.

IMMOBILIZATION IN YOUNG, SUCKLING RATS DEPRESSES OSTEOBLASTIC ACTIVITY. M. Weinreb, C. Rodan, D. Thompson, Tel Aviv University, Israel, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

113.

EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF BM 21.0955, A NEW BISPHOSPHONATE IN PATIENTS WITH HUMORAL HYPERCALCEMIA OF MALIGNANCY. C. Wuster, 5. Scharla, 1. Schmidt, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, F.R.G., and Beoringer Mannheim GmbH, F.R.G.

114.

ADMINISTRATION OF INTERFERON GAMMA TO OSTEOPETROTIC MICE STIMULATES BONE RESORPTION. I. Key, W. Ries, T. Van Camp, B. Pitzer, A. Shepard, The Brenner Children’s Hospital, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC

115.

MAINTENANCE OF A NEGATIVE CALCIUM BALANCE DURING HEMODIALYSIS BY THE USE OF A CALCIUM FREE DIALYSATE A N D A LOW CALCIUM INFUSION RATE. M . Kaye, B. Barber, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Canada

411

-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

116.

SERUM TARTRATE-RESISTANT ACID PHOSPHATASE IN NORMAL SUBJECTSA N D PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC BONE DISEASE. S. Minisola, L. Scarnecchia, E. Romagnoli, V. Carnevale, M. Pacitti, R. Roso, C. Mazzuoli, Universita di Rorna, Roma, Italy

117.

PROGNATHISM: A N UNUSUAL ACCOMPANIMENT OF SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS. K. Phelps, M. Bansal, 1. Twersky, SUNY Health Science Center, Brooklyn, and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

118.

TUMOR-INDUCED STIMULATION OF OSTEOBLASTS PREVENTS LYTIC BONE LESIONS IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA. R. Bataille, D. Chappard, C. Marcelli, 1. Ross;, P. Dessauw, P. Baldet, 1. Sany, C. Alexandre, Irnrnuno-Rhurnatologie and Anatornopathologie (Montpellier) and Laboratorie de Biologie du Tissu Osseux (St.Etienne), France

119.

CONTRASTING MECHANISMS OF BONE RESORPTION I N PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE MYELOMA A N D PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. C. Marcelli, C. Lopez, R. Bataille, P. Baldet, University I, Montpellier, France

120.

BONE MINERAL CHANGES AT DIFFERENT SKELETAL SITES I N PATIENTS ON MAINTENANCE HEMODIALYSIS. H . Schober, M. Shih, 1. Foldes, D. Rao, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, M I

121.

ATYPICAL OSTEOMALACIA I N DIALYSIS OSTEODYSTROPHY. M. Cohen-Solal, M. Shih, D. Rao, R. Mohini, M. Kleerekoper, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

122.

A NEW METHOD FOR FRACTIONATION OF URINARY HYDROXYPROLINE. P. Wilson, N. King, M. Shih, A. Parfitt, M. Kleerekoper, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

123.

CELL KINETICS IN PARATHYROID ADENOMAS: EVIDENCE FOR DECLINE I N RATES OF CELL BIRTH A N D TUMOR GROWTH, ASSUMING CLONAL ORIGIN. A. Parfitt, D. Willgoss, 1. lacobi, H . Lloyd, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

124.

FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTION OF TETRACYCLINE BASED MEASUREMENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF BONE FORMATION INDICES I N THE ABSENCE OF DOUBLE LABELLED SURFACES. 1. Foldes, M. Shih, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, M I

125.

EFFECTS OF DIMETHYL-PAMIDRONATE ON MINERAL DENSITY A N D MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MALE RAT FEMORA. 1. Ferretti, N . Mondelo, S. Vazquez, R. Capozza, C. Cointry, R. Capiglioni, C. Bogado, E. Montuori, J. Sanchez, 1. Zanchetta, Universidad de Rosario, Laboratorios Gador, and L. I.M., Buenos Aires, Argentina

126.

KINETIC A N D STATUS MORPHOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF BONE REMODELING ACTIVITY I N THE ILIAC CREST CORRELATES WITH THE HISTOLOGICAL LEVEL OF BONE TURNOVER I N THE SPINE A N D WRIST. ATETRACYCLINE BASED QUANTITATIVE HISTOMORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF 21 NORMAL YOUNG ADULTS. M. Fallon, R. Balderson, A. Bartolozzi, L. Osterman, C. Edwards, Jefferson Medical College, and the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

412-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

127.

THE DISCOVERY OF A NOVEL POTENT ANTIRESORPTIVE CYCLIC BISPHOSPHONATE: CIS-OCTAHYDRO-1-PY RINDINE-6,6-BISPHOSPHONlC ACID, NE,58025. F. Ebetino, 1. McOsker, B. Borah, 1. Emge, R. Crawford, K. Buckingham, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Norwich, NY, and Miami Valley Laboratories, Cincinnati, OH

128.

PRECLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF RISEDRONATE, A THIRD GENERATION BISPHOSPHONATE.1. McOsker, W . Sietsema, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Norwich, NY

129.

GALLIUM NITRATE FOR PRESERVATION OF BONE MASS IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA: RESULTS OF A PILOT RANDOMIZED STUDY. R. Warrell, jr., D. Lovett, f . Dilmanian, M. Frisone, R. Bockman, Memorial Sloan KetteringCancer Center, New York, NY, and the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

130.

THE RELEVANCE OF MINERALIZATION LAG TIME IN THE EVALUATION OF HISTOLOGIC CHANGES IN RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY. N. Libbey, 1. Charan, M. London, L. Pono, 1. Abuelo, Roger Williams General Hospital, Rhode Island Hospital, and Brown University, Providence, RI

131.

FRACTURES IN PAGET’S DISEASE: A SURVEY OF 855 PATIENTS. E. Siris, D. McMahon, €. Flaster, 1. Kelsey, Columbia University, New York, NY

132.

GLUCOCORTICOIDS INCREASE THE HYPOCALCEMIA OF PARATHYROIDECTOMIZED RATS BY AN EFFECT ON BONE. P. Hirsch, A. Mahgoub, P. Munson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

133.

RELATIVE POTENCY OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS IN INCREASING HYPOCALCEMIA IN ADRENALECTOMIZED-PARATHYROIDECTOMIZED RATS. A. Mahgoub, P. Hirsch, P. Munson, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

134.

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM INDUCED BY A LOW CALCIUM/VITAMIN D DEFICIENT DIET IN DOGS. M. Cloutier, M. Gascon-Barre, L. Mallette, P. D’Amour, HGpital St-Luc, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada, and VA Medical Center, Houston, TX

135.

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN QUANTITATIVE HISTOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS AND NON-INVASIVE ASSESSMENTS OF BONE DENSITY. F. Cosman, M. Schnitzer, B. Herrington, D. Dempster, R. Lindsay, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY

136.

HERE DITARY HYPERPHOSPHATAS EMIA : H ISTOMORPHOMETRY AN D RESPONSE TO EHDP. F. Singer, €. Siris, €. Shane, R. Lindsay, D. Dempster, M. Parisien, Columbia University, New York, NY, and Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY

137.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BONE MASS AS ASSESSED BY DENSITOMETRYAND BY HISTOMORPHOMETRY IN PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. M . Parisien, D. Dempster, 5. Silverberg, E. Shane, D. Seldin, R. Lindsay, 1. Bilezikian, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY, and Columbia University, New York, NY

138.

INTRINSIC OSSEOUS RESISTANCE TO PREDNISONE: MECHANISM OF VARIABLE BONE LOSS. L. Quarles, Duke University, Durham, NC 413-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

*139.

MULTILOCUS MAPPING OF THE H U M A N X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS GENE LOCUS. M. €cons, D. Barker, M. Speer, M . Pericak-Vance, P. Fain, M. Drezner, Duke University, Durham, NC, and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

140.

A THREE YEAR STUDY OF LUMBAR BONE DENSITY A N D CALCIUM INTAKE I N EARLY POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN WITHOUT ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY. C. Rosen, S. Hunter, K. Musgrave, R. Bing-You, University of Maine and St. Joseph Hospital, Bangor, ME

141.

CYTOKINE PRODUCTION AND CELL-SURFACE MARKER ANALYSIS IN BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS I N OSTEOPOROSIS. F. Hustmyer, I. Benninger, C. Cirasole, Y. Sakagami, X. Yu, E. Walker, M. Peacock, S. Manolagas, Indiana University and VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN

142.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS, CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY A N D FRACTURE OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR. C.Cooper, C. Wickham, Bristol Royal Infirmary and Southampton General Hospital, Bristol, England

143.

AGE-DEPENDENT BONE LOSS AND CARDIAC VALVULAR CALCIFICATION IN JAPANESE AGED FEMALES. T . Sugimoto, N. Yamashita, M. Yamada, Y. Fuji;, T. Tsunenari, M. Tsutsumi, Takatsuki General Hospital, Takatsuki, Japan

144.

THE EFFECT OF DELAYED MENARCHE ON ADULT BONE DENSITY OF FEMALE ATHLETES. B. Drinkwater, C. Chesnut, 111, Pacific Medical Center and University of Washington, Seattle, WA

145.

TNFcYA N D GM-CSF SECRETION FROM H U M A N BLOOD MONOCYTES: EFFECT OF MENOPAUSE AND ESTROGEN REPLACEMENT. R. Pacifici, C. Brown, L. Rifas, L. Avioli, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, and University of Washington, Seattle, WA

146.

IS THE EFFECT OF WEIGHT O N VERTEBRAL BONE MINERAL DENSITY SPURIOUS? P. Kelly, I.Twomey, P. Sambrook, 1. €isman, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst, and Curtin University, Perth, Australia

*147.

BONE TURNOVER INDICES IN FEMALE TWINS: EVIDENCE FOR A GENETIC EFFECT ON BONE FORMATION. P. Kelly, 1. Hopper, C. Macaskill, N. Pocock, P. Sambrook, 1. Eisman, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Darlinghurst, and University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

148.

UNIQUE NATURAL MODEL OF HYPOGOANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY-A NADAL OSTEOPOROSIS. 1. Vered, B. Sela, E. Dolev, Tel Aviv University, Israel

149.

A COMPARISON OF VERTEBRAL DIMENSIONS BETWEEN POPULATIONS. P. Ross, R. Wasnich, 1. Davis, 1. Vogel, Kuakini Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, and University of California, Davis, CA

150.

HIP FRACTURE INCIDENCE IS LOWER IN JAPANESE THAN IN CAUCASIANS. P. Ross, I. Melton, 111,). Davis, R. Wasnich, Kuakini Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, and Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

414-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

151.

COMPUTING CALCIUM INTAKES TO ACHIEVE DESIRED ABSORPTIVE GOALS. R. Heaney, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

152.

NASAL ADMINISTRATION OF SALMON CALCITONIN DID PREVENT AN AGGRAVATION OF GLUCOCORTICOID INDUCED OSTEOPOROSIS IN CHILDHOOD NEPHROTIC PATIENTS. T. Nishioka, H. Kurayama, 1. Udagawa, C. Matsumura, T. Yasuda, H. Niimi, Chiba Higashi National Hospital and Chiba University, Chiba, Japan

153.

NATURAL HISTORY OF HIGH REMODELING VERTEBRAL OSTEOPOROSIS: A TWO YEAR HISTOMORPHOMETRIC AND RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY. C. Edouard, D. Serrurier, R. Peyron, P. Meunier, INSERM U234, Lyon and Ciba-Geigy Laboratories, Rueil-Malmaison, France

154.

RECENT SECULAR CHANGES IN HIP FRACTURE IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. T. Spector, C. Cooper, F. Lewis, St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, The Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, and The Department of Health, London, UK

155.

THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT DOSAGES OF PAMIDRONATE ON URINARY CALCIUM EXCRETION AND BONE TURNOVER. P. lensen, H. Sorensen, L. Hyldstrup, T. Storm, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, and Sundby Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

156.

REDUCTION IN FRACTURE RATE AFTER INTERMITTENT ETIDRONATE: HISTOMORPHOMETRIC EVIDENCE OF MECHANISM. T . Storm, C. Thamsborg, T . Steiniche, F. Melsen, 0. Sorensen, Sundby Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

157.

THlAZlDES REDUCE BONE LOSS RATE AMONG MEN. A LONGITUDINALSTUDY. R. Wasnich, ). Davis, P. Ross, 1. Vogel, Kuakini Medical Center, Honolulu, HI, and University of California, Davis, CA

158.

COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT METHODS FOR VERTEBRAL FRACTURE IDENTIFICATION AND FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE SPINE DEFORMITY INDEX. C. Leidig, H. Minne, P. Sauer, C. Duckeck, 1. Siromachkostov, W. Schwarz, T. Schilling, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany

159.

BONE MINERAL DENSITY OF THE LUMBAR SPINE IN ENDOMETRIOSIS. N. Lane,

C. Harter, R. Chin, Syntex Laboratories and Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 160.

WITHDRAWN

161.

17P-OESTRADIOL AND CONTINUOUS NORETHISTERONE: A UNIQUE TREATMENT FOR ESTABLISHED OSTEOPOROSIS IN ELDERLY WOMEN. C. Christiansen, 6 . Riis, Glostrop Hospital, Glostrop, Denmark

162.

INFLUENCE OF VARIOUS DIETARY COMPONENTS OF INTESTINAL CALCIUM ABSORPTION IN THE RAT. R. Brommage, M. luillerat, Nestle Research Centre, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, Switzerland

163.

CONTRIBUTIONS OF MINERAL CONTENT AND BONE WIDTH TO ULNAR STIFFNESS IN WOMEN. F. McCabe, 1.Zhou, C. Steele, R. Marcus, Stanford University, and VA Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

164.

165.

PREDICTED VERSUS OBSERVED CHANGES IN BONE MINERAL DENSITY FOLLOWING 8 MONTHS OF RUNNING OR WEIGHTLIFTING. M. Bouxsein, C. Snow-Harter, B. Lewis, D. Carter, R. Marcus, Stanford University and VA Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA AGE A N D BONE MASS IN BRAZILIAN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN. V. Szejnfeld, ). Aldrighi, M. Ferraz, E. Atra, S. Piato, Escola Paulista de Medicina and F.C.M. Santa

Casa de SP, S5o Paulo, Brazil 166.

TREATMENT OF PRIMARY OSTEOPOROSIS FOR 1 YEAR WITH PARATHYROID PEPTIDE hPTH (1 -34) BY DAILY INJECTIONS INCREASES ILIAC TRABECULAR NUMBER AS WELL AS WALL WIDTH OF COMPLETED PACKETS OF NEW BONE. 1. Bradbeer, M. Arlot, P. Meunier, 1. Reeve, MRC Clinical Research Centre and Northwick Park Hospital, Harrow, UK, and INSERM U234, Lyon, France

167.

INCREASING DAIRY PRODUCT CONSUMPTION HAS NO EFFECT ON CALCIUM AND BONE METABOLISM I N YOUNG WOMEN CONSUMING 500 M G CALCIUM AND 350 M G CAFFEINE. 1. Massey, M. Schwantes, Washington State University, Pul Iman, WA

168.

THE USE OF ION SPECIFIC MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE TREATMENT OF OSTEOPOROSIS. F. Magee, R. Fitzsimmons, D. Baylink, A. Weinstein, IatroMed Inc., Phoenix, AZ, and Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA

169.

TYPE 1 AND TYPE 3 COLLAGEN PRODUCTION IN OSTEOPOROTIC WOMEN DURING ESTROGEN/PROGESTOGEN SUBSTITUTION A N D ANABOLIC STEROID THERAPY. C. Hassager, 1. lensen, 1. )ohansen, C. Christiansen, Glostrop Hospital, Glostrop, Denmark

170.

FAIR SKIN AND SMALL BODY SIZE ARE NOT RISK FACTORS FOR OSTEOPOROSIS: COMPARISON WITH BLACK AND WHITE NORMALS. D. Nelson, M. Kleerekoper, E. Peterson, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

171.

RADIAL BONE MASS IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: A 5-YEAR STUDY.

1. Ballard, D. Holiday, H. Graham, 6. McKeown, University of Texas, Tyler, TX 172.

INHIBITION OF BONE LOSS DUE TO ESTROGEN DEFICIENCY IN BABOONS. D. Thompson, ). Seedor, H. Solomon, H . Klein, R. lackson, H. Quartuccio, ). Davidson, 1. Clair, H . Simmons, G. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

173.

CORTICAL BONE RESPONSE AFTER IN VlVO FORCE APPLICATION. D. Raab, D. Kimmel, C. Turner, M. Akhter, R. Recker, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

174.

EARLY BONE MINERAL MEASUREMENT. A PREDICTOR OF LATER APPENDICULAR FRACTURE. M. Stegman, R. Heaney, R. Recker, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

175.

DIFFERENCES IN RESPONSE TO CALCIUM INFUSION IN CA-RESTRICTED AND CA-SUPPLEMENTED SUBJECTS. M. Barger-Lux, R. Heaney, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

176.

REVISED CRITERIA FOR VERTEBRAL DEFORMITY. K. Davies, R. Recker, R. Heaney, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

177.

ETHNIC BACKGROUND AS A PREDICTOR OF OSTEOPOROTIC FRACTURE SYNDROME. 1. Lappe, M.Stegman, R. Heaney, R. Recker, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

178.

LONG-TERM EFFECT OF NAPROXEN ON CANCELLOUS BONE OF AGED OVARIECTOMIZED RATS. T. Coble, N. Lane, D. Kimmel, Syntex Laboratories, Palo Alto, CA, and Creighton University, Omaha, NE

179.

EFFECT OF CHRONIC RESTRICTION OF FOOD INTAKE ON BONE MASS AND DYNAMICS IN AGED RATS. M.Care, T. Pacheco, T. Coble, D. Kimrnel, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

180.

ILIAC BONE HISTOMORPHOMETRY IN NORMAL PERI- A N D POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN. R. Recker, D. Kimmel, 1. Lappe, T . Coble, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

181.

LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF BONE DENSITY IN PERI-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN, D. Kimmel, 1. Lappe, R. Recker, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

182.

RISEDRONATE: PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A PHARMACOLOGIC STUDY IN PAGETIC PATIENTS. A. Valentin-Opran, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals Inc., Norwich, NY

183.

A WHOLE BODY PHANTOM FOR DEXA PERFORMANCE EVALUATION. R. N o d , R. Payne, Norland Corporation, Ft. Atkinson, W I

184.

A NOVEL SILICON-CONTAINING OSTEOTROPIC AGENT, ZEOLITE A, INDUCES PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF NORMAL H U M A N OSTEOBLASTLIKE CELLS. P. Keeting, T . Spelsberg, B. Riggs, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN, and Ethyl Corporation, Baton Rouge, LA

185.

SKELETAL SIZE DOES NOT PREDICT BONE DENSITY. R. Bauer, sity of Texas, San Antonio, TX

186.

RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN CROSS-SECTIONALLY MEASURED BONE LOSS IN HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN. M. Luckey, D. Meier, 5. Wallenstein, R. Lapinski, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY

187.

LATERAL SPINE SCANS USING DEXA. 1. Hanson, R. Mazess, C. Ciifford,1. Bisek, Lunar Radiation Corporation, Madison, W I

188.

A PROTEIN KINASE C ACTIVATOR MODIFIES PARATHYROID HORMONE-DEPENDENT cAMP PRODUCTION AND PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT IN AN OK CELL CLONE. 1. Cole, 1. forte, The University of Missouri and The Truman Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO

189.

THE CALClTONlN GENE RELATED PEPTIDE STIMULATES cAMP A N D IL-6 IN BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS. Y. Sakagami, C. Cirasole, S. Boswell, S. Manolagas, Indiana University and VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN

417-

S.Haffner,

Univer-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

190.

A NEW HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE AGONIST: EXPRESSION IN YEAST AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY. N. Morrison, 1. Cordeladze, K. Cautvik, 0. Cabrielsen, V . Cautvik, S. Reppe, 0. Olstad, 0. Blingsmo, T. Oyen, E. Voelkel, A. Tashjian, jr., Inst. Surg. Research, Inst. Medical Biochem., University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, and Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

191.

WITHDRAWN

192.

INFLUENCE OF EEL CALCITONIN TREATMENT O N SERUM p2MICROGLOBULIN CONCENTRATION IN OOPHORECTOMIZED WOMEN. C. Fiore, E. Falcidia, R. Foti, S. Caschetto, University of Catania, Italy

193.

UNEXPECTED INHIBITION BY HUMAN INTERLEUKIN-la OF PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PEPTIDE EFFECTS ON CALCIUM A N D BONE METABOLISM IN THE RAT. 0. Torring, R. Turner, W . Carter, A. Firek, K. Laakso, C. Evans, H. Heath 111, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, M N

194.

DISSOCIATION OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-INDUCED PHOSPHATURIA AND la-HYDROXYLASE TROPHISM USING A NOVEL PARATHYROID HORMONE ANALOGUE. T. Carpenter, D. Mcfhee, R. Bort, D. Carnes, Yale University, New Haven, CT, and University of Texas, San Antonio, TX

195.

ROLES OF PARATHYROID CELL NUMBER AND PTHmRNA PER CELL I N SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. T. Naveh-Many, 1. Silver, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel

196.

PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN THE RAT FETUS. D. Heath, P. Senior, F. Beck, University of Birmingham! Birmingham! UK, and Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Physiology and Medicine, Melbourne, Australia

197.

DISSOCIATION OF CAMPFORMATION AND PHOSPHATE UPTAKE IN OPOSSUM KIDNEY CELLS WITH PARATHYROID HORMONE AND PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PROTEIN AGONISTS AND ANTAGONISTS. R. Muff, M. Caulfield, 1. Fischer, University of Zurich, Switzerland, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

198.

DETERMINATION OF TISSUE SENSITIVITY TO PARATHYROID HORMONE IN SKIN-DERIVED FIBROBLASTS FROM PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL BENIGN HYPERCALCEMIA. A. Firek, K. Laakso, M . Fryer, H. Heath 111, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

199.

SIMULTANEOUS TREATMENT WITH PARATHYROID HORMONE AND ESTRADlOL COULD GENERATE NEW TRABECULAE IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED OSTEOPOROTIC BONE. 1. Hashimoto, K. Takaoka, H. Yoshikawa, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka, japan

200.

IS GROWTH HORMONE RELEASING FACTOR A MEDIATOR OF TRAUMATIC HYPERCALCITONINEMIA?. H. Sjoberg, E. Bucht, 8. Cranberg, U. Sjostedt, M. Thoren, Karolinska Institute & Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

201.

PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PEPTIDE A N D VITAMIN D METABOLITES IN THE OVARECTOMIZED RAT. U . Lempert, H . Minne, S. Scharla, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

202.

CALCITONIN VERSUS CHROMOGRANIN A AS PLASMA TUMOR MARKERS IN MEDULLARY THYROID CARCINOMA. E. Blind, H. Schmidt-Cayk, f . Raue, R. Ziegler, D. Connor, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany, and San Diego VA Medical Center, San Diego, CA

203.

A NEW IN VITRO BIOASSAY FOR HUMAN CALCITONIN: VALIDATION AND COMPARISON TO THE RAT HYPOCALCEMIA BIOASSAY. A. Crauer, H . Reinel, f . Raue, H. Schneider, 1. Schroth, A. Kabay, P. Brugger, R. Ziegler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany, and CIBA-Geigy Ltd., Bade, Switzerland

204.

SYNTHETIC SALMON CALCITONIN BY NASAL SPRAY I N PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE. R. Altman, Miami VA Medical Center and University of Miami, Miami, FL

205.

IN VITRO PTHmRNA AND VDRmRNA ARE REGULATED BY 1,25(OH),D, BUT NOT BY RELEVANT CALCIUM CONCENTRATIONS. R. Marks, 7. Naveh-Many, /. Silver, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel

206.

EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL EXERCISE O N PTH AND CALCIUM ABSORPTION IN FEMALE RUNNERS. 5. Crimston, 5. Mottimer, D. Hanley, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada

207.

DENOSINE DERIVATIVES ENHANCE PTH STIMULATED CAMP ACCUMULATION IN ROS 17/2.8 CELLS. C. Du, P. Li, M. Lu, W . Cu, Beijing Medical University, Beijing, China

208.

THE EFFECT OF AGE O N BONE AND RENAL RESPONSIVENESSTO PARATHYROID HORMONE INFUSION IN MAN. D. Agnusdei, R. Civitelli, 5. Conneli, E. Maioli, A. Camporeale, C. Cennari, University of Siena, Siena, Italy

209.

HISTAMINE, A NEW MODULATOR OF RENAL PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT. M. Nakai, M. Fukase, 7. Tsukamoto, 7. Fujita, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

21 0.

N-TERMINAL RADIOIMMUNOASSAY FOR PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PROTEIN. V. Grill, P. Ho, T. Martin, 1. Moseley, C. Donohoo, 1. Ferber, N. johanson, 5. Lee, 1. Orf, 1. Body, 5. Kukreja, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia, INCSTAR Corp., Stillwater, MN, lnstitut Jules Bordet, Bruxelles, Belgium, VA Medical Center, Chicago, IL

211.

MECHANISMS FOR THE STIMULATORY EFFECTS OF PTH AND INSULIN ON (Ca2++Mg’+)-ATPASE IN KIDNEY BASOLATERAL MEMBRANES ARE DIFFERENT. /. Levy, D. Rempinski, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

212.

PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN I N MILK AND ITS CORRELATION WITH CALCIUM IN BOVINE MILK. F. Law, P. Moate, D. Leaver, V. Grill, P. Ho, T . Martin, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, and Ellinbank Dairy Research Institute, Warragul, Australia

213.

CYCLIC AMP RESPONSE TO CALCITONIN GENE RELATED PEPTIDE ANALOGS IN OSTEOBLASTS AND IN AN OSTEOBLAST PRECURSOR MOUSE CELL LINE. D. Thiebaud, 7. Akatsu, T. Yamashita, T . Suda, 7. Noda, R. Martin, A. Fletcher, 7. Martin, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia, Kirin Brewery Co., Maebashi, and Toyo Jozo Co., Ltd., Ohito, Japan

4 1 9-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

214.

TRANSCRIPTIONAL DOWN-REGULATION OF THE H U M A N PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN GENE BY DEXAMETHASONE. M. Cillespie, 1. Clatz, L. Suva, T . Kiriyarna, 1. Moseley, T. Martin, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, Australia, and Merck Sharp & Dohrne Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

215.

SELECTIVE ENHANCEMENT OF CALCITONIN RECEPTOR-BEARING T47D CELLS BY LONG-TERM TREATMENT WITH HYDROCORTISONE. M. Kurokawa, D. Findlay, St. Vincent’s Institute of Medical Research, Fitzroy, Australia

216.

ENDOGENOUS PARATHYROID HORMONE RESPONSE TO ORAL PHOSPHATE ADMINISTRATION IN THE DOG. A. Franks, C. Paddock, L. Tidd, Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Norwich, NY

21 7.

EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR: HIGH AFFINITY RECEPTORS IN OPOSSUM KIDNEY CELLS ALTER PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT. C. Betts, D. Moskowitz, K. Martin, St. Louis University and Washington University, St. Louis, MO

21 8.

ION CHANNELS AND PARATHYROID HORMONE RELEASE: MECHANISM OF ACTION. S. Pocotte, L. Fitzpatrick, NINDS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, M N

21 9.

FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF A SYNTHETIC CHICKEN PARATHYROID HORMONE RELATED PROTEIN 1-36 FRAGMENT. D. Schermer, M. Bradley, R. Nissenson, C. Strewler, VA Medical Center and University of California, San Francisco, CA

220.

REGULATION OF PARATHYROID HORMONE SECRETION BY PLASMA CALCIUM IN THE AGED RAT. 1. Fox, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA

221.

CALCIOTROPIC HORMONE ACTION IN MATURE RAT BONE: EFFECTS O N RELEASE OF OSTEOCALCIN FROM PERFUSED RAT HINDQUARTERS. M. Calvo, M. Clough, C. Cundberg, Food and Drug Administration, Washingrm, DC, and Yale University, New Haven, CT

222.

THYROXINE STIMULATED BONE RESORPTION IS INHIBITED BY CYCLOSPORINE A BUT NOT BY TGF-BETA, ESTRADIOL OR STANOZOLOL. P. Lakatos, P. Stern, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

223.

DIURNAL RHYTHM IN ENDOGENOUS BONE RESORBING ACTIVITY IN RAT SERUM. H. Shinoda, P. Stern, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

224.

ROLE OF CALCIUM SECOND MESSENGER SYSTEMS IN THE TNF-a-STIMULATED BONE RESORPTION. C. Shankar, P. Stern, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

225.

TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR (3 CAUSES A N INCREASE I N THE NUMBER OF PARATHYROID HORMONE BINDING SITES IN RAT OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. P. Seitz, M. Mcfherson, C. Cooper, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX

226.

DIFFERENTIAL INTRAVESICULAR SECRETORY REGULATION FOR CALCITONIN AND CHROMOGRANIN A. E . Martin, I. Deftos, University of California, San Diego, and San Diego VA Medical Center, La Jolla, CA

420-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

227.

COMPARTMENTALIZED GENERANION A N D THE EFFECTIVE CONCENTRATION OF Ino(1,4,5)P3 AT THE SITE OF Ca2+ RELEASE DURING AGONIST STIMULATION I N PERMEABILIZED UMR-106-01 CELLS. 5. Muallem, H . Zhao, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

228.

REGULATION OF IL-6AND IL-1 BY lf25(OH)2D3 I N PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS: POTENT MODULATION OF THE HORMONAL EFFECTS BY PHORBOL ESTERS. F. Hustmyer, C. Cirasole, 5. Manolagas, VA Medical Center and Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN

229.

SERUM LEVELS OF THE CALCIOTROPIC HORMONES I N A N ELDERLY AMBULATORY PUERTO RlCAN POPULATION. 0. Perez Rosello, L. Haddock, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, PR

230.

EFFECTS OF 1,25(OH), VITAMIN D,[lf25-(OH)2D,] ON EXPRESSION OF THE GENES FOR THE CALCIUM BINDING PROTEINS MRP-8 A N D MRP-14 THAT ARE UNIQUE FOR MYELOID LINEAGE CELLS. A. Sellmayer, 5. Krane, A. Ouellette, 1. Bonventre, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Shriners Burn Institute, Boston, M A

231.

ESTROGEN ENHANCES METABOLIC CLEARANCE OF 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D I N RATS. E. Mawer, M . Clements, C. Hickey, University of Manchester Medical School, Manchester, UK

232.

CHLOROQUINE LOWERS SERUM lf25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D I N PATIENTS WITH INFLAMMATORY ARTHRITIS. E. Mawer, P. Still, 1. Palit, P. Holt, Manchester University, Manchester, UK

233.

INTERRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RESPONSIVENESS OF LYMPHOCYTES TO lf25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D 3 A N D T O AGENTS THAT INCREASE INTRACELLULAR CAMP. A. Ravid, R. Koren, C. Rotem, 0. Garach, A. Novogrodsky, U . Liberman, Beilinson Medical Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel

234.

EFFECTS OF la,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 A N D A N ANALOG ON THE ACTIVITY OF MOUSE EPIDERMAL ORNlTHlNE DECARBOXYLASE INDUCED BY 120-TETRADECANOYLPHORBOL-13-ACETATE A N D OKADAIC ACID. H. Yoshida, 5. Otani, 1. Matsui-Yuasa, 5. Morisawa, T. Kono, N. Mizuno, 7 .Hamada, Y. Nishizawa, H . Morii, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka, Japan

235.

1,25-DlHYDROXYCHOLECALClFEROL INDUCES DIFFERENTIATION OF COLONIC EPITHELIAL CELLS. L. Mayerhofer, H. Cross, M. Peterlik, University of Vienna Medical School, Vienna, Austria

236.

EFFECTS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE A N D 1,25(OH),D3 A N D THEIR INTERACTION ON CULTURED CHONDROCYTES OF GROWTH PLATE CARTILAGE. C. Klaus, 6. Eichel, U . Hugel, H. Eing, E. Ritz, 0. Mehls, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, West Germany

237.

POLYAMINES ARE NECESSARY FOR INTERLEUKIN-1 p PRODUCTION BY VITAMIN D, A N D PHORBOL ESTER-STIMULATED U937 CELLS. H . Tahara, 5. Otani, 1. Matsui-Yuasa, H. Koyama, Y . Nishizawa, 5. Morisawa, H . Morii, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka, Japan

421-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

238.

TGFPl STIMULATES THE ELABORATION OF A SOLUBLE FACTOR THAT INTERACTS WITH 1 ,25(OH),D3 TO INCREASE ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN H U M A N BONE CELLS. 1. Wergedal, T. Matsuyama, X. Song, S. Mohan, VA Medical Center and Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA

239.

VITAMIN D STATUS OF ELDERLY INSTITUTIONALIZED CANADIANS: EFFECT OF SEASON AND ORAL VITAMIN D2 ON CIRCULATING 1,25(OH)2D. I.Fraher, A. Caveney, A. Hodsman, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

240.

SYNTHESIS AND FUNCTION OF 8 ALPHA 25-DIHYDROXY-3-OXONEOCHOLECALCJFEROL IN LIVER MICROSOMES. M. Thierry-Palmer, K. Richardson, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

241.

1 ,25(OH),D, AND VITAMIN D RECEPTOR ENHANCE TRANSCRIPTION OF THE TRANSFECTED AVIAN INTESTINAL CALBINDIN-D,,, PROMOTER REGION. 6. Komm, P. MacDonald, C. Whitfield, C. Haussler, M. Haussler, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

242.

STRENGTH IN THE ELDERLY: EFFECT OF 1,25 DIHYDROXYVITAMIN DADMINISTRATION. 6. Halloran, D. Crady, S. Cummings, S. Leveille, R. Daly, 0. Kern, University of California, San Francisco, CA

243.

FURTHER STUDIES TO CHARACTERIZE 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, SYNTHESIS BY CHICKEN BONE MARROW-DERIVED MACROPHAGES. A. Plaschke, E. Ritz, H. Reichel, University of Heidelberg, West Germany

244.

PHOSPHATE AND MAGNESIUM WASTING IN CISPLATIN-TREATED PATIENTS: RESPONSE TO CALCITRIOL. V. Walker, K. Swenerton, C. Coppin, R. Sutton, Vancouver General Hospital, and Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada

245.

DROXYLASEACTIVETHANOL INHIBITS RENAL 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D-1CX-HY ITY IN RATS. T. Peng, 6. Lobaugh, C. Lester, P. Hirsch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

246.

INCREASED RENAL 25(OH)D,-1 -HYDROXYLASEACTIVITY IN NORMOCALCEMIC AND NORMOPHOSPHATEMIC VITAMIN D-DEFICIENT RATS WITH NORMAL PTH. U . Kollenkirchen, M. Walters, 1. Fox, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA

247.

IN MICRONODULAR CIRRHOSIS, THE C-25 HYDROXYLATION OF VITAMIN D, REMAINS UNAFFECTED AS EVIDENCED BY STUDIES I N ISOLATED HEPATOCYTES. C. Dube, C. Ether, S. Vallieres, M. Cascon-Barre, HBpital Saint-Luc, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada

248.

PARATHYROIDECTOMY ABOLISHES THE INCREASE IN RENAL 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D-1-HYDROXYLASE IN LACTATING RATS. 6. Lobaugh, A. Boass, S. Garner, S. Toverud, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

249.

REGULATION OF SERUM 1,25-(OH),D, IN LACTATING RATS: ROLE OF LACTATIONAL INTENSITY. 6. Lobaugh, A. Boass, S. Garner, S. Toverud, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 422-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

250.

CYCLOSPORINE A STIMULATION OF RENAL 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D-1-HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY. C. Bales, K. Currie, M . Drezner, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

251.

BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF 24-HOMOANALOGS OF 1 ,25-(OH),D, ON THE INDUCTION OF 24-HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY IN HL-60 CELLS. M . Inaba, H. Deluca, University of Wisconsin, Madison, W I

252.

REGULATION OF PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 ACTIVITY BY 1,25-(OH),D, IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS: POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF ACTION. I. Swain, Z. Schwartz, I. Bonewald, 5. Boyan, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

253.

VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY CAUSES A SELECTIVE REDUCTION IN THE DEPOSITION OF TGFP IN RAT BONE: POSSIBLE MECHANISM FOR IMPAIRED OSTEOINDUCTION. R. Finkelman, T. Iinkhart, S. Mohan, D. Baylink, N. Bell, VA Medical Center and Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, and VA Medical Center and University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

254.

CALCIUM UPTAKE BY DUODENAL EPITHELIAL CELLS IS INCREASED DURING LACTATION. M. Thomas, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX

255.

SERUM CALCIUM, PHOSPHORUS A N D VITAMIN D METABOLITES IN RATS FED INCREASED DIETARY CALCIUM A N D VITAMIN D . 1. Rader, S. Hight, S. Capar, Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC

256.

1a-25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D RAPIDLY INCREASES CYTOSOLIC A N D NUCLEAR CALCIUM LEVELS IN CLONAL RAT OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS WITH A N D WITHO U T THE VITAMIN D RECEPTOR: INHIBITION BY 1 P,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D,. 1. Rockwell, A. Sorensen, D. Baran, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, M A

257.

1a-25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, RAPIDLY INCREASES D N A SYNTHESIS IN ISOLATED RAT LIVER NUCLEI: INVOLVEMENT A N D D N A POLYMERASE-a A N D TOPOISOMERASE I. A. Sorensen, D. Baran, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, M A

2 ~ 3 0P.M.3:30 P.M.

STATE-OF-THE-ART I: MECHANISMS OF SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION CHAIRPERSON-Gerald

D . Aurbach

ROLE OF G-PROTEINS-lutz Birnbaumer ROLE OF TYROSINE KINASES-Tony Hunter 3 ~ 4 5P.M.5:15 P.M.

OSTEOBLASTS: REGULATION OF FUNCTION CHAIRPERSONS-Arnold J. Kahn Jane 6. Lian

3:45 P.M.

258.

CORTISOL DIFFERENTIALLY MODULATES INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I A N D II BINDING ON OSTEOBLAST-ENRICHED FETAL RAT BONE CELLS. T. McCarthy, E. Canalis, M . Centrella, St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, and University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

-S23-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990

4:OO P.M.

259.

ISOLATION A N D CHARACTERIZATION OF A CLONE ENCODING INHIBITORY INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN FROM A H U M A N BONE CELL cDNA LIBRARY: DETERMINATION OF ITS COMPLETE SEQUENCE. D. Strong, D. LaTour, T . Linkhart, D. Baylink, S. Mohan, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

4:15 P.M.

260.

TYPE 5 TARTRATE RESISTANT ACID PHOSPHATASE IS A DIRECT STIMULATOR OF OSTEOBLAST FUNCTION. M. Ishibe, R. Rosier, 1. Puzas, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

4:30 P.M.

261.

INVOLVEMENT OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN THE REGULATION O F SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION I N BONE CELLS: EVIDENCE FOR A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN H U M A N PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE A N D hPTH. S. Fukayama, A. Tashjian, Ir., Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, M A

4:45 P.M.

262.

DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF ALTERNATIVE PROMOTERS OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN BONE, LIVER A N D KIDNEY. 1. Zernik, K. Twarog, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farrnington, CT

5:OO P.M

263.

PROTEIN KINASE A-DEPENDENT INHIBITION OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE RELEASE BY SaOS-2 CELLS: A CAMP RESISTANT PHENOTYPE. S. Fukayama, A. Kearns, R. Skurat, A. Tashjian, jr., F . Bringhurst, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, M A

5:15 P.M.6:15 P.M.

OSTEOPOROSIS I CHAIRPERSONS-Munro Peacock Shonni Si lverberg

5:15 P.M.

264.

EFFECT OF GROWTH HORMONE SUPPLEMENTATION ON BONE LOSS I N GnRH AGONIST-TREATED FEMALE MONKEYS. D. Mann, T. Orr, C. Rudman, K. Could, Morehouse School of Medicine, Genentech, Inc., Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center, Atlanta, GA, and South San Francisco, CA

5:30 P.M.

265.

FLUORIDE-INDUCED STIMULATION OF BONE FORMATION IN OSTEOPOROSIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED D N A SYNTHESIS BY OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS IN VITRO. P. Marie, M. de Vernejoul, A. Lomri, INSERM U18, Paris, France

5:45 P.M.

266.

SODIUM FLUORIDE-INDUCED BONE EFFECTS I N LAMBS; EVOLUTION AFTER THE END OF NaF EXPOSURE. P. Chavassieux, P. Pastoureau, C. Boivin, M. Chapuy, P. Delmas, C. Milhaud, P. Meunier, INSERM U234, Lyon, and ENVA, Maisons-Alfort, France

6:OO P.M.

267.

HISTOMORPHOMETRIC CHANGES IN ILIAC BONE INDUCED BY SODIUM FLUORIDE THERAPY DEPEND O N CUMULATIVE DOSE. M. Kleerekoper, R. Balena, 1. Foldes, M. Shih, D. Rao, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, M I

-S24-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990 PARATHYROID HORMONE

8:OO A.M.9:45 A.M.

CHAIRPERSONS-Andrew Arnold Michael Rosenblatt 8:OO A.M.

268.

CALCIUM-RESPONSIVE DNA ELEMENT IN THE HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE GENE. T . Okazaki, T. Igarashi, E. Ogata, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

8:15 A.M.

269.

ENDOTHELIN IN PARATHYROID. Y. Fuji;, 1. Moreira, M. Maggi, C. Orlando, C. Aurbach, M. Brand;, K. Sakaguchi, NIDDK AND NINDS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, and University of Florence, Florence, Italy

8:30 A.M.

270.

SINGLE CHANNEL ACTIVITIES IN PARATHYROID CELLS MODULATED BY EXTRACELLULAR CALCIUM. P. Vassilev, M. Kanazirska, C. Chen, R. Butters, D. Tillotson, E. Brown, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

8:45 A.M.

271.

EXPRESSION OF ADENYLATE CYCLASE-COUPLED OSSEOUS PARATHYROID HORMONE RECEPTORS IN XENOPUS OOCYTES. T. Horiuchi, S. Rabbani, C. Hendy, D. Coltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

9:00 A.M

272.

CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GENES CODING FOR AT LEAST TWO SUBTYPESOFTHE PARATHYROID HORMONE RECEPTOR FROM MOUSE OSTEOBLASTS. R. luben, H. Duong, University of California, Riverside, CA

9:15 A.M.

273.

IDENTIFICATION OF MULTIPLE MUTATIONS IN THE GENE ENCODING THE ALPHA SUBUNIT OF G, IN PATIENTS WITH PSEUDOHYPOPARATHYROIDISM TYPE IA. M. levine, 1. Deily, The JohnsHopkins University, Baltimore, MD

9:30 A.M.

274.

MUTATIONS OF THE GENE FOR THE ALPHA SUBUNIT OF G, IN ALBRIGHT’S HEREDITARY OSTEODYSTROPHY: DETECTION BY DENATURING GRADIENT GEL ELECTROPHORESIS. I. Weinstein, P. Cejman, R. Collins, E. Friedman, E. Cershon, A. Spiegel, NIDDK and NIMH, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

9:45 A.M.1O:OO A.M.

Coffee Break

1O:OO A.M.11:15 A.M.

VITAMIN D -

I

CHAIRPERSONS-John S. Adams Mark R. Hughes 1O:OO A.M.

275.

CHARACTERIZATION OF 1,25(OH),D3 RECEPTOR BINDING TO TARGET SEQUENCES IN THE RAT OSTEOCALCIN GENE. M. Demay, H. DeLuca, H. Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, and University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

-S25-

WEDNESDAYr AUGUST 29,1990

10:15 A.M.

276

CHARACTERIZATION OFTHE VITAMIN D RESPONSIVE ELEMENT I N THE H U M A N OSTEOCALCIN GENE PROMOTER. K. Ozono, 1. Liao, R. Scott, S. Kerner, 1. Pike, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

10:30 A.M.

277.

CONTROL OF RAT BGP GENE B Y 1,25-DlHYDROXYVITAMIN D,: COOPERATIVITY OF MULTIPLE ELEMENTS. C. Terpening, C.Haussler, P. lurutka, M. Calligan, 6 . Komm, M. Haussler, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

10:45 A.M.

278.

NON-HYPERCALCEMIC ANALOGS OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D FULLY INDUCE THE H U M A N OSTEOCALCIN GENE PROMOTER I N STABLY TRANSFECTED RAT OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. N . Morrison, 1. Eisman, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia

11 :00 A.M.

279.

PROMOTER THE 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, INDUCED CALBINDIN-D,,K CONTAINS BIOLOGICALLY RESPONSIVE REGIONS WHICH BIND NUCLEAR FACTORS. P. Minghetti, A. Maiyar, K. Lowe, R. Boland, A. Norman, University of California, Riverside, CA

1 2 ~ 0 0NOON12:30 P.M.

Presentations by Representatives of NIA, NIDDK, and NIAMS

11:15 A.M.1:15 P.M.

POSTER SESSION I I 280-350 Bone Cell Biology 351-369 Matrix Proteins 3 7 0 4 0 1 Metabolic Bone Disease 4 0 2 4 4 8 Osteoporosis 4 4 9 4 8 7 Calciotropic Peptides 488-51 6 Vitamin D 280.

1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, INCREASES INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I RECEPTORS I N OSTEOBLASTIC CLONE MC3T3-El CELLS. H. Kurose, K. Yamaoka, H. Tanaka, Y. Seino, Suita Municipal Hospital, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka, and Okayarna University Medical School, Okayarna, Japan

281.

RECEPTOR-MEDIATEDTURNOVER OF COLLAGENASE BY OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS. T. Omura, A. Noguchi, A. Siddiqi, 1. leffrey, N . Partridge, St. Louis University and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

282.

OSTEOCLAST PRECURSORS CIRCULATE IN AVIAN BLOOD. j . Alvarez, N . Athanasou, E. Greenfield, F. Ross, S. Teitelbaum, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO, and University of Oxford, UK

283.

PROSTAGLANDIN E PROMOTES MARROW MACROPHAGE DIFFERENTIATION. S. Perkins, S. Schreiber, 1. Blum, 1. Chappel, W . Stenson, P. Stahl, S. Teitelbaum, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

284.

CHARACTERIZATION OF C1- CONDUCTANCE ASSOCIATED WITH THE OSTEOCLASTIC VACUOLAR-LIKE H+ ATPase. H . Blair, 5. Teitelbaum, P. Schlesinger, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

285.

SYNERGISTIC INTERACTION OF INTERLEUKIN 1 A N D FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR IN H U M A N OSTEOBLAST IL 6 EXPRESSION. 1. Linkhart, S. Linkhart, D. Strong, D. McCharles, A. Beachler, D. Baylink, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

286.

GROWTH FACTORS REGULATE THE SECRETION OF IGF-I IN MOUSE BONE CELLS. F. Tremollieres, D. Baylink, S. Mohan, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

287.

N-TERMINAL SEQUENCES AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATIONS OF TARTRATE-RESISTANTACID PHOSPHATASES FROM OSTEOCLASTOMASA N D HAIRY CELL LEUKEMIA SPLEEN: EVIDENCE FOR A MULTIGENE FAMILY. K . lau, 1. Stepan, S. Mohan, A. Yoo, D. Baylink, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

288.

SYSTEMIC AND LOCAL AGENTS MAY MODULATE IGF-II ACTIONS BY REGULATING THE PRODUCTION OF INHIBITORY IFG BINDING PROTEIN IN HUMAN BONE CELLS. S. Mohan, F. Tremollieres, M. Campbell,). Wergedal, D. Baylink, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

289.

CALCIUM PUMP EXPRESSION DURING RAT INCISOR AMELOGENESIS AND DENTINOGENESIS.1. Borke, A. Zaki, D. Eisenmann, M. Kiely, S. Ashrafi, 1. Penniston, Loyola University School of Dentistry, Maywood, IL, University of Illinois School of Dentistry, Chicago, IL, and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN

290.

REGULATION OF IGF-II AT BOTH THE PROTEIN AND mRNA LEVEL IN HUMAN BONE CELLS IN VITRO BY EXPOSURE TO A N EXTREMELY LOW-AMPLITUDE, LOW-FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELD. R. Fitzsimmons, S . Mohan, D. Strong, W. Adey, 0. Baylink, Lorna Linda University and VA Medical Center, Lorna Linda, CA

291.

ALUMINUM STIMULATES BONE MATRIX SYNTHESIS I N VITRO: EVIDENCE FOR MEDIATION BY INCREASED IGF-II SECRETION. K. lau, A. Yoo, S. Mohan, Loma Linda University and VA Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA

292.

PHOSPHORYLATION LEVELS OF MEMBRANE PROTEINS ARE NORMAL I N ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE-DEFICIENT HYPOPHOSPHATASIA FIBROBLASTS: EVIDENCE AGAINST A ROLE FOR ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE AS A PHOSPHOPROTElN PHOSPHATASE. K. fedde, M. Michell, M. Whyte, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

293.

TGFP REGULATES CALCITONIN RESPONSE ON CULTURED CORD MONOCYTES IN PRESENCE OF 1,25(OH),D. C. Mbalaviele, P. Orcel, A. julienne, M. devernejoul, INSERM U18 and U113, Paris, France

294.

1,25 REGULATES LATE FUSION AND HLADR EXPRESSION IN CULTURED HUM A N CORD BUT NOT ADULT MONOCYTES. M. de Vernejoul, 1. Bielakoff, M. Denne, INSERM U18, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris, France

295.

EFFECTS OF SINGLE DOSE BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR IN RAT FEMORAL DEFECT MODEL. D. Mohler, 1. lane, D. Fehnel, The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

296.

KINETICS OF IN VITRO MINERALIZATION BY AN OSTEOGENIC CLONAL CELL LINE DERIVED FROM MOUSE TERATOCARCINOMA. 1. Chentoufi, D. Lamblin, P. Marie, M. Hott, M. Buc, 0. Kellerman, INSERM Unite 18, Hopital Lariboisiere, and lnstitut Pasteur, Paris, France

-S27-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

297.

HIGH EXTRACELLULAR CALCIUM INHIBITS RAT OSTEOCLASTS BUT DOES NOT POTENTIATE THE CALCITONIN RESPONSE. R. Murrills, I. Stein, W. Horbert, D. Dempster, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, W. Haverstraw, NY

298.

ATF-LIKE PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH THE NUCLEAR MATRIX OF MAMMALIAN OSTEOBLASTS INTERACT WITH THE H 4 HISTONE GENE PROMOTER. S. Dworetzky, K. Wright, 1. Lian, 1. Stein, G. Stein, University of MassachusettsMedical Center, Worcester, M A

299.

THE OSTEOCLAST CALCIUM/DIVALENT CATION RECEPTOR STIMULATES SUBCELLULAR CA2+ GRADIENTS AND PHOSPHOLIPASE C ACTIVATION. A. Miyauchi, E. Greenfield, 1. Alvarez, Z. Bar-Shavit, M . Huskey, S.Teitelbaum, K. Hruska, Jewish Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

300.

ADHESION PROPERTIES OF RELATED CELL LINES DIFFERING IN EXPRESSION OF OSTEOBLASTIC TRAITS. R. Majeska, E. Einhorn, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

301.

AGE-RELATED CHANGES I N THE FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF HYALINE CARTILAGE. H. Adkisson, P. Zarrinkar, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

302.

DEVELOPMENT OF AN I N VITRO MINERALIZATION MODEL WITH EPIPHYSEAL GROWTH PLATE CHONDROCYTES THAT DOES NOT REQUIRE P-GLYCEROPHOSPHATE. Y. Ishikawa, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

303.

MARROW STROMAL CELLS PRODUCE INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTORS. D. Simmons, R. Zhang, S.Mohan, D. Baylink, L. Kidder, C. Klein, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, and Loma Linda University, Lorna Linda, CA

304.

THE EFFECTS OF ALUMINUM O N AN OSTEOPROGENITOR CELL POPULATION. L. Kidder, C . Klein, D. Simmons, N. Rubin, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX

305.

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN ALTERS W-20 STROMAL CELL DIFFERENTIATION IN VITRO. R. Thies, M. Bauduy, D. McQuaid, L. Kurtzberg, P. Cordes, 1. Capparella, 1. Wozney, E. Wang, V. Rosen, Genetics Institute, Cambridge, M A

306.

GROWTH FACTOR CONTENT OF PATHOLOGICAL BONE MAY BE A DETERMINING FACTOR FOR THE CONTROL OF ITS MASS. 1. Puzas, K. Harper, D. Celb, R. Alioto, 1. Sawyer, R. Rosier, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

307.

HUMAN PROSTATIC ACID PHOSPHATASE DIRECTLY STIMULATES ISOLATED BONE CELLS. M. Ishibe, R. Rosier, 1. Puzas, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

308.

DIFFERENTIATION AND PROLIFERATION EFFECTS OF BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR ON RAT AND H U M A N OSTEOSARCOMA CELL LINES. D. Mickey, M. Williams, T. Gray, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

309.

ROLE OF DNA SYNTHESIS IN PROSTAGLANDIN E, MEDIATED BONE RESORPTION. K. Shoukri, F. Woodiel, L. Raisz, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farrnington, CT -S28-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

310.

STIMULATION OF PROSTAGLANDIN E, PRODUCTION IN AN IMMORTALIZED OSTEOBLASTIC CELL LINE BY ARACHIDONIC ACID, TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR PI AND INTERLEUKIN-1. C. Pilbearn, L. Raisz, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farrnington, CT

311.

THE INTERACTION OF HEPARIN AND GROWTH FACTORS O N DNA AND COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS IN BONE. M. Hurley, 5. Kream, I. Raisz, The University of Connecticut Health Center, Farrnington, CT

31 2.

SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA AND INTERLEUKIN 1 ALPHA ON PROSTAGLANDIN EL SYNTHESIS IN BONE CELLS. A. Marusic, 1. Kalinowski, 1. Harrison, M. Centrella, 1. Lorenzo, VA Medical Center, Newington, CT, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT, and University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

313.

REGULATED PRODUCTION OF LEUKEMIA INHIBITORY FACTOR mRNA AND BlOACTlVlTY BY BONE CELLS. A. Marusic, 1. Kalinowski, 1. Lorenzo, VA Medical Center, Newington, CT and University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

314.

CHANGES IN BONE CELLS INDUCED BY AGE. C. Wong, M. Ng, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO

315.

EVIDENCE FOR MULTIPLE MECHANISMS OF HORMONE-STIMULATED INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM MOBILIZATION IN UMR 106-H5 CELLS. M. Babich, H . Choi, C. Alford, M. Bradley, R. lohnson, K. King, R. Nissenson, VA Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, and Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA

316.

FLUORIDE INDUCED 'H THYMIDINE INCORPORATION I N THE HUMAN OSTEOSARCOMA CELL LINE HOS TE85, INTERACTION BETWEEN F A N D GROWTH FACTORS. 6. Reed, 1. Zerwekh, P. Antich, C. Pak, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

31 7.

STRONTIUM ALTERS THE COMPLEXED ACIDIC PHOSPHOLIPID CONTENT OF CHONDROCYTES IN VITRO. E. Neufeld, A. Boskey, The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

318.

EXPRESSION OF A NOVEL OSTEOCLAST ASSOCIATED GENE DOWNREGULATED DURING NORMAL MYELOMONOCYTIC DEVELOPMENT BUT UNALTERED IN AVIAN MYELOMONOCYTIC CELL LINES INDUCED TO DIFFERENTIATE. 1. Kursar, A. Kahn, Pediatric Research Institute, St. Louis, MO

31 9.

TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR ALPHA INHIBITS BONE GLA PROTEIN SYNTHESIS BY PRE- AND POST-TRANSLATIONAL MECHANISMS. M. Nanes, 1. Rubin, I. Titus, C. Hendy, 6. Catherwood, VA Medical Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, and Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

320.

RAT OSTEOBLASTS AND ROS 1712.8 CELLS CONTAIN SIMILAR PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASES. I. Titus, 1. Rubin, M. Nanes, 6. Catherwood, VA Medical Center and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA

-S29-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

321.

OSTEOCLAST ATTACHMENT TO BONE AND ITS SUBSEQUENT RESORPTION DEPEND ON THE VITRONECTIN RECEPTOR. 1. Alvarez, S. Teitelbaum, 1. Chappel, D. Cheresh, D. Sander, M. farach-Carson, P. Cehron-Robey, F. Ross, Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO, Scripps Institute, LaJolla, CA, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, and NIDR, NIH, Bethesda, MD

322.

PROSTAGLANDIN SYNTHESIS IS REQUIRED FOR 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, STIMULATION OF OSTEOCLAST-LIKE CELL GENERATION IN MOUSE MARROW CULTURES. D. Shinar, C. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs, West Point, PA

323.

EFFECTS OF TGFP AND OSTEOINDUCTIVE FACTOR O N OSTEOBLASTIC CELL LINES. M. Kester, C. Mundy, S.Seyedin, D. Rosen, 1. Bonewald, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Collagen Corporation, Palo Alto, CA

324.

EVIDENCE THAT LATENT TGFP PRODUCED BY BONE IS THE TGF PRECURSOR. 1. Bonewald, A. Escobedo, R. Oreffo, D. Twardzik, C. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Oncogen, Seattle, W A

325.

FUNCTIONAL ROLE FOR ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN BONE RESORPTION.

E. Meurer, S. Fukayama, E. Voelkel, A. Tashjian,)r., Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, M A 326.

REGULATION OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE PRODUCTION IN Saos-2/B-lO CELLS: ANTAGONISTIC EFFECTS OF PHORBOL ESTERS AND INTERLEUKIN 1. S. Rodan, C. Wesolowski, C. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs, West Point, PA

327.

CHARACTERIZATION OF TRABECULAR BONE CELLS IMMORTALIZED WITH THE SV-40 LARGE T ANTIGEN: EFFECTS OF RETlNOlC ACID. M. Emst, G. Wesolowski, 1. Suva, C. Rodan, S. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs, West Point, PA

328.

BONE CELLS OF OSTEOBLASTIC CHARACTER INFLUENCE PREOSTEOBLASTIC CELLS TO ACQUIRE OSTEOBLASTIC TRAITS, IN VITRO. H. Cuenther, W. Hofstetter, H. Fleisch, University of Berne, Switzerland

329.

STIMULATION OF RESORPTIVE ACTIVITY OF RAT OSTEOCLASTS IN MEDIA ACIDIFIED BY ALTERATION OF C O OR HC0,-CONCENTRATIONS. M. Taylor, S. )ones, A. Boyde, T. Arnett, University College, London, UK

330.

ANTIBODIES TO THE 80kD IL-1 RECEPTOR PRESENT ON OSTEOBLASTS BLOCK BONE RESORBING ACTIVITY OF TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR AS WELL AS INTERLEUKIN-1. 1. Garrett, R. Chizzonite, 1. Bonewald, C. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Hoffmann-LaRoche Inc., Nutley, NJ

331.

APPEARANCE OF CALCITONIN RECEPTORS ON HL-60 CELLS DURING DIFFERENTIATION ALONG THE OSTEOCLAST LINEAGE. T . Yoneda, M. Alsina, 1. Garcia, C. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

332.

THE EFFECTS OF MINERALIZED SURFACES O N OSTEOCLASTS A N D OSTEOBLASTS. S. Windeler, I. Bonewald, R. Oreffo, D. Carnes, M. Kester, G. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX -S30-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

333.

EVALUATION OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-P SECRETION BY A NUMBER OF OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELL LINES. C. Citlin, E. Hazum, 1. Kim, Glaxo Research Laboratories, Research Triangle Park, N C

334.

A SUBPOPULATION OF OSTEOBLASTS A N D NEWLY EMBEDDED OSTEOCYTES SHARE A C O M M O N ANTIGEN. A. Wetterwald, H . fleisch, University of Berne, Switzerland

335.

EFFECT OF DlSODlUM DIHYDROGEN (CYCLOHEPTYLAMINO) METHYLENE BIPHOSPHONATE MONOHYDRATE ON THE BONE FORMATION A N D RESORPTION I N RATS A N D DOGS. HISTOLOGICAL EXAMINATION. R. Fujimoto, A. Nii, A. Okazaki, H. Miki, H. Kawashima. Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan

336.

EXPRESSION OF THE OSTEOBLAST PHENOTYPE IN TE89 OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. 1. Shapiro, 1. Stock, 1. Coderre, S. Chipman, St. Vincent Hospital, Medical Center of Central Mass-Memorial and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, M A

337.

ENDOTHELIN RECEPTORS TRIGGER DUAL PHASE RISE IN CYTOSOLIC CA2+ I N THE OSTEOBLASTIC UMR-106-01 CELL LINE. D. Yamaguchi, S. Muallem, H . Lee, C. Kleeman, M. Mackovic-Basic, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and VA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, and Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

338.

ISOLATION OF PLASMA MEMBRANES FROM OSTEOBLASTIC UMR-106 LINE: EXPRESSION OF ATP-DEPENDENT Ca2+-TRANSPORT. M. Mackovic-Basic, C. Kleeman, H . lee, D. Yamaguchi, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and VA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, CA

339.

RETlNOlC ACID STIMULATES VITAMIN D RECEPTOR+ mRNA A N D RETlNOlC ACID RECEPTOR-mRNA LEVELS IN THE RATOSTEOSARCOMA UMR-106. Y. Guo, C. Whitfield, 6. Komm, M. Haussler, C. lones, Queen’s University, Ontario, Canada, and The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

340.

YM175 INHIBITS OSTEOCLAST DIFFERENTIATION A N D BONE RESORBING ACTION OF MATURE OSTEOCLASTS. Y. Nagao, Y. Ishitobi, 5. Fukushima, H. Kinoshita, H . Kawashima, M. Kumegawa, Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

341.

NICOTINE INHIBITS COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS A N D ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY BUT STIMULATES D N A SYNTHESIS I N OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. L. lenz, R. Calvin, W . Ramp, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

342.

EFFECTS OF SMOKELESS TOBACCO EXTRACT ON D N A A N D COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS I N FIBROBLASTS A N D OSTEOBLASTS. R. Calvin, L. lenz, W. Ramp, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

343.

LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF CALCITONIN ON RESORPTIVE ACTIVITY OF RAT OSTEOCLASTS. 1. Fitton, T. Arnett, University College, London, UK

344.

MODULATION OF ANDROGEN EFFECTS ON RAT CALVARIAL OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS BY 1,25 DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D,. T . Arnett, K. Colston, A. McKay, C. Gray, University College and St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, UK

-S31-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

345.

CHARACTERISTICS OF TRANSMEMBRANE PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT I N THE OSTEOBLASTIC UMR-106-01 CELL LINE. K. luong, 1. Nguyen, j . Green, C. Kleernan, D. Yarnaguchi, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and VA Medical Center, West Los Angeles, CA

346.

ACUTE PHOSPHATE DEPRIVATION SUPPRESSES THE ACTIVITY OF THE A N I O N EXCHANGER IN OSTEOBLAST LIKE CELLS: A POSSIBLE EXPLANATION FOR THE OSTEOPENIA INDUCED BY PHOSPHATE DEPLETION. 1. Green, L. Ye, C. Kleernan, C. Chairnovitz, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

347.

EFFECT OF MACROPHAGE COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR ON BONE RESORPTION A N D OSTEOCLAST FORMATION IN VITRO. V. Antonioli-Corboz, M. Cecchini, R. Felix, H. Fleisch, C. van der Pluijrn, C. Lowik, University of Berne, Switzerland, and University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

348.

DISSOCIATION OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-STIMULATED Ca2+ A N D CAMP MESSAGE SYSTEM BY ACUTE PHOSPHATE DEPRIVATION IN OSTEOBLASTS. 1. Green, C. Kleeman, C. Chairnovitz, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

349.

DEXAMETHASONE REGULATION OF ALTERNATIVE PROMOTERS OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE IN ROS 17/2.8 OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. 1. Zernik, K. Twarog, B. Krearn, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

350.

CHARACTERIZATION OF ATP-DEPENDENT PROTON TRANSPORT IN BONE MICROSOMAL MEMBRANE VESICLES. K. Sundquist, T. Rautiala, H. Vaananen, University of Oulu, Finland

351.

EFFECT OF CALCIUM ON THE STRUCTURE OF PHOSPHORYLATED A N D DEPHOSPHORYLATED EMBRYONIC BONE PHOSPHOPROTEINS. M. Takahashi, Y. Mikuni-Takagaki, V. Renugopalakrishnan, R. Saavedra, M. Clirncher, The Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

352.

DISTRIBUTION OF ZINC I N THE AVIAN GROWTH PLATE. C . Sauer, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

353.

INTERACTION OF MATRIX VESICLES WITH THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX: EVIDENCE FOR A CLOSE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PROTEOGLYCANS A N D MATRIX VESICLES. 1. Wu, 6. Genge, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

354.

EFFECT OF SODIUM SUBSTITUTION ON ISOLATED MATRIX VESICLE-MEDIATED CALCIFICATION. W. Valhrnu, R. Wuthier, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

355.

CHARACTERIZATION OF A CLONED MURINE BONE MARROW STROMAL CELL LINE WITH OSTEOGENIC POTENTIAL. D. Diduch, L. Ruland, B. Blue, M. Bolander, G. Balian, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, and NIAMS, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

356.

VITAMIN D A N D TGF-P EFFECT ON TYPE X COLLAGEN A N D MINERALIZATION IN CHICK HYPERTROPHIC CHONDROCYTES. D. Diduch, G. Balian, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

357.

SIGNIFICANCE OF OSTEOINDUCTION IN BONE FORMATION A N D REPAIR AND EFFECT OF STERILIZATION. M. Weston, 8. Strates, M. McCuire, VA and Nebraska Medical Centers, and Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE

358.

CAFFEINE HAS DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS O N GENES EXPRESSED DURING SPECIFIC STAGES OF OSTEOBLAST DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO. T. Owen, L. Barone, C. Stein, /. Lian, M . Tassinari, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, M A

359.

IDENTIFICATION OF TWO UNIQUE PHOSPHOPROTEINS I N CHICKEN BONE: SIMILARITIES TO THE MAMMALIAN BONE PROTEINS OSTEOPONTIN A N D BONE SIALOPROTEIN 11. Y. Cotoh, L. Cerstenfeld, M. Climcher, Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital, Boston, M A

360.

cDNA CLONING OF THE MAJOR 66 kDa CHICKEN BONE PHOSPHOPROTEIN: EXPRESSION DURING BONE DEVELOPMENT, OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION, A N D TISSUE DISTRIBUTION. M. Moore, Y. Cotoh, L. Cerstenfeld, Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital, Boston, M A

361.

EFFECT OF DEXAMETHASONE ON CHONDROCYTE MATURATION A N D CALCIFICATION IN CULTURE. V. Ramirez, Z. Schwartz, R. Hancock, 1. Swain, 8. goyan, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

*362.

OSTEONECTIN IS AN (Y-GRANULECOMPONENT INVOLVED WITH THROMBOSPONDIN IN PLATELET AGGREGATION. P. Clezardin, L. Malaval, C. Kaplin, P. Delmas, lnserm Units 331 and 234, Lyon and INTS, Paris, France

363.

OSTEOPENIA AND BONE REMODELING ABNORMALITIES IN WARFARIN TREATED LAMBS: A POSSIBLE ROLE FOR OSTEOCALCIN. P. Pastoureau, P. Vergnaud, P. Meunier, P. Delmas, lnserm U. 234, Hopital E. Herriot, Lyon, France

364.

EFFECTS ON WARFARIN ON OSTEOCALCIN CONTENT A N D LOCALIZATION IN NEONATAL RAT BONE. G. Boivin, C. Morel, 1. Lian, C. Anthoine, P. Dubois, P. Meunier, lnserm U. 234, Lyon, CNRS URA559, Lyon-Sud, Oullins, France, and Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, M A

365.

RAPID EXTRACTION OF NON-COLLAGENOUS PROTEINS FROM H U M A N BONE. B. Demiaux, I . Malaval, C. Chenu, P. Delmas, lnserm U. 234, Eduoard Herriot Hopital, Lyon, France

366.

FLUORIDE EFFECTS ON MINERALIZING CHICK OSTEOBLAST EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. S . Chipman, D. Drinkwater, K. Scriven, A. Arsenault, /. Shapiro, St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, MA, and McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

367.

BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE NORMAL H U M A N OSTEOBLAST BY THE ISOLATION AND AMINO TERMINAL SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF SECRETED PROTEINS. 1. /ohansen, M. Williamson, P. Price, Glostrop Hospital, Glostrop, Denmark, and University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

368.

SUB-CELLULAR IMMUNOLOCALISATION OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, RECEPTORS IN RAT EPIPHYSEAL CARTILAGE CHONDROCYTES. N. Balmain, /. Pike, D. Hotten, P. Cuisinier-Cleizes, H . Mathieu, U120 Inserrn, LeVesinet, France, and Baylor College, Houston, TX

433-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

369.

FIBRONECTIN PRODUCTION I N A MINERALIZING BONE CULTURE: INHIBITION BY CORTICOSTERONE A N D ITS REVERSAL BY INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I. M. DeRome, M. McCarthy, 5. Asbbaugh, C. Cronowicz, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

370.

EFFECT OF YM175 ON EXPERIMENTAL HYPERCALCEMIA A N D TUMORINDUCED OSTEOLYSIS I N RATS. M. Kudo, 1. Abe, K. Kawamuki, €. Yamaoka, Y. Isornura, M. Takeuchi, H. Kawashima, Yarnanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

371.

INTRAVENOUS BUT NOT ORAL 1,25 D THERAPY INCREASES BIOCHEMICAL MARKERS OF BONE FORMATION A N D RESORPTION I N UREMIC PATIENTS. ). Talbot, P. Hammond, 5. Farley, D. Baylink, 1. Nelson, M. Pandian, A. Taylor, R. Cutler, Loma Linda University and Pettis VA Hospital, Loma Linda, and Nichols Institute, San Juan Capistrano, CA

372.

SIGNIFICANT DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES I N FACTORS DETERMINING OSTEOCALCIN, ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE A N D ACID PHOSPHATASE. R. Christenson, A. Taylor, M. Lupien, D. Baylink, Lorna Linda University and Pettis VA Hospital, Lorna Linda, CA

373.

VITAMIN D RECEPTOR NUMBER A N D AFFINITY I N TlBlAL DYSCHONDROPLASIA. j . Soares, jr., J. Shellurn, j . Kerr, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

374.

CARBOXYTERMINAL PROPEPTIDE OF H U M A N PROCOLLAGEN TYPE I AS A SERUM MARKER IN METABOLIC BONE DISEASE. E. Eriksen, j . Melkko, P. Charles, C. Hasling, L. Mosekilde, 1. Risteli, Aarhus Amtssygehus, Aarhus C., Denmark, and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland

375.

TWO-DIMENSIONAL CANCELLOUS BONE STRUCTURE IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. R. Mellish, M. Parisien, 5. Silverberg, E. Shane, R. Lindsay, 1. Bilezikian, D. Dempster, Regional Bone Center, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY, and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY

376.

EXPLORATION OF COMB I NED INTRAVE NOUS SOD1UM ETIDRONATE-PLICAMYCIN TREATMENT OF RESISTANT PAGET'S DISEASE OF BONE. W . Ryan, RushPresbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, IL

*377.

CALCITONIN IMPROVES CYCLOSPORIN A INDUCED HIGH TURNOVER OSTEOPOROSIS I N THE RAT. 6. Stein, M. Takizawa, 5. Epstein, M. Fallon, Albert Einstein Medical Center and Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA

378.

CYCLOSPORIN G COMPARED T O CYCLOSPORIN A IS LESS HARMFUL T O RAT BONE I N VlVO OVER THE SHORT A N D LONG TERM. 6. Stein, M. Takizawa, 5. Epstein, M. fallon, Albert Einstein Medical Center and Thomas Jefferson Medical Co IIege, Phi Iadel p hia, PA

379.

PAMIDRONATE PRESERVES BONE MASS IN A GENE TRANSFER MODEL OF HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. 6 . Mitlak, C. Rodda, M. von Deck, N . Dobrolet, H. Kronenberg, R. Neer, 5. Nussbaum, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

434-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

380.

BLACK BONES FOLLOWING CHRONIC MINOCYCLINE HYDROCHLORIDE TREATMENT. M. Rumbak, 1. Pitcock, C . Palmieri, 1. Robertson, University of Tennessee at Memphis and Baptist Memorial Hospital, Memphis, TN

381.

CORRECTION OF SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM WITH LOW-DOSE INTRAVENOUSCALCITRIOL. 5. Moe, S. Sprague, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

382.

X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIA: A NATURAL HISTORY STUDY IN UNTREATED ADULTS. A. Taylor, M. Norman, Alfred I. DuPont Institute, Wilmington, DE

383.

STRAINING BONE FOR ALUMINUM IN PATIENTS WITH HIGH SERUM ALUMINUM OR WITH OSTElTlS FIBROSA. A. Hodsman, 6. Steer, P. Cordy, Lawson Research Institute, St. Joseph’s Hospital, London, Ontario, Canada

384.

THYMIC DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION IN THE OSTEOPETROTIC RAT. S. Popoff, M. lackson, S. Marks, lr., Temple University School of Medicine, Philadephia, PA, and University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

385.

TREATMENT OF PAGET DISEASE OF BONE WITH HIGH DOSES OF ORAL TILUDRONATE GIVEN DURING A FIVE-DAY COURSE THERAPY. 1. Reginster, M. Lecart, R. Deroisy, N. Sarlet, D. Ethgen, P. Franchimont, University of Liege, Liege, Belgium

386.

GREATER INHIBITION OF BONE NODULE FORMATION WITH METABOLIC THAN RESPIRATORY ACIDOSIS. 1. lacobsen, S. Sprague, N. Krieger, D. Bushinsky, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, and University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

387.

ACIDOSIS INHIBITS OSTEOBLASTIC AND STIMULATES OSTEOCLASTIC ACTIVITY. N. Sessler, N. Krieger, D. Bushinsky, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

388.

PERTURBATIONS OF OSTEOBLAST GENE EXPRESSION DURING SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT IN TWO OSTEOPETROTIC RAT MUTATIONS. V. Shalhoub, 6. lackson, I. ban, C. Stein, S. Marks, /r., University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA

389.

THE SKELETAL MANIFESTATIONS OF MICROPHTHALMIA, A NEW RECESSIVE OSTEOPETROTIC MUTATION IN THE RAT. M. Cielinski, 5. Marks, jr., University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

390.

HYPOPHOSPHATASEMIA IN HYPOPHOSPHATASIA REFLECTS PROPORTIONATELY DECREASED SERUM BONE ALKALINE PHOSPHATASEANTIGEN. M. Whyte, D. Walkenhorst, C. Hill, K. Fedde, Shriners Hospital and Washington University, St. Louis, MO, and Hybritech, Inc., San Diego, CA

391.

DEMOGRAPHIC AND BIOCHEMICAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH GOOD GROWTH RESPONSE TO CALCITRIOL AND PHOSPHATE THERAPY IN X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS. D. Petersen, A. Boniface, M. Whyte, Shriners Hospital and Washington University, St. Louis, MO

392.

HYPERCALCIURIA IS COMMON IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA. A. Chines, D. Petersen, F. Schranck, M. Whyte, Shriners Hospital and Washington University, St. Louis, MO

435-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

393.

THROMBOSPONDIN BINDS TO THE SURFACE OF H U M A N MG-63 OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS AND IS INVOLVED IN PLATELET AGGREGATION INDUCED BY MG-63 CELLS. P. Clezardin, C. Serre, P. Delmas, INSERM Units 331 and 234, Lyon, France

394.

ALUMINUM-INDUCED OSTEOMALACIC CHANGES A N D DECREASED PARATHYROID RESPONSIVENESS I N ASYMPTOMATIC HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS. P. Altmann, P. Revell, F. Marsh, 1. O’Riordan, 1. Cunningham, The London Hospital and The Middlesex Hospital, UK

395.

AN IMMUNORADIOMETRIC ASSAY SPECIFIC FOR THE BONE ISOENZYME OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE. C. Hill, M. Cerrito, E. Grafstein, R. Wolfert, Hybritech Inc., San Diego, CA

396.

THE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC ALUMINUM O N THE RESOLUTION OF A UREMIC A N D DIETARY PHOSPHORUS DEPENDENT MODEL OF OSTEOMALACIA IN RATS. W. Lieuallen, S. Weisbrode, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

397.

COMPARISON OF INTACT, MEDIUM AND CARBOXY TERMINAL ASSAYS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BONE DISEASE IN HEMODIALYZED PATIENTS. M. Cohen-Solal, 1. Sebert, P. Westeel, A. Marie, P. Moriniere, 1. Cueris, R. Bouillon, A. Fournier, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Amiens, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris, France, and Katolicke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium

398.

HIGH DOSE INTRAVENOUS APD IN PAGET’S DISEASE. R. Retallack, D. Cutteridge, G. Kent, R. Price, C. Bhagat, G. Worth, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Au stra Iia

399.

CHANGES ON BONE METABOLISM DURING RADIATION. K. Hamada, 1. Nakamura, K. Shigekawa, S. Matsuura, M . Kataoka, Ehime University, Ehime, Japan

400.

EFFECTS OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE O N VERTEBRAL A N D TlBlAL MINERAL DENSITY IN MILITARY RECRUITS. 1. Casez, E. Stuessi, H. Stalder, A. Gerber, P. )aeger, University Hospital, Berne, Swiss Federal Institution of Technology of Zurich and Hospital of Delemont, Switzerland

401.

BONE MASS AND BONE LOSS AT LUMBAR SPINE, FEMORAL NECK A N D TIBIA IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTED PATIENTS. 1. Casez, B. Schwizer, A. Montandon, P. laeger, University Hospital, Berne, Switzerland

402.

BIOCHEMICAL EVIDENCE OF RACIAL DIFFERENCES I N POSTMENOPAUSAL BONE HOMEOSTASIS IN HEALTHY WHITE A N D BLACK WOMEN. D. Meier, M . Luckey, S. Wallenstein, R. Lapinski, B. Catherwood, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, and VA Medical Center, Atlanta, GA

403.

PROLONGED SUPPRESSION OF BONE TURN-OVER FOLLOWING INDUCED HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN THE BEAGLE. I. Ste-Marie, N. Dion, C. Deschenes, CRC A.-Viallet, Hopital St-Luc, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada

404.

CORRELATION OF INVASIVE AND NONINVASIVE MEASUREMENTS FOR EVALUATING DENERVATION-INDUCED OSTEOPENIA IN RATS. Y. Kharode, 1. Tamasi, ). Marzolf, A. Parikh, R. Mezrich, A. Corbin, F. Bex, Wyeth-Ayerst Research, Princeton, and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ

-S36-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

405.

SKELETAL EFFECTS OF ANDROSTENEDIOL IN THE OVARIECTOMIZED, LACTATING RAT. 1. Anderson, 5. Garner, 1. Parikh, V. Petrow, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Duke University, Durham, NC

406.

19-NOR-ANDROSTENEDIOLSIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES BONE LOSS IN THE OVARIECTOMIZED, LACTATING RAT. 5. Garner, 1. Anderson, /. Parikh, V. Petrow, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Duke University, Durham, NC

407.

BONE DENSITOMETRICAND HISTOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO 2 CYCLES OF ADFR THERAPY FOR OSTEOPOROSIS, USING PARATHORMONE AND CALCITONIN. A. Hodsman, B. Steer, University of Ontario, Ontario, Canada

408.

ASSESSING HUMAN BIOAVAILABILITY POTENTIALS OF CALCIUM SOURCES USING A RAT MODEL. R. Kanerva, M. Andon, The Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH

409.

DUAL ENERGY X-RAY SPINE DENSITOMETRY IN VITRO: CORRELATIONS TO BIOMECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND LATERAL VIEW CHARACTERISTICS. D. Cody, D. McCubbrey, M. Flynn, 1. Kuhn, S. Coldstein, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

410.

ESTROGEN PROTECTS AGAINST THE BONE RESORBING EFFECTS OF (1-34)hPTH INFUSION AS ASSESSED BY BIOMECHANICAL MARKERS. F . Cosman, V. Shen, B. Herrington, M. Seibel, A. Ratcliffe, R. Lindsay, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY, and Columbia University, New York, NY

41 1.

THE LONGITUDINAL CHANGE OF NORMAL HUMAN SPINE MINERAL CONTENT UTILIZING DUAL PHOTON ABSORPTIOMETRY. H. Aratani, S. Hagiwara, K . Iba, T . Miki, Y. Nishizawa, H . Ochi, H. Morii, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan

412.

IS CHRONIC CALCITONIN ADMINISTRATION EFFECTIVE TO RESTORE DECREASED BONE FORMATION IN THE ELDERLY?5. Okuno, Y. Nishizawa, M. Inaba, T. Miki, K. Iba, H . Morii, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan

41 3.

RADIOGRAPHIC ABSORPTIOMETRY: A SIMPLE TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINATION OF LOW BONE MASS. R. Lindsay, F. Cosman, B. Herrington, 5. Himmelstein, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY

414.

WITHDRAWN

41 5.

SERUM COPPER CONCENTRATION, DIETARY CALCIUM INTAKE AND BONE DENSITY IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN: CROSS-SECTIONAL MEASUREMENTS. G. Howard, M. Andon, P. Saltman, 1. Strause, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

41 6.

QUANTITATION OF BONE RESORPTION OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR IN TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY. C. McCarthy, C. Steinberg, E. Wyman, M. Agren, D. Baran, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA

41 7.

BONE DENSITY IN CORTICOSTEROID TREATED PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LUNG DISEASES. N . Dewan, 1. Gallagher, P. Meyers, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

437-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

41 8.

VERTEBRAL TRABECULAR BONE VOLUME IS REDUCED IN AGED FEMALE BABOONS: A POTENTIAL ANIMAL MODEL FOR OSTEOPOROSIS. T. Aufdermorte, C. fox, H . McCuff, K. Buffum, University of Texas, The Southwest Research Institute, and Southwest Foundation For Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX

41 9.

A METHOD FOR LONGITUDINAL STUDIES OF SKELETAL KINETICS IN BABOONS. W. Fox, T. Aufdermorte, H . McCuff, C. Amaud, Southwest Research Institute, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, and The University of California, San Francisco, CA

420.

AN EVALUATION OF DUAL ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY. 6. Lees, Wynn Institute for Metabolic Research, London, UK

421.

PRECISION AND DIAGNOSTIC SENSITIVITY OF DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY. C. Ribot, j . Pouilles, F. Tremollieres, CHU Purpan, Toulouse, France

422.

TOTAL BODY MEASUREMENTS BY DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY AND DUAL-PHOTON ABSORPTIOMETRY. R. Nuti, C. Martini, C. Righi, 6. frediani, V. Turchetti, University of Siena, Siena, Italy

423.

BONE MINERAL DENSITY OF THE SPINE IN LATERAL PROJECTION USING DEXA. M. Denton, R. Eberle, Monarch Foundation, Cincinnati, OH

424.

LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN. H. Barden, R. Mazess, University of Wisconsin, Madison, W I

425.

TAMIXOFEN REDUCES BONE LOSS IN WOMEN WITH BREAST CANCER. R. Mazess, H. Barden, R. Love, University of Wisconsin, Madison, W I

426.

BODY COMPOSITION BY DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY. 1. Haarbo, A. Cotfredsen, C. Hassager, C. Christiansen, Glostrop Hospital, Glostrop, Denmark

427.

1.

Stevenson,

INFLUENCE OF TRUNK STRENGTH O N BONE MINERAL DENSITY OF THE SPINE.

1. Eickhoff, L. Robbins, 1. Ga//agher, 5. Delong, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

428.

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM A LONGITUDINAL CLINICAL STUDY OF ULTRASOUND VELOCITY. C. Brandenburger, L. Avioli, C. Chesnut, ///, R. Heaney, R. Recker, Osteo-Technology Inc., Framingham, MA; Washington University, St. Louis, MO; University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Creighton University, Omaha, NE

429.

CRITICAL FRACTURE GRADIENT: QUANTITATION OF RESPONSE TO SPINAL OSTEOPOROSIS TREATMENT. K . Sakhaee, C. johnston, jr., N. Bell, A. Licata, C. Pak, Dallas, TX, Indianapolis, IN, Charleston, SC and Cleveland, OH

430.

SLOW RELEASE NaF WITH Ca CITRATE PROVIDES SAFETY OF USAGE AND STIMULATES FORMATION OF NORMALLY MINERALIZED BONE OF IMPROVED QUALITY. 1. Zerwekh, P. Antich, C. Pak, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

431.

SURGICAL MENOPAUSE CAUSES A SIGNIFICANT DECREASE I N LUMBAR BONE MINERAL AND SERUM HDL-CHOLESTEROL IN FEMALE CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES. M. layo, D. Weaver, 7. Clarkson, C. Carlson, E. Welles, S. Rankin, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC

438-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29, 1990

432.

CHARACTERIZATION OF SERUM CHEMISTRY MARKERS OF BONE TURNOVER IN SURGICALLY POSTMENOPAUSAL CYNOMOLGUS MACAQUES. E. Welles, M. la yo, D. Weaver, C. Carlson, S. Rankin, Wake Forest University, WinstonSalem, NC

433.

BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN ELDERLY MEN AND WOMEN: THE FRAMINGHAM STUDY. D. Felson, M. Hannan, 1. Anderson, Boston University, Boston, MA

434.

MUSCLE-SPECIFIC TRAINING TO INDUCE SPINAL HYPERTROPHY. D. Cavanaugh, C. Cann, A. Miller, University of California, San Francisco, CA

435.

A METHOD TO PREDICT AN INDIVIDUAL’S FUTURE FRACTURE RISK. C. Cann, K. faulkner, University of California, San Francisco, CA

436.

EFFECT OF 22-OXA-l,25(OH),D, AND 2 BETA-(3-HYDROXY-PROPOXY)1,25(OH),D, ON BONE METABOLISM IN VITRO. K. Sato, K. Miyamoto, Y. Nishii, F . Woodiel, I. Raisz, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Tokyo, Japan, and University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

437.

REDUCED POSTPRANDIALCALCITONIN SECRETION AND INCREASED URINARY EXCRETION IN OSTEOPOROTICWOMEN. E. Holt, D. Ontjes, T . Gray, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

438.

CYCLICAL VERSUS DAILY CONTINUOUS HORMONAL THERAPY FOR OSTEOPOROSIS. C. fuleihan, E. Brown, K . Curtis, R. Cleason, M. LeBoff, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

439.

CYCLOSPORIN A-ASSOCIATED OSTEOPOROSIS IN CARDIAC TRANSPLANT PATIENTS. C. Rich, C. Mudge, M. LeBoff, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

440.

EFFECT OF HIGH DOSES ON VITAMIN D, MODERATE DOSES OF CALCITONIN AND CALCIUM ON BONE DENSITY OF THE SPINE AND HIP IN OSTEOPOROSIS. M. Moinuddin, 1. Buchignani, C. Palmieri, M. Edwards, 0. Palmer, 1. Karas, Baptist Memorial Hospital and University of Tennessee at Memphis, Memphis, TN

441.

COMBINED AND SEPARATE INTERMITTENT ADMINISTRATION O F LOW DOSE HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE FRAGMENT (1 -34) AND 17p ESTRADIOL IN OVARIECTOMIZED RATS: DIFFERING EFFECTS ON BONE MINERAL DENSITY AND VITAMIN D LEVELS. V. Shen, R. Mellish, R. Birchman, D. Dempster, R. Lindsay, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY, and Columbia University, New York, NY

442.

CORTISONE INDUCED OSTEOPOROSIS IS ASSOCIATED WITH AN INCREASE IN SPECIFIC ACTIVITY OF SKELETAL ADENYLATE CYCLASE BUT NOT AN INCREASED RESPONSE TO PTH. R. Rude, H. Cruber, S. Oldham, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

443.

OVARIECTOMY AND INFUSION OF RAT PARATHYROID HORMONE FRAGMENT (1-34) IN THYROPARATHYROIDECTOMIZED RATS: INDEPENDENT EFFECTS ON 1,25 VITAMIN D, LEVELS, CANCELLOUS BONE VOLUME, OSTEOCLAST AND OSTEOBLAST SURFACE. R. Mellish, R. Birchman, V . Shen, W. Horbert, 7. Clemens, N . Horiuchi, D. Dempster, R. Lindsay, Helen Hayes Hospital, West Haverstraw, NY, Columbia University, New York, NY, and Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

439-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

444.

RACIAL DIFFERENCESIN BONE DENSITY. €. Smith, R. Weinstein, Medical Collegeof Georgia, Augusta, GA

445.

ESTROGEN AND DIPHOSPHONATE TREATMENT PROVIDE LONG-TERM PROTECTION AGAINST VERTEBRAL OSTEOPENIA I N OVARIECTOMIZED RATS. T. Wronski, C. Yen, K. Scott, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

446.

HIGH TURNOVER OSTEOPOROSIS ASSOCIATED WITH CUTANEOUS MASTOCYSTOSIS: EFFECT OF TREATMENT WITH KETOTIFEN. B. MacDonald, 6 . Shenstone, A. Bhalla, Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK

447.

TRABECULAR SEPARATION IS RELATED TO THE NUMBER OF RESORBING CELLS IN OSTEOPOROTIC PATIENTS. M. Cohen-Sold, C. Morieux, M. de Vernejoul, INSERM U18, Paris, France

448.

CIGARETTE SMOKING MODIFIES THE EFFECT OF ORAL ESTROGENS ON HIP FRACTURE RISK. D. Kiel, 1. Baron, 1. Anderson, D. Felson, Brown University, Providence, RI, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, and Boston University Arthritis Center, Boston, M A

449.

TOLERANCE TO DOSE OF CALCITRIOL IS ASSOCIATED WITH IMPROVED BONE DENSITY IN WOMEN WITH POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS. S. Ott, C. Chesnut, 111, University of Washington, Seattle, W A

450.

THE EFFECT OF SYMPATHECTOMY, CAPSAlClN DENERVATION, A N D TAILSUSPENSION ON PLASMA CALClTONlN LEVELS I N RATS. €. Hill, S. Arnaud, P. Fung, C. Cone, E. Morey-Holton, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA

451.

SYNTHESIS AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF AMINO TERMINAL PTHrP ANALOGUES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RECEPTOR-LIGAND INTERACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF PTH/PTHrP ANTAGONISTS. H . lueppner, A. Abou-Samra, S. Uneno, H. Keutmann, 1. Potts, jr., C. Segre, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

452.

MUTANT SIGNAL SEQUENCE OF PREPROPARATHYROID HORMONE DIRECTS INEFFICIENT MEMBRANE PROTEOLYTIC PROCESSING. A. Karaplis, H . Baba, A. Arnold, H. Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, M A

453.

EFFECT OF EXPERIMENTAL HUMAN MAGNESIUM DEPLETION ON PTH SECRETION AND 1,25(OH)2-VITAMIN D SYNTHESIS. S. Fatemi, E. Ryzen, D. Endres, R. Rude, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

454.

PTH INCREASES THE mRNA FOR AND SECRETION OF TISSUE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR I N CULTURED RAT CALVARIAL OSTEOBLASTS. B. Catherwood, M. Nanes, L. Titus, E. jackson, 1. Rubin. VA Medical Center and Emory University, Atlanta, GA

455.

OCTREOTIDE, A SOMATOSTATIN ANALOG, REDUCES URINARY CALCIUM EXCRETION IN CHILDREN. C. Palmier;, D. Nutting, €. Schriock, T . Bertorini, H. Sacks, 1. Bittle, 1. Griffin, 8. Elmendorf, M. Edwards, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN

-S40-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

456.

COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF DI- AND TRIVALENT CATIONS ON CAMP, INOSITOL PHOSPHATES AND PTH RELEASE IN BOVINE PARATHYROID CELLS. E. Brown, C. Fuleihan, 0. Kifor, C. Chen, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and The Children’s Hospital, Boston, M A

457.

EFFECTS OF CON A ON THE REGULATION OF SECOND MESSENGERS AND PTH RELEASE BY Ca2+ IN BOVINE PARATHYROIDCELLS. C. Fuleihan, 0.Kofor, C. Katz, E. Brown, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, M A

458.

WITH DRAWN

459.

SHORT-TERMACTIVATION OF ALKALINE PHOSPHATASEBY PTH I N CHONDROCYTE CULTURES IS DEPENDENT ON CHONDROGENIC DIFFERENTIATION. R. Comez, Z. Schwartz, L. Swain, S. Semba, 6. Boyan, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, and Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

460.

PHARMACOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL COMPARISON OF H U M A N RENAL AND SKELETAL PTH RECEPTORS. 1. Orloff, D. Coumas, T. Wu, A. Stewart, VA Medical Center, West Haven, and Yale University, New Haven, CT

461.

CORRELATION OF RENAL FUNCTION WITH ELEVATIONS I N C-TERMINAL PTHRELATED PROTEIN. 1. Orloff, W . Burtis, VA Medical Center, West Haven, and Yale University, New Haven, CT

462.

MOLECULAR BASIS OF ECTOPIC PTH SECRETION IN AN OVARIAN CANCER: CHARACTERIZATION OF ITS AMPLIFIED A N D REARRANGED PTH GENE. S. Nussbaum, M. Nardik, A. Arnold, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

463.

DEXAMETHASONE SUPPRESSES PHOSPHOLIPASEC ACTIVATION IN ROS 1712.8 CELLS. 1. Clusman, 6 . Morrow, 1. Bilezikian, College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY

464.

PARATHYROID HORMONES STIMULATE PRODUCTION OF PROSTAGLANDINS AND IL-6 BY HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. A. Cupta, A. Morrison, H. Welgus, D. Lacey, H. Mizutani, T. Kupper, K. Hruska, Jewish and Barnes Hospitals, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

465.

EFFECTS OF LOW CALCIUM DIET AND NICARBAZIN O N AVIAN PARATHYROID RNA AND PRE-PROPARATHYROID HORMONE mRNA IN VIVO. 1. Russell, S. Hurwitz, A. Bar, L. Sherwood, Albert Einstein College, Bronx, NY, Volcani Institute, Rehovot, Israel, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, Nj

466.

PARATHYROID SECRETION GRANULE POPULATIONS DISPLAY DIFFERENCES IN PHOSPHOLIPID SYNTHESIS. K. Kraft, 1. Hamilton, VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, and Kansas Medical School, Kansas City, KS

467.

PROCESSING OF CHROMOGRANIN-A BY SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS OF BOVINE PARATHYROID GLANDS. 6. Drees, 1. Hamilton, VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, and Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

468.

NEOMYCIN MIMICS THE EFFECTS OF HIGH EXTRACELLULAR Ca2+ ON DISPERSED BOVINE PARATHYROID CELLS. C. Chen, R. Butters, C. Katz, 0. Kifor, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, M A

469.

ELEVATED PTH-RELATED PEPTIDE IN CORD BLOOD OF TERM A N D PREMATURE NEONATES. L. Hillman, 1. Forte, P. Thorne, L. johnson, S. Allen, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

470.

PARATHY ROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE, PARATHYROID HORMONE A N D CALCITON I N LEVELS IN PSE U DO-HY POPARATHYROI DlSM A N D HYPOPARATHYROIDISM. S. Allen, L. Forte, 5. Clark, P. Thorne, W . Nichols, F. Mitchell, University of Missouri and Harry S. Truman VA Hospital, Columbia, MO

471.

NOVEL ANALOGUES OF EEL AND HUMAN CALCITONINS. C. Basava, K. Hostetler. Vical Inc., San Diego, CA

472.

PROPERTIES OF PARATHYROID HORMONE (1-34) ANALOGS MODIFIED AT POSITIONS 3 AND 6. R. Nissenson, M. Bradley, M. Carlquist, M. Nilsson, F. Cohen, C. Strewler, VA Medical Center and University of California, San Francisco, CA, and Karo Bio AB, Huddinge, Sweden

473.

A STRUCTURAL MODEL OF THE RENAL PARATHYROID HORMONE/PTHRELATED PROTEIN RECEPTOR. D. Karpf, T. Bambino, C. Alford, R. Nissenson, VA Medical Center and University of California, San Francisco, CA

*474.

TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATION OF G S a EXPRESSION I N F9 TERATOCARCINOMA CELLS BY RETlNOlC ACID AND PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN. S. Chan, C. Strewler, R. Nissenson, VA Medical Center and University of California, San Francisco, CA

475.

COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS FORMS OF SYNTHETIC HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE OF MALIGNANCY O N BONE RESORPTION AND FORMATION IN ORGAN CULTURE. C. Alander, C. Pilbeam, H. Simmons, L. Raisz, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

476.

WITH DRAWN

477.

PANCREATIC AMYLIN INDUCES HYPOCALCEMIA A N D ANTAGONIZES INSULIN ACTION ON CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN THE RAT. S. Koopmans, H. Krans, C. van der Pluijm, C. Lowik, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

478.

PARATHYROID HORMONE AND PROSTAGLANDIN STIMULATION OF CAMP ACCUMULATION IN UMR-106 OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. H. Koch, H. Muir, F. Hough, The Tygerberg Hospital and University of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg, Republic of South Africa

479.

EFFECTS OF SPACE FLIGHT O N SERUM PARATHYROID HORMONE A N D CALCITONIN IN RATS. S. Arnaud, P. Fung, 1. Popova, A. Kiplansky, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, and The Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, USSR

-S42-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

480.

POSSIBLE CANDIDATES FOR MACROPHAGE FUSION FACTOR PRESENT I N CONDITIONED MEDIUM OF CONCANAVALIN A-TREATED SPLEEN CELL CULTURES. E. Abe, C. )in, Y. Ishima, M. Hong, 1. Abrams, N.Arai, T. Suda, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan, and DNAX Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA

481.

BINDING OF PARATHYROID HORMONE AND PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN TO HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS-1 INFECTED LYMPHOCYTES. I. McCauley, T . Rosol, C. Capen, Ohio State University, Colurnbus, OH

482.

CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYCLONAL AND MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN. T. Rosol, 1. Merryman, 1. McCauley, C. Steinmeyer, D. Swayne, C. Capen, Ohio State University, Colurnbus, OH

483.

THE ROLE OF SERUM CALCIUM IN THE REGULATION OF VITAMIN D METABOLISM IN HUMORAL HYPERCALCEMIA OF MALIGNANCY. T . Hongo, T . Clemens, N . Horiuchi, F.R. Singer, Cedars-Sinai Medical CenteriUCLA, Los Angeles, CA

484.

REPEATED INJECTION OF MOUSE INTERFERON-GAMMA DECREASES SERUM CALCIUM CONCENTRATION IN TUMOR-BEARING HYPERCALCEMIC NUDE MICE. T . Satoh, K. Sato, K. Shizume, K. Yamazaki, H. Demura, Institute for Growth Science in Japan, Tokyo Women’s Medical College and Kanaji Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

485.

PROLONGED NORMALIZATION OF SERUM CALCIUM CONCENTRATION BY REPEATED INJECTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTI-PTHrP(1-34) ANTIBODY IN HYPERCALCEMIC, TUMOR-BEARING NUDE MICE. K. Sato, T. Satoh, K. Shizume, H . Ohkawa, K. Ohsumi, H. Sakurai, K. Demura, Tokyo Women’s Medical College, Research Institute of Growth Science in Japan, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., and Mitsubishi Yuka BCL, Tokyo, Japan

486.

EFFECTS OF HYDROCORTISONE AND CALCITONIN ON PTH-RELATED PROTEIN GENE EXPRESSION AND SECRETION IN H U M A N CANCER CELLS. K. Kasono, K. Sato, 0. Isozaki, Y. Sato, K. Shizume, T. Tsushima, H . Demura, Tokyo Women‘s Medical College, and Institute for Growth Science, Tokyo, Japan

487.

POTENTIAL MECHANISM(S) OF INHIBITION OF PTH STIMULATED CAMP IN UMR-106-01 CELLS BY TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR. C. Hanevold, D. Yamaguchi, S. lordon, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

488.

ORAL TOXICITY OF la-HYDROXYVITAMIN D, IN RATS. C. Bishop, C. Valliere, 1. Knutson, H. DeLuca, R. Mazess, Bone Care International, Inc., and University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

489.

490.

EVIDENCE FOR INCREASED INTESTINAL VITAMIN D RECEPTOR CONTENT IN GENETIC HYPERCALCIURIC RATS. X. Li, D. Bushinsky, V. Tembe, M. favus, The University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, and The University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY ABNORMAL VITAMIN D METABOLISM I N PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA.

1. Mandry, M . Browne, B. Hollis, C. Eil, Brown University, Providence, RI, and Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

443-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

491.

ISOLATION OF INTRON-CONTAINING THYMOSIN p4 GENE I N THE PRESENCE OF MULTIPLE RETROPOSONS. S. Varghese, H. Kronenberg, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, M A

492.

22-oxa-1 a,25(OH),D3 IS NOT AS EFFECTIVE AS 1,25(OH),D IN CORRECTING STEROID INDUCED OSTEOPENIA. M. Takizawa, 6. Stein, S. Epstein, M. Fallon, Albert Einstein Medical Center, and Thomas Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA

493.

CYCLOSPORIN A INCREASES ENDOGENOUS PRODUCTION OF 1,25(Oti),D # l . C. Engstrom, T. Reinhardt, 1. Adams, S. Epstein, B. Stein, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Ames, IA, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, and Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA

494.

CYCLOSPORIN A INCREASES ENDOGENOUS PRODUCTION OF 1,25(OH),D #2. S. Epstein, B. Stein, 6. Halloran, M. Takizawa, Albert Einstein Medical Center, Phi ladelphia, PA

495.

THE EFFECTS OF 22-oxa-la,25(OH),D3 ON BONE MINERAL METABOLISM IN NORMAL RATS. M. Takizawa, 6. Stein, S. Epstein, M. Fallon, Albert Einstein Medical Center and Thomas Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, PA

496.

REGULATION OF CALBINDIN-D9K GENE EXPRESSION BY 1 7 4 ESTRADIOL I N THE RAT UTERUS. F. L’Horset, C. ferret, A. Brehier, M. Thomasset, INSERM U120, Le Vesinet, France

497.

THE HUMAN MYELOMONOCYTIC CELL LINE U937 AS A MODEL FOR STUDYING ALTERATIONS IN MONOKINE GENE EXPRESSION BY 1,25-DlHYDROXYVITAMIN D. I. Prehn, D. fagan, 1. Adams, S. lordan, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

498.

MODULATION OF HUMAN NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D. D. Fagan, A. Luce, P. Cox, /. Adams, 1. Lemire, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, and University of Texas School of Medicine, Houston, TX

499.

EVIDENCE FOR ENDOGENOUS BLOCKADE OF CELLULAR 1,25-DlHYDROXYVITAMIN D-RECEPTOR BINDING IN NEW WORLD PRIMATES. M . Cacad, /. Adams, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

500.

CONSTITUTIVE EXPRESSION OF A 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN D,-1 -HYDROXYLATION REACTION IN THE AVIAN MYELOMONOCYTIC CELL LINE HD-11. /. Adams, T. Beeker, T. Hongo, T. Clemens, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

501.

TRANSGLUTAMINASE IS INVOLVED IN THE FUSION OF MOUSE ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES INDUCED BY la,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D,. H. Tanaka, T. Shinki, 1. Takito, C. /in, T. Suda, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

502.

TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASESTHE HEPATIC AND RENAL NUCLEAR VITAMIN D RECEPTOR IN CASTRATED BUT NOT IN INTACT MALE RATS. W. Duncan, A. Class, H . Wray, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC

444-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

503.

THE VITAMIN D RECEPTOR: IN VITRO PHOSPHORYLATION A N D EXPRESSION OF MUTANTS IN TRANSFERRED CV-1 CELLS. 6. )ones, P. jurutka, C. Haussler, M. Haussler, G. Whitfield, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

504.

THE VITAMIN D RECEPTOR IN RAT OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS IS PHOSPHORYLATED IN RESPONSE TO 1,25(OH),D3, IN VIVO, A N D BY CASEIN KINASE I I IN VITRO. P. lurutka, C. Terpening, M. Haussler, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ

505.

25-HYDROXYLATION OF SYNTHETIC 1-HYDROXY-DIHYDROTACHYSTEROLS: COMPARISON WITH IN VlVO METABOLITES IN THE RAT. F. Qaw, M. Calverley, N . Schroeder, H . Makin, D. Trafford, G. )ones, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, Leo Pharmaceutical Products, Denmark, and London Hospital Medical College, London, UK

506.

METABOLISM OF 24-OXA-1 HYDROXYVITAMIN D3 BY CULTURED LIVER CELLS. S. Strugnell, M. Calverley, C. )ones, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, and Leo Pharmaceutical Products, Denmark

507.

EFFECTS OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS O N THE DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION OF THE RAT INTESTINAL 1,25 DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, RECEPTOR GENE. S. lee, M. Szlachetka, S. Christakos, UMDNJ-NewJerseyMedical School, Newark, NJ

508.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE CHROMOSOMAL MAP POSITION OF THE HUMAN CALBINDIN-D,,, GENE. W . Mod;, H . Seuanez, S. Christakos, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, and University of New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ

509.

DIFFERENTIAL REGULATION OF THE EXPRESSION OF T W O VITAMIN D-DEPENDENT CALCIUM BINDING PROTEIN GENES IN MOUSE KIDNEY. H. l i , S. Christakos, UMDNJ-NewJersey Medical School, Newark, NJ

510.

CORTICOSTERONE REGULATES CALBINDIN-D,,K mRNA A N D PROTEIN IN RAT HIPPOCAMPUS. A. lacopino, S. Christakos, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ

511.

25-HYDROXYVITAMIN Dj-la-HYDROXYLASE IN PORCINE HEPATIC TISSUE: SUBCELLULAR LOCALIZATION TO BOTH MITOCHONDRIA A N D MICROSOMES. 6. Hollis, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

512.

MECHANISMS FOR 1,25(OH),D3 GENERATION BY HUMAN MACROPHAGES. A. Dusso, ). Finch, E. Slatopolsky, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

51 3.

DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF 1,25(OH),D, AND 22-OXYCALCITRIOL O N CALCIUM AND PO, METABOLISM. 1. Finch, A. Brown, A. Dusso, T. Mori, Y. Nishii, E. Slatopolsky, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Chugai Pharmaceutical Company, Tokyo, Japan

514.

ON THE MECHANISMS FOR THE SELECTIVE ACTION OF VITAMIN D ANALOGS. A. Dusso, S. Lopez-Hilker, 1. Finch, T. Mori, Y. Nishii, E. Slatopolsky, A. Brown, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Chugai Pharmaceutical Company, Tokyo, Japan

445-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

515.

THE ACTIVITY OF 22-OXYCALCITRIOL IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE(ROS 1 7/2.8) CELLS. N. Pernalete, J. Mori, Y. Nishii, E. Slatopolsky, A. Brown, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, and Chugai Pharmaceutical Company, Tokyo, Japan

51 6.

DIETARY POTASSIUM DEPRIVATION INCREASES DAILY A N D FASTING URINARY CALCIUM EXCRETION IN HEALTHY MEN. 1. Lemann, jr., 1. Pleuss, R. Gray, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, W I OSTEOCLASTS-Peachtree Ballroom I

1:15 P.M.-

3:30 P.M. CHAIRPERSONS-Philip A. Osdoby G. David Roodrnan

1:15 P.M.

51 7.

OSTEOCLASTS EXPRESS mRNA FOR ESTROGEN RECEPTOR. M. Ourder, 1. Pyfferoen, P. Osdoby, 6. Riggs, J. Spelsberg, Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN, and Washington University, St. Louis, MO

1:30 P.M.

51 8.

PARATHYROID HORMONE RECEPTORS IDENTIFIED ON AVIAN A N D RAT OSTEOCLASTS. I. Duong, W . Crasser, P. DeHaven, M. Sato, Merck Sharp & Dohrne Research Labs., West Point, PA

1:45 P.M.

51 9.

AFFINITY PURIFIED ANTIBODIES REVEAL THE PRESENCE OF (PR0)COLLAGENASE IN THE SUBOSTEOCLASTIC BONE RESORBING COMPARTMENT. R. Baron, Y. Eeckhout, L. Neff, C. Francois-Gillet, P. Henriet, 1. Delaisse, C. Vaes, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and University of Louvain, Brussels, Belgium

2:OO P.M.

520.

ARC-GLY-ASP CELL BINDING SEQUENCE PEPTIDES INDUCE OSTEOCLASTIC SHAPE CHANGE AND INHIBIT BONE RESORPTION. M. Horton, M. Helfrich, I. Taylor, T. Amett, St. Bartholornew’s Hospital, and University College, London, UK

2:15 P.M.

521.

ECHISTATIN INHIBITS BONE RESORPTION BY BLOCKING OSTEOCLAST BINDING TO BONE. M. Sato, W . Crasser, 1. Murray, R. Could, Merck Sharp & Dohrne Research Labs., West Point, and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

2:30 P.M.

522.

ACTIVATION OF ISOLATED OSTEOCLASTS BY LYSOSOMAL PROCATHEPSIN D AND RELATED MOLECULES. C. Lee, I. Bonewald, C. Wo, 1. Chirgwin, H. Rochefort, F. Caponey, C. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, and Universite Montpellier, France

2:45 P.M.

523.

IDENTIFICATION OF SINGLE ION CHANNELS IN NEONATAL RAT OSTEOCLASTS. N. Schoppa, Y. Su, R. Baron, E. Bodpaep, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

3:OO P.M.

524.

THE ( ~ 2 AND THE INTEGRIN RECEPTORS MEDIATE THE COLLAGENINDUCED RELEASE OF IL-1 FROM HUMAN MONOCYTES. R. Pacific;, R. McCracken, L. Rifas, L. Halstead, L. Avioli, The Jewish Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

-S46-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

3:15 P.M

525.

TRANSCRIPTION OFEARLY GENESINDUCEDBY INTERLEUKIN-i'p DISSOCIATED FROM EFFECTS ON EXPRESSION OF LATE GENES (PROCOLLAGENASE, PROSTOMELYSIN). W. Conca, P. Auron, H. Welgus, S. Krane, 1. Cehrke, Mass. General HospitaVHarvard Med. School and Center for Blood Research, Boston, MA, Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO, and Mass. Inst. Technology, Cambridge, MA HEREDITARY BONE DISEASE

1:15 P.M.3:30 P.M.

CHAIRPERSONS-Laura S. Hillman Sandy Marks, Jr. 1:15 P.M.

526.

CROSS-TRANSPLANTATION OF KIDNEYS IN NORMAL A N D HYP-MICE: EVIDENCE THAT THE HYP PHENOTYPE IS UNRELATED T O A N INTRINSIC RENAL DEFECT. 7. Nesbitt, 7. Coffman, M. Drezner, Duke University and VA Medical Centers, Durham, NC

1 :30 P.M.

527.

PRIMARY CULTURE OF HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC PROXIMAL TUBULE CELLS EXPRESS DEFECTIVE ADAPTATION T O PHOSPHATE. C. Dobre, U . Alvarez, K. Hruska, Jewish Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

1:45 P.M.

528.

NORMAL MICE JOINEDBY PARABlOSlS ADAPT T O PHOSPHATE RESTRICTION. R. Meyer, Ir., H. Tenenhouse, R. Gray, H . Meyer, Marquette University, McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, W I

2:OO P.M.

529.

EFFECT OF PHOSPHATE SUPPLEMENTATION ON BONE FORMATION BY TRANSPLANTED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC CELLS. B. Ecarot-Charrier, M. Desbarats, R. Travers, L. Labelle, F. Clorieux, Shriners Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Canada

2:15 P.M.

530.

CLINICAL SEVERITY OF X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS: A MAJOR DETERMINANT OF THE GROWTH RESPONSE T O CALCITRIOL A N D PHOSPHORUS THERAPY. N. Friedman, M. €cons, M. Drezner, Duke University, Durham, NC

2:30 P.M.

531.

EXPRESSION OF MUTANT PROALPHA 2 COLLAGEN I N TYPE IV 01FIBROBLASTS A N D OSTEOBLASTS. 5. Chipman, M. Stover, M. McKinstry, D. Rowe, 1. Shapiro, St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, M A , and University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

2:45 P.M.

532.

BONE DENSITY: EVIDENCE FOR GENE INTERACTIONS. 1. Christian, C. Slemenda, C. Williams, C. johnston, Ir., Indiana University, Indianapolis, I N

3:OO P.M.

533.

EFFECTS OF INTERLEUKIN-2 ON BONE RESORPTION IN OSTEOPETROTIC RATS. C. Schneider, 1. Kelly, M. Relfson, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL

3:15 P.M.

534.

RESTORATION OF OSTEOCLAST FORMATION A N D BONE RESORPTION I N OSTEOPETROTIC OP/OP MICE I N VlVO BY RECOMBINANT H U M A N MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR. R. Felix, H. Fleisch, M. Cecchini, University of Berne, Switzerland

447-

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 29,1990

WORKSHOP A-Spanish, Georgian, and Confederate Rooms-Level EVOLVING CONCEPTS OF OSTEOMALACIA

3:45 P.M.5:45 P.M.

7

WORKSHOP B-English, French, and American Rooms-Level 7 MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF GENE EXPRESSION BY CALCIOTROPIC HORMONES ASBMR BUSINESS MEETING AND AWARDS CEREMONY

5145P.M.6:45 P.M.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

a:oo A.M.-

VITAMIN D-II

1O:OO A.M. CHAIRPERSONS-Marie DeMay Ronald L. Horst 8:OO A.M.

535.

THE MOLECULAR BASIS OF HEREDITARY 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D3 RESISTANT RICKETS IN SEVEN RELATED FAMILIES. P. Malloy, Z. Hochberg, D. Tiosano, 1. Pike, M . Hughes, D. feldman, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, Ramban Medical Center, Haifa, Israel, and Baylor University, Houston, TX

8:15 A.M.

536.

VITAMIN D RECEPTOR INHIBITS CALCITONIN GENE EXPRESSION THROUGH INTERFERENCE WITH A CAMP-INDUCED ENHANCER. 5. Peleg, C.W. Cooper, R. Abruzzese, R. Gagel, VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX

8:30 A.M.

537.

EXPRESSION AND LARGE SCALE PURIFICATION OF RECOMBINANT H U M A N VITAMIN D RECEPTOR FROM S. CERVISIAE. T. Sone, D. McDonnell, B. O’MaIley, 1. Pike, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

8:45 A.M.

538.

IDENTIFICATION OF A NOVEL 1 ,25(0H),D3-RESPONSIVE PROTEIN IN H U M A N LYMPHOCYTES: IMMUNOLOGIC CROSSREACTIVITY A N D INVERSE REGULATION WITH VDR. X. Yu, H . Mocharla, f . Hustmyer, L. Maianu, W . Carvey, 5. Manolagas, VA Medical Center and Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN

9:OO A.M.

539.

1,25(OH),D3 PRIMES BONE MARROW MACROPHAGE PRECURSORS FOR RESPONSE TO REGULATORY STIMULI BY INCREASING CELL Ca A N D ACTIVATING PROTEIN KINASE. H. Tanaka, 5. Teitelbaum, K. Hruska, Jewish Hospital at Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

9:15 A.M.

540.

1 ,25(OH),D3 AMPLIFIES ITS EFFECTS O N THE PARATHYROID HORMONE GENE BY INCREASING THE 1,25(OH),D3 RECEPTORGENE EXPRESSION IN VlVO IN THE RAT. T. Naveh-Many, R. Marks, E. Keshet, 1. Pike, 1. Silver, Hadassah Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel, and Bay lor College, Houston, TX

9:30 A.M.

541.

REGULATION OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION BY GROWTH FACTORS. A. Krishnan, D. Feldman, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

9:45 A.M.

542.

PURIFICATION AND AMINO TERMINAL SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF CYTOCHROME P-450 ASSOCIATED WITH 25-OH-VITAMIN D 1a-HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY. R. Gray, L. Savatski, D. Schrab, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, W I

1O:OO A.M.10:15 A.M.

Coffee Break

lot1 5 A.M.12:15 P.M.

OSTEOBLASTS: GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION CHAIRPERSONSJoan K. Heath Barbara E. Kream

10:15 A.M.

543.

RESTORATION OF PROTEIN-DNA INTERACTIONS CHARACTERISTIC OF THE PROMOTER ELEMENTS OF A CELL GROWTH A N D DIFFERENTIATION GENE IN RAT OSTEOSARCOMA 17/2.8 CELLS GROWN AT HIGH DENSITY. S. Smock, S. Yocurn, 7. Owen, 1. Lian, 1. Stein, C. Stein, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, M A

10:30 A.M.

544.

A REGION OF RAT OSTEOCALCIN GENE WHICH MEDIATES FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR SUPPRESSION OF THE GENE TRANSCRIPTION. M. Noda, R. Vogel, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs., West Point, PA

10:45 A.M.

545.

EFFECTS OF C-FOS ON BONE AND CARTILAGE DIFFERENTIATION IN TRANSGENIC AND CHlMAERlC MICE. A. Crigoriadis, Z. Wang, U. Mohle-Steinlein, K . Schellander, E. Wagner, Research Institute of Molecular Pathology, Vienna, Austria

11 :00 A.M.

546.

TRANSIENT INDUCTION OF THE PROTO-ONCOGENE FOS DURING PRE- AND POSTNATAL RAT BONE DEVELOPMENT. M. Machwate, P. Marie, A. julienne, M. Moukhtar, Hopital Lariboisiere and Hopital St. Antoine, Paris, France

11:15 A.M.

547.

RETlNOlC ACID INDUCTION OF THE EARLY GENE ZIF268/EGR-l DURING OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION. L. Suva, C. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs., West Point, PA

11 :30 A.M.

548.

BONE INDUCTION BY HUMAN RECOMBINANT OSTEOGENIN A N D PURIFICATION, CHARACTERIZATION OF OSTEOGENIC ACTIVITY OF RECOMBINANT BMP-2b. R. Hammonds, )r., R. Schwall, A. Dudley, C. La;, L. Berkemeier, N . Cunningham, A. Reddi, W. Wood, A. Mason, Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA, and NIDR, NIH, Bethesda, MD

1 1 :45 A.M.

549.

IDENTIFICATION OF A NEW OSTEOBLAST MITOGEN FROM A H U M A N PROSTATE CANCER CELL LINE, PC-3. S. Rabbani, j. Desjardins, A. Bell, D. Banville, D. Coltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, National Research Council of Canada and Biotech. Research Institute, Montreal, Canada

12:oo Noon

550.

GLUCOCORTICOID CONTROL OF TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR p BINDING AND EFFECTS IN OSTEOBLAST-ENRICHED CULTURES FROM FETAL RAT BONE. M. Centrella, 7. McCarthy, E. Canalis, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, and The University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT

-s49-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

POSTER SESSION 111

12:15 P.M.2:15 P.M.

551-662 623-639 640-672 673-71 9 720-757 758-786

Bone Cell Biology Matrix Proteins Metabolic Bone Disease Osteoporosis Calciotropic Peptides Vitamin D

551.

EVIDENCE FOR A N EFFECT OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-I ON (Y l ( 1 ) PROCOLLAGEN mRNA STABILITY I N CULTURED FETAL RAT CALVARIAE. P. Krebsbach, D. Petersen, 8. Kream, The University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

552.

TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-(YINHIBITS PROCOLLAGEN GENE EXPRESSION IN OSTEOBLASTIC MC3T3-El CELLS. 1. Harrison, D. LaFrancis, f . Fall, 1. Raisz, 8. Kream, The University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT

553.

CALClTONlN INHIBITS RNA SYNTHESIS A N D MITOCHONDRIAL N A D H DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY I N ISOLATED RAT OSTEOCLASTS. M. Zheng, 1. fapadimitriou, C. Nicholson, The University of Western Australia, Frernantle Hospital and QEll Medical Center, Western Australia

554.

RECOMBINANT BMP-2A BONE INDUCTION I N A RAT ORTHOTOPIC MODEL. A. Yasko, 1. lane, E. Fellinger, 1. Cross, D. Classer, The Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

555.

ASCORBIC ACID-INDUCED EXPRESSION OF THE OSTEOBLAST PHENOTYPE: RELATIONSHIP TO COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS A N D INTEGRIN MEDIATED CELL: EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX INTERACTIONS. R. Franceschi, 8. lyer, University of Texas Dental Branch, Houston, TX

556.

BONE-INDUCED OSTEOCLASTS ARE ACTIVE I N THE ABSENCE OF ADDED RESORPTIVE AGENTS. R. lilka, VA Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, and Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, KS

557.

PROTEIN KINASE C REGULATES THE ORGANIZATION OF THE CYTOSKELETON I N OSTEOCLASTS.A. Teti, S. Colucci, M. Crano, I. Argentino, A. Zambonin-Zallone, Universita di Bari, Italy

558.

INTERLEUKIN-4 AS A POTENT INHIBITOR OF BONE RESORPTION. K. Watanabe, Y. Tanaka, 1. Morimoto, S. €to, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan

559.

EFFECT OF COCULTURED FIBROBLAST-LIKE CELLS A N D OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS ON BEHAVIOR OF ISOLATED OSTEOCLASTS. 1. Kanehisa, M. Takeuchi, T. Fuji;, H. Takeuchi, Asahi University School of Dentistry, G i fu, Japan

560.

EFFECT OF EHDP ON BONE FORMATION I N VITRO. H. Tenenbaum, M. Torontali, H. Mamujee, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital and Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

561.

EFFECT OF PULSATILE ADMINISTRATION OF EHDP ON BONE FORMATION I N VIVO. H. Tenenbaum, 1. Heersche, M . Torontali, R. Homareau, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital and Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Canada

562.

RECOMBINANT H U M A N BMP-2 STIMULATES OSTEOBLASTIC MATURATION A N D INHIBITS MUSCLE CELL DIFFERENTIATION I N THE PLURIPOTENTIAL RAT OSTEOBLASTIC CELL LINE ROB-C26. A. Yamaguchi, T. Katagiri, T. Ikeda, S.Yoshiki, 1. Wozney, V. Rosen, E. Wang, A. Kahn, T. Suda, Showa University, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan, Genetics Institute Inc., Cambridge, MA, and UCSF School of Dentistry, San Francisco, CA

563.

THE MARROW-DERIVED STROMAL CELL LINE INDUCES DIFFERENTIATION OF NOT ONLY SPLEEN CELLS BUT ALSO MATURE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES INTO OSTEOCLAST-LIKE CELLS. N . Udagawa, N. Takahashi, T. Akatsu, H . Tanaka, T. Sasaki, T . Nishihara, T. Koga, T . Suda, School of Dentistry, Showa University, Tokyo and National Institute of Health, Tokyo, Japan

564.

PDGF ENHANCES CELL PROLIFERATION A N D CHEMOTAXIS I N OSTEOBLASTLIKE CELL. 7. Tsukamoto, 7. Matsui, M . Fukase, M. Nakai, T. Fujita, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

565.

TGF-P A N D DEXAMETHASONE STIMULATE THROMBOSPONDIN SECRETION BY MG-63 OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS A N D CAUSE A N INCREASE I N CELL ATTACHMENT TO THROMBOSPONDIN. C. Chenu, /. Lepore, P. Clezardin, P. Delmas, INSERM Unit 234, Lyon, France

566.

BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN 2b STIMULATES MITOGENESIS, ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY A N D COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS I N OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. 7. Chen, R. Bates, A. Dudley, E. Amento, R. Hammonds,/r., Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA

567.

EPIPHYSEAL BONE CHANGES FOLLOWING SURGICAL INDUCTIN OF OSTEOARTHRlTlS I N RATS. S. Stevenson, D. Zart, X. Li, D. Kimmel, N. Lane, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

568.

SYSTEMIC DELIVERY OF TGFP PRODUCES A MARKED INCREASE IN OSTEOBLASTS, STIMULATES OSTEOID SYNTHESIS A N D INCREASES BONE FORMATION I N LONG BONESAND VERTEBRAE I N RATSAND MICE. M. Mathews, R. Armstrong, E. deLeon, H. Bentz, L. Fiedler,). Carlino, S. Seyedin, C. Mathews, 5. Miller, D. Rosen, Collagen Corporation, Palo Alto, CA, University of California, Davis, CA, and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

569.

B, RECEPTORS MEDIATE BRADYKlNlN EFFECTS ON OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. D. Tatakis, C. Dolce, R. Dziak, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY

570.

INWARD RECTIFYING K+ A N D VOLTAGE ACTIVATED Na+ CURRENTS IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. C. Dolce, 5. Simasko, R. Dziak, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY

571.

TETRACYCLINE ALTERS THE REGULATION OF CYTOPLASMIC CALCIUM I O N IN RAT OSTEOCLASTS. H . Donahue, K. lijima, M. Coligorsky, C. Rubin, B. Riikin, SUNY, Stony Brook and NYU, New York, NY 4 5 1-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

572.

LOW FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS MODULATE CALCIUM SPIKING IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. K. Mcleod, H . Donahue, C. Rubin, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY

573.

TEMPORAL NATURE OF OSTEOCLAST RESORPTION I N RESPONSE TO DISUSE. 5. Bain, C. Rubin, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY

574.

KEY FACTORS ENSURE QUALITATIVE A N D QUANTITATIVE CONSISTENCY OF RAPID MINERALIZATION BY CULTURED BOVINE BONE CELLS. 5. Whitson, M. Falk, 6. Tyree, Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, MD

575.

ACID PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IS DETECTED EXCLUSIVELY IN THE OSTEOCLASTIC CELL LINEAGE BY PRE-TREATMENT WITH CYANURIC CHLORIDE. Y. Nakamura, A. Yamaguchi, T. Ikeda, 5. Yoshiki, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan

576.

ETHANOL AUGMENTS CYCLIC AMP RESPONSE TO PARATHYROID HORMONE AND IMPAIRS PROLIFERATION OF RAT OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. R. Klein, H . Li, E. Orwoll, Portland VA Medical Center and Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR

577.

ESTROGEN REGULATION OF COLLAGEN GENE EXPRESSION IN UMR-106-01 OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS. 6. Vorderstrasse, K. Wiren, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, and University of Washington, Seattle, WA

578.

OSTEOBLAST-DERIVED IGF-BINDING PROTEINS ENHANCE IGF-STIMULATED MITOGENESIS IN MOUSE OSTEOBLASTS. D. Andress, R. Birnbaum, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, and University of Washington, Seattle, W A

579.

IDENTIFICATION OF LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT MITOGENIC PEPTIDES IN EXTRACTS OF NEONATAL MOUSE CALVARIA. R. Birnbaum, D. Andress, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, and University of Washington, Seattle, W A

580.

ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CLONAL POPULATIONS OF OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS FROM NEONATAL RAT CALVARIA. R. Drivdahl, C. Richardson, C. Howard, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, W A

581.

DYNAMIC CELL-CELL COMMUNICATION IN OSTEOBLASTS DEMONSTRATED BY LASER CYTOMETRY. 1. Binderman, V. Aviv, N. Melamed, N . Schlesinger, R. Rahamimoff, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv and The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel

582.

SEX SPECIFIC RESPONSE OF BONE CELLS TO SEX STEROIDS IN VITRO A N D ITS MODIFICATION BY PRENATAL ANDROGENIZATION. Y. Weisman, N. laccard, T. Hefferan, P. Cehron-Robey, F. Cassorla, A. Kaye, D. Somjen, lchilov Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel, NIH, Bethesda, MD, and the Weizman Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

583.

EFFECTS OF NICOTINE ON CELLULAR FUNCTION IN UMR 106-01 RAT OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. P. Frost, M. Fang, T. Hahn, Wadsworth VA Medical Center and UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

584.

DOES PARATHYROID HORMONE STIMULATE K+ CHANNEL ACTIVITY IN UMR106-01 CELLS? A. lida-Klein, T. Hahn, Wadsworth VA Medical Center and UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

585.

CALCITONIN STIMULATES CAMP AND CALCIUM SECOND MESSENGERS AND REVERSES PTH SUPPRESSION OF DNA SYNTHESIS IN UMR-106-06OSTEOBLASTLIKE CELLS. A. lida-Klein, A. Yee, Wadsworth VA MedicalCenter and UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA

586.

CELLULAR INTERACTIONS IN THE MARROW STROMA: ADIPOCYTES ARE MODULATING GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION OF OSTEOBLASTS IN CULTURE. D. Benayahu, D. Zipori, S. Wientroub, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, and Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

587.

IN VITRO HUMAN BONE CELL METABOLISM: COORDINATED VECTORAL SECRETION OF MATRIX PROTEINS. N. Fedarko, 8. Heywood, P. Cehron-Robey, National Institutes of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

588.

IN VITRO HUMAN BONE CELL METABOLISM: INFLUENCE OF THREE DIMENSIONAL ARCHITECTURE. N . Fedarko, P. Bianco, U. Vetter, P. Cehron-Robey, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

589.

(Y-MELANOCYTE-STIMULATINGHORMONE DOES NOT POSSESS ANTAGONIST ACTIVITIES IN THE REGULATION OF OSTEOBLAST ACTIVITY INDUCED BY INTERLEUKIN-1. D.Evans, M. Jhavarajah, 1. Kanis, University of Sheffield Medical School, Sheffield, UK

590.

LEUKOTRIENES MEDIATE BONE RESORPTION INDUCED BY INTERLEUKIN-1 IN FETAL RAT LONG BONES. P. Poubelle, D. Harbour, 1. Ross;, CHUL, Quebec, Canada, and C.R.L.C., Montpellier, France

591.

EFFECT OF ESTRADIOL ON NORMAL ADULT HUMAN BONE CELLS IN VITRO. 7. Hefferan, C. McQuillan, M. Young, P. Cehron-Robey, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

592.

REGULATION OF pHi IN HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE SaOS-2 CELLS. C. Graham, A. Tashjian, /r., Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

593.

A RISE IN [Ca2+Ii IS A PREREQUISITE FOR THROMBIN-INDUCED MODULATION OF pHi IN HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKESaOS-2 CELLS. E. Ofori-Darko, C. Graham, A. Jashjian, /r., Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

594.

INORGANIC PHOSPHATE INHIBITS OSTEOCLAST FORMATION AND THE ACTIVITY OF MATURE OSTEOCLASTS.A. Yates, R. Oreffo, K. Mayor, C. Mundy, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

595.

A NEW IN VlVO MODEL FOR STUDYING DE NOVO OSTEOCLASTOGENESIS:THE POST-NATALMOUSE CAUDAL VERTEBRAE. M. Cecchini, M. Castagna, R. Schenk, H. Fleisch, University of Berne, Switzerland

596.

PRODUCTION AND CHARACTERISATION OF ELEVEN HUMAN OSTEOCLASTSELECTIVE MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES. 1. /ames, S. Walsh, R. Dodds, M. Cowen, Bath Institutefor Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, Avon, UK

-s53-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

597.

PGE2 INDUCES DIFFERENTIATION OF OSTEOBLASTS I N CULTURE. E. Berger, S. Yahav, N. fine, Z. Shimshoni, 1. Binderman, lchilov Hospital, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

598.

A NOVEL MODEL SYSTEM FOR THE STUDY OF H U M A N BONE TURNOVER. R. Dodds, 1. lames, S. Walsh, M. Cowen, Bath Institute for Rheumatic Diseases, Bath, UK

599.

EFFECT OF FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR ON BETAGLYCAN IN OSTEOBLASTENRICHED AND OSTEOBLAST LIKE CELLS. M. Noda, 1. Andres, D. DeFalcis, j . Massague, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Labs., West Point, PA, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

600.

OSTEOBLAST CONDITIONED MEDIUM STIMULATES RESORPTION BY MAINTAIN ING VIABILITY OF MULTl N UCLEATING OSTEOCLAST PRECURSORS. E. Greenfield, 1. Alvarez, M. Oursler, E. McLaurine, H. Blair, 1. leffrey, N. Partridge, P. Osdoby, F. Ross, S. Teitelbaurn, Jewish Hospital, Washington University, and St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO

601.

WITH DRAWN

602.

REGULATION OF ORNlTHlNE DECARBOXYLASE ANTIZYME ACTIVITY BY PTH IN UMR-106 CELLS. 5. Cheng, A. Fausto, 1. Avioli, The Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, MO

603.

DISSOCIATION OF SECOND MESSENGERS ACTIVATION BY PTH FRAGMENTS IN OSTEOSARCOMACELLS.A. fujimori, S. Cheng, I. Avioli, R. Civitelli, JewishHospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

604.

THE HETEROGENEOUS [Ca2'], RESPONSE TO HORMONAL STIMULATION CORRELATES WITH RECEPTOR DISTRIBUTION ON OSTEOBLASTIC CELLS. R. Civitelli, A. fujimori, L. Avioli, 0. Coltzman, K. Hruska, Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO, and McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

605.

DIFFERENTIAL HYBRIDISATION SCREENING REVEALS THAT FERRlTlN LIGHT CHAIN IS A MAJOR PRODUCT OF THE ROS 17/2.8 OSTEOSARCOMA CELL. H. Siggelkow, 6. Lanske, R. Hesch, M . Atkinson, GSF Munchen and Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, West Germany

606.

PROTEIN KINASE C ACTIVATION MIGHT PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE I N STIMULATING CELL PROLIFERATION AND FUNCTION IN A CLONAL OSTEOBLASTIC CELL LINE MC3T3-El. Y. Yarnamoto, H. Yamada, M. fukase, T. fujita, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan

607.

OSTEOBLAST GROWTH AND DIFFERENTIATION ON COLLAGEN SUBSTRATA. 1. Masi, A. franchi, A. Janini, f . franceschelli, S. Benvenuti, f . Beghe, M. Brandi, Florence University School of Medicine, Firenze and Gentili Institute, Pisa, Italy

608.

IPRIFLAVONE MODULATES OSTEOBLAST CELL FUNCTION A N D GROWTH. S. Benvenuti, A. Tanini, 1. Masi, U . Frediani, I.Bufalino, M. Brandi, Florence University School of Medicine, Firenze and Chiesi Farmaceutici, Parrna, Italy

454-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

609.

RECEPTORS FOR INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-I IN BONE ENDOTHELIAL CELLS. C. Fiorelli, C. Orlando, E. Streeten, A. Tanini, S. Benvenuti, F. Bartucci, M. Brand;, Florence University School of Medicine, Firenze, LPB Institute, Milan, Italy, and National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

610.

DIFFERENTIAL STIMULATION OF FOS AND JUN FAMILY MEMBERS BY CALClTRlOL IN OSTEOBLASTIC MC3T3-El CELLS. R. St-Amaud, 1. Prud’homme, Shriners Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Canada

611.

OSTEOCALCIN STIMULATES OSTEOCLAST DEVELOPMENT IN VITRO. N. Kandemir, 1. Malone, A. Kahn, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO, and University of California, San Francisco, CA

61 2.

A SEGMENTAL CANINE SPINAL FUSION MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF BONE GRAFTING MATERIALS. C. Muschler, D. Caisser, A. Burstein, 1. Otis, 1. Lane, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, and Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY

61 3.

MOLECULAR CLONING OF OIF. 0. Rosen, P. Segarini, 1. Dasch, A. Thompson, 1. Ziman, H. Bentz, L. Madisen, H. Neubauer, G. Plowman, T . Purchio, Collagen Corporation, Palo Alto, CA, and Oncogen, Seattle, WA

614.

INDUCTION OF CHONDROGENIC PROPERTIES DURING PROLONGED CULTURE OF AN OSSEOUS CELL LINE IN VITRO. 5. Bernier, 1. Desjardins, D. Coltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

61 5.

DEMONSTRATION, BY IN VlVO RADIOAUTOGRAPHY, OF A NEW DISTINCT TARGETCELL FOR PARATHYROID HORMONE I N THE EPIPHYSEAL PLATE OF RAT LONG BONES. M. Rouleau, 1. Mitchell, 0. Goltzman, McGiII University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

61 6.

INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTORS BUT NOT INSULIN SELECTIVELY STIMULATE NA-DEPENDENT Pi TRANSPORT ACTIVITY IN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS. 1. Caverzasio, 1. Bonjour, University Hospital, Geneve, Switzerland

61 7.

PHOSPHOGLYCERATE KINASE IS EXPRESSED I N ROS 17/2.8 CELLS AND IS REGULATED BY INTERLEUKIN 1. B. Lanske, R. Hesch, M. Atkinson, GSF Munchen and Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, West Germany

61 8.

METHYLTHIOADENOSINE METABOLISM AND BONE NODULE FORMATION IN FETAL RAT CALVARIA CELLS. H. Ishida, 5. Kasahara, 5. Nishikawa, H . li, 5. Suzuki, S. Yamauchi, N. Kohda, Y. Wakano, H. Inoue, Tokushima University, Tokushima, Japan

61 9.

THE EFFECTOF TRllODOTHYRONlNE O N CELL GROWTH A N D ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY OF ISOLATED RAT CALVARIA CELLS. K. Oishi, H. Ishida, S. Nishikawa, A. Hamasaki, Y. Wakano, Tokushima University, Tokushima, Japan

620.

THE EFFECTS OF NEW PROSTAGLANDIN F2a ANALOGUE ON CELL GROWTH AND COLLAGEN SYNTHESIS IN AN OSTEOBLASTIC CELL CLONE (MC3T3-El). H. Yamada, M. Fukase, Y. Yamamoto, T. Fujita, Kobe University School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan

455-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

621.

AMYLIN-AMIDE COMPETES WITH CGRP BINDING SITES ON OSTEOBLAST-LIKE OSTEOSARCOMA CELLS. H. Datta, P. Rafter, S. Ohri, 1. Maclntyre, S. Wimalawansa, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London, UK

622.

WITH DRAWN

623.

MATRIX SYNTHESIS IS PREFERENTIALLY STIMULATED BY INSULIN A N D TGF-B DURING IN VITRO FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR. I.€.Russell, P. Manske, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

624.

EFFECT OF EXERCISE AND ESTRADIOL REPLACEMENT ON FEMORAL BONE TURNOVER IN THE OVARIECTOMIZED RAT. 1. Yeh, C. liu, I. Aloia, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, and University of Washington, Seattle, W A

625.

PRE-TREATMENT STERILIZATION OF CADAVER BONE PRIOR T O DEMINERALIZATION MAINTAINS OSTEOINDUCTIVE PROPERTIES. A. Prewett, R. O’leary, C. Damien, 1. Parsons, Osteotech, Shrewsbury, and University of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark, NJ

626.

PROSTAGLANDINS IN SYNOVtAL OSTEOCHONDROMATOSIS. D. Pechman, P. Wong, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY

627.

AMPLIFICATION OF TYPE I1COLLAGEN mRNA FROMCHONDROCYTES GROWN IN SUSPENSION CULTURE. 0. Redford, M. McKinstry, 0. Rowe, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

628.

ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY IN MATRIX VESICLES DERIVED FROM RACHlTlC AND NORMAL RATS. 0. Stechschulte, If., 0. Morris, H. Hsu, 1. David, P. Moylan, H. Anderson, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS

629.

IMMUNOCHEMICAL AND IMMUNOCYTOCHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION OF MATRIX VESICLE PROTEINS. D. Morris, P. Moylan, D. Levine, D. Stechschulte, jr., H. Anderson, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS

630.

GENE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BIGLYCAN. 1. Fisher, A. Heegaard, 1. Termine, M. Young, NIDR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

631.

PURIFICATION AND COMPLETE AMINO ACID SEQUENCE OF BONE GLA PROTEIN FROMCANINE BONE. C. Colombo, P. Fanti, C. Yao, H. Malluche, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

$632.

DIFFERENTIAL BONE MATRIX GENE EXPRESSION IN A NOVEL MINERALIZING CELL CULTURE SYSTEM. K. Ibaraki, 1. Termine, M. Young, S. Whitson, NIDR, National Institutes of Health, and Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD

633.

CELL ATTACHMENT PROPERTIES OF NONDENATURED RAT BONE SIALOPROTEIN. K. Mintz, R. Midura, P. Cehron-Robey, 1. Termine, 1. Fisher, NIDR, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

634.

ELABORATION OF MATRIX DEGRADING ENZYMES FROM OSTEOBLASTS IS INFLUENCED BY STATE OF DIFFERENTIATION. 1.Rifas, 1.Avioli, H. Welgus, Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO 456-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

635.

BONE REMODELING FOLLOWING A COLLE’S FRACTURE: ASSESSMENT BY COMPTON DENSITOMETRY. 1. Leichter, B. Bloch, 1. Margulies, R. Waksman, The Jerusalem Osteoporosis Center, Jerusalem, Israel

636.

MEASUREMENT OF THE MINERAL CONTENT OF CANCELLOUS BONE MATRIX IN NORMAL AND OSTEOPOROTIC WOMEN USING A N INTEGRATED HISTOMORPHOMETRIC AND ABSORPTIOMETRIC TECHNIQUE. S. Hodgson, H. Wahner, W. Dunn, M . Bateman, S.Hughes, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, MN

637.

RADIOIMMUNOASSAY OF C-PROPEPTIDE OF TYPE II COLLAGEN IN HUMAN SERUM. D. Carey, M. Alini, F. Piccolo, L. Rosenberg, I . Hyams, ). Rowe, A. Poole, Shriners Hospital/McGilI University, Montreal, Canada, Hartford Hospital, Hartford, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY

638.

SODIUM-DEPENDENT PHOSPHATE TRANSPORT SYSTEM IN MATRIX VESICLES: CHARACTERIZATION AND RELATIONSHIP WITH MINERALIZING ACTIVITY, C. Montessuit, 1. Caverzasio, 1. Bonjour, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

639.

RUTHENIUM HEXAMINE TRICHLORIDE FIXATION FOR EXAMINATION OF ILIAC BONE BIOPSIES. C. Mase, C. Sudy, Biomechanics, Trauma & Sports Medicine Laboratory, Ann Arbor, M I

640.

THE RATIONAL DESIGN OF NEW BISPHOSPHONATES. Y. Isomura, M . Takeuchi, K. Kawamuki, M. Kudo, 1.Abe, S. Fujita, H. Kawashima, M. Murase, Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Japan

641.

BONE HISTOMORPHOMETRICS EFFECTS OF LOW PROTEIN DIET A N D KETOACID SUPPLEMENTATION OF RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY. M. Lafage, M. Aparicio, 1. Dehais, CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux, France

642.

INVOLVEMENT OF IL-6 IN MODULATION OF OSTEOCLASTIC RESORPTION BY BISPHOSPHONATES. C. van der Pluijm, E. van Beek, C. Lowik, S. Papapoulos, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

643.

THE B6C3H BACKGROUND AMELIORATES THE BONE DISEASE IN X-LINKED HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC MICE. R. Meyer, Ir., M. Meyer, R. Cray, Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, W I

644.

REGIONAL BONE MINERAL CONTENT A N D BONE METABOLISM DURING AND AFTER VERY LOW CALORIE DIET. Y. Nishizawa, H. Koyama, T. Shoji, S. Hagiwara, H. Aratani, 1.Miki, H. Morii, Osaka City University Medical School, Osaka, Japan

645.

TWO-SITE IMMUNORADIOMETRIC ASSAY FOR CIRCULATING BONE GLA-PROTElN IN END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE. K. Nakatsuka, 1.Miki, Y. Nishizawa, K. Iba, H. Morii, Osaka City University, Osaka, Japan

646.

A TWO-SITE IMMUNORADIOMETRIC ASSAY SPECIFIC FOR H U M A N BONE ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE CORRELATES WITH OTHER INDICES OF OSTEOBLAST FUNCTION. L. Deftos, M. Weisman, C. Hill, University of California, San Diego, San Diego VA Medical Center, and Hybritech Incorporated, San Diego, CA

657-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

647.

THE USE OF DUAL X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY IN INFANTS. C. Chan, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

648.

IV DOSING STUDY IN PATIENTS WITH PAGET’S DISEASE USING CGP-23339A. N. Kelepouris, 1. Haddad, Ir., K. Zelenakas, E. Siris, T . lacobs, C. VandePol, R. Altman, W. Ryan, A. Chausmer, F. Shai, K. Insogna, M. Whyte, Universities of Pennsylvania, Columbia, Miami, South Florida Yale, Rush Presbyterian/St. Lukes Medical Center, VA Medical Center, Brooklyn, Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Ciba-Geigy Pharmaceuticals, Summit, NJ

649.

LUMBAR BONE MINERAL CONTENT IN LONG-TERM USE OF THlAZlDE DIURETICS FOR RECURRENT UROLlTHlASlS WITH IDIOPATHIC HYPERCALCIURIA. f . Liote, 6. Naveau, P. Houillier, D. Roche, 0.Mundler, P. jungers, D. Kuntz, Hopital Lariboisiere and Hopital Necker, Paris, France

650.

TETRACYCLINE TREATMENT NORMALIZES BONE A N D CARTILAGE MORPHOLOGY IN DIABETIC RATS. S. Bain, N. Ramamurthy, L. Colub, C. Rubin, S.U.N.Y., Stony Brook, NY

651.

AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT OSTEOPOROSIS TYPE I. 1. Bollerslev, T. Steiniche, P. Andersen, L. Mosekilde, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark

652.

TURNERSYNDROME: EVALUATION OFTHE BONE MINERAL CONTENT DURING GROWTH. S. Mora, C. Weber, P. Calliua, C. Nizzoli, C. Chiumello, University of Milan, H San Raffaele, Milan, Italy

653.

HIGH DOSE IV PAMIDRONATE IN THE TREATMENT OF RESISTANT PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE. P. Richardson, 1. Cantrill, D. Anderson, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Salford, UK’

654.

BREAST CANCER: STIMULATORY AND INHIBITORY EFFECTS ON BONE CELLS IN CULTURE. I. Braidman, C. Evans, C. Ward, D. Anderson, C. Calasko, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, UK

655.

ELEVATION OF PARATHYROID HORMONE IN INCIPIENT RENAL FAILURE: A COMPENSATORY MECHANISM TO OFFSET DECREASED 1,25 VIT D LEVELS. M. Faugere, R. Friedler, P. Fanti, H. Malluche, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

656.

ALUMINUM EXERTS A BlPHASlC EFFECT O N BONE GLA PROTEIN IN 1,25D STIMULATED RAT SARCOMA CELLS IN CULTURE. P. Fanti, S. Mohapatra, 1. Klein, M. Kindy, C. Colombo, H . Malluche, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

657.

BONE DENSITY IN TYPE I DIABETIC CHILDREN. S. Mora, T. Roe, C. Costin, V . Cilsanz, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

658.

BONE HISTOMORPHOMETRY O F ETHANOL-FED RATS. C. Liu, T . Peng, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

659.

PREEXISTING BONE LOSS ASSOCIATED WITH OVARIECTOMY IS REVERSED BY PARATHYROID HORMONE. C. Liu, D. Kalu, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, University of Seattle, WA, and University of Texas, San Antonio, TX

458-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

660.

CREATINE KINASE ACTIVITY IS ELEVATED I N THE SERUM OF SELECT CASES OF OSTEOPETROSIS, BUT NOT IN OTHER SCLEROSING BONE DISORDERS. M. Whyte, D. Silva, 1. Ladenson, Shriners Hospital and Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, MO

661.

A DOUBLE-BLIND, PLACEBO CONTROLLED, RISING MULTIPLE DOSE TRIAL OF ORAL ALENDRONATE IN PAGET’S DISEASE. A. Burssens, B. Certz, R. Francis, 1. Tucci, F.R. Singer, University Hospital, Belgium, Merck and Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, Newcastle General Hospital, UK, Brown University Providence, RI, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

662.

SHORT-TERM IMMUNOLOGICAL AND METABOLIC RESPONSES TO TREATMENTS AND RE-TREATMENTS WITH THREE DIFFERENT NITROGEN-CONTAlNlNG BISPHOSPHONATES IN PAGET’S DISEASE. S. Papapoulos, K. Hoekrnan, M. Naafs, A. Voets, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

663.

OSTEOMALACIA AND SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. A. Borelli, P. Correa, V. lorgetti, M. Souza, M. Crivelari, M. Ceccantini, A. Bracco, M. Leite, University S. Paulo, S. Paulo, Brazil

664.

DYNAMIC BONE HISTOMORPHOMETRY IN HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. M. Leite, P. Correa, V. lorgetti, 1. Batalha, R. Pereira, 1. Mechica, A. Borelli, University S. Paulo, S. Paulo, Brazil

665.

EFFICACY OF APD FOR RECURRENCES OF TUMOR-ASSOCIATED HYPERCALCEMIA. 1. Body, 1. Durnon, A. Magritte, V. Steppe, lnstitut J. Bordet, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

666.

URINARY HYDROXY-PYRIDINIUM CROSSLINKS OF COLLAGEN AS INDICES OF BONE RESORPTION IN PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. M. Seibel, F. Cartenberg, S. Silverberg, A. Ratcliffe, 5. Robins, 1. Bilezikian, College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY, and Rowett Res. Institute, Aberdeen, UK

667.

PTHRP LEVELS IN PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. S. Silverberg, W. Burtis, F. Gartenberg, 1. Bilezikian, College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY, and West Haven VA Medical Center, West Haven, CT

668.

METABOLIC AND RADIOGRAPHIC RESPONSES TO INTRAVENOUS PAMIDRONATE IN PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE. H . Bone, D. Cody, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

669.

HIGHER SERUM CALCIUM IN VLBW INFANTS ON CHRONIC COMBINED DIURETIC THERAPY. S. Reddy, N. Adarns, D. Carey, 6. Hollis, M. Holman, 1. Rowe, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT, and University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

670.

CLODRONATE DECREASES THE INCIDENCE OF HYPERCALCAEMIA A N D MAJOR VERTEBRAL FRACTURES IN METASTATIC BREAST CANCER. E. McCloskey, A. Paterson, T. Powles, 1. Kanis, University Medical School, Sheffield, UK

671.

VITAMIN D METABOLITE CONCENTRATIONS IN PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. R. Vieth, T. Bayley, A. Pollard, P. Walfish, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

459-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

672.

SPINE BONE DENSITY IN HYPERCALCIURIC STONE-FORMERS. C. Rodriguez, F. Spivacow, C. Bogado, 1. Zanchetta, lnstituto de lnvestigaciones Metabolicas, Buenos Aires, Argentina

673.

THE ROLE OF ANDROGENS IN BONE MASS A N D BONE LOSS. C. Slemenda, 5. Hui, C. Longcope, C. johnston, jr., Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN

674.

ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS AND BONE DENSITY: THE TREATMENT OF MILD HYPERTENSION STUDY. K. Ensrud, 5. Mascioli, C. Launer, R. Crimm, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

675.

BONE TRABECULAR ARCHITECTURE CAN BE IMAGED WITH HIGH-FIELD NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MICROSCOPY. F. Wehrli, 5. Wehrli, 1. Williams, M. Attie, H. Kressel, University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA

676.

WITH DRAWN

677.

EFFECT OF ESTROGEN, PROGESTERONE A N D TAMOXIFEN ON BONE: A COMPARATIVE STUDY IN THE OVARIECTOMIZED RAT MODEL. D. Kalu, E. Salerno, R. €chon, M. Ray, 6. Hollis, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, and University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

678.

EFFECTIVE TRANSVERSE SPIN RELAXATION TIME: A NEW PARAMETER FOR IN-VIVO ASSESSMENT OF TRABECULAR BONE MICROSTRUCTURE. F. Wehrli, j . Ford, M. Attie, H. Kressel, C. Watson, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

679.

DIETARY CALCIUM AND BONE MASS CHANGES I N LATE ELDERLY CAUCASIAN WOMEN. j . Reed, j . Anderson, F. Tylavsky, C. Lester, R. lalmage, j . Ezzell, 1. laft, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

680.

EFFECT OF NUTRITIONAL FACTORS A N D CALCIUM REGULATING HORMONES ON BONE LOSS IN PERIMENOPAUSALWOMEN. B. Lukert, M. Stoskopf, 1. Higgins, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS

681.

EFFECT OF MENOPAUSE A N D ESTROGEN TREATMENT OF THE URINARY EXCRETION OF PYRlDlNlUM CROSSLINKS. D. Eubelhart, A. Schlemmer, j . johansen, E. Cineyts, C. Christiansen, P. Delmas, INSERM U234, Lyon, France, and Glostrop Hospital, Glostrop, Denmark

682.

EFFECT OF TILUDRONATE O N BONE DENSITY IN THE RADIUS IN MONKEYS. P. Ceusens, j . Dequeker, j . Nijs, A. Barbier, F. Lacheretz, 6. Remandet, K. U. Leuven, U.Z. Pellenberg, Pellenberg, Belgium, and Sanofi Recherche, Montpellier, France

683.

OSTEONAL REMODELING AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF THE FEMORAL CORTEX IN RABBITS TREATED WITH 24R,25(OH),D3. 1. Nakamura, K. Suzuki, 5. Mishima, 7. Hirai, H. Orimo, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyusyu, Japan

684.

THE DIURNAL RHYTHM OF BONE RESORPTION IN THE RAT. R. Muhlbauer, H. Fleisch, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland

-S60-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

685.

EFFECT OF YM175 ON BONE POSITIVELY CORRELATES WITH ITS CONCENTRATION IN BONE. K. Kawamuki, T . Abe, M . Kudo, N. O’uchi, H . Motoie, T. Usui, Y. /somura, M. Takeuchi, H. Kawashima, Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Tsukuba, Japan

686.

DEMONSTRATION THAT BONE MASS IS INCREASED IN BLACK PREPUBERTAL AND EARLY PUBERTAL CHILDREN. N . Bell,). Shary,). Stevens, M. Carza, L. Cordon, 1. Edwards, VA Medical Center and Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

687.

BONE MINERAL DENSITIES AND METABOLIC PARAMETERS IN WOMEN WITH EATING DISORDERS. K. Carmichael, St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO

688.

COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF PROGESTERONE, ESTROGEN AND MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ON ESTABLISHED BONE LOSS IN OVARIECTOMIZED AGED RATS. E. Barengolts, T. Rosol, 1. Botsis, S . Kukreja, VA West Side Medical Center, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, and Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

689.

THE EFFECTS OF PHYSIOLOGIC LEVELS OF THYROID HORMONE ON TOTAL BODY CALCIUM. A. Vaswani, /. Aloia, D. McCowen, F. Dilmanian, WinthropUniversity Hospital, Mineola, and Brookhaven Hospital, Upton, NY

690.

HUMAN MODEL OF DISUSE OSTEOPENIA: EFFECTS OF TYPE, AMOUNT, AND REGION OF PHYSICAL DISABILITY. B. Kiratli, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

691.

ANTIGENIC PROFILES OF BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES RELATE TO BONE TURNOVER MARKERS IN OSTEOPOROSIS. M. Peacock, F. Hustmyer, E. Walker, L. Benninger, C. Cirasole, X. Yu, S. Manolagas, Indiana University and VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN

692.

FOREARM BONE MEASUREMENTS USING A DEXA INSTRUMENT. R. Nord, T. Sanchez, Norland Corporation, Ft. Atkinson, WI

693.

CAN FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION CYCLE ERGOMETRY REVERSE DISUSE OSTEOPENIA IN CHRONIC SPINAL CORD INJURY?S. Bloomfield, R. lackson, 1. Mysiw, S. Hannum, V. Yost, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

694.

PLACEMENT OF POINTS FOR DIGITIZING SPINE FILMS. N. Spencer, P. Steiger, S. Curnmings, H. Cenant, University of California, San Francisco, CA

695.

LACK OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FITNESS VARIABLES AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN. A. Friedlander, 1. Block, H. Cenant, University of California, San Francisco, CA

696.

SHOULD REFERENCEVALUES OF BMC BE REASSESSEDANNUALLY?S. Rozenberg, H. Ham, A. Peretz, 1. Praet, C. Robyn, Free University of Brussels, and St. Peter’s Hospital, Brussels, Belgium

697.

BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN NORMAL MEN AND WOMEN: THE EFFECT OF AGE AT DIFFERENT BONE SITES. C. Plato, T . Roy, S . Sherman, 1. Tobin, NIA, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

698.

HOMEOSTATIC CONTROL OF BONE STRUCTURE. C. Turner, Creighton University, Omaha, NE

699.

THE EFFECT OF CIGARETTE SMOKING ON TRABECULAR BONE DENSITY IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN, AGED 25-35 YEARS. S. Whiting, R. McCulloch, D. Bailey, C. Houston, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada

700.

LONGITUDINAL PRECISION OF DUAL ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY IN A MULTICENTERTRIAL. E. Orwoll, S. Oviatt, Portland VA Medical Center, and Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR

701.

ANABOLIC EFFECT OF HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE (1-34) IN OVARIECTOMIZED MICE. C. Liu, American Lake VA Medical Center, Tacoma, and University of Washington, Seattle, WA

702.

BONE MINERAL DENSITY REFERENCE DATABASES FOR AMERICAN MEN AND WOMEN. T. Kelly, Hologic, Inc., Waltharn, M A

703.

ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF NATURAL Ca AND Sr IN H U M A N SERUM AND THEIR USETO STUDY Ca ABSORPTION. V. Matkovic, T . lelic, N. Gerber, K. Foland, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

704.

A DIFFERENCE IN CALCIUM METABOLISM BETWEEN CHILDHOOD A N D ADOLESCENCE. V. Matkovic, T. lelic, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

705.

DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF DUAL ENERGY RADIOGRAPHY MEASUREMENTS AT THE LUMBAR SPINE AND PROXIMAL FEMUR. M. Griffin, R. Rupich, R. Civitelli, R. Pacifici, L. Avioli, Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

706.

DUAL ENERGY RADIOGRAPHY REVEALS N O EFFECT OF ESTROGEN THERAPY ON BONE MASS IN WOMEN MORE THAN 10 YEARS POSTMENOPAUSAL. R. Rupich, R. Civitelli, M. Griffin, L. Avioli, Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

707.

BONE DENSITY AND VERTEBRAL HEIGHT IN TREATED POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROTIC WOMEN. D. Villareal, D. Maggio, R. Rupich, R. Civitelli, R. Pacifici, M. Griffin, L. Avioli, Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO

708.

BONE MASS ACCUMULATION DURING ADOLESCENCE: MARKED DIFFERENCE ACCORDING TO SEX AND SKELETAL SITES. 1. Bonjour, G. Theintz, 6 . Buchs, D. Slosrnan, H. Clavien, P. Hazegui, R. Rizzoli, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

709.

TREATMENT OF INVOLUTIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS WITH THE BISPHOSPHONATE APD: NONLINEAR INCREASE OF LUMBAR BONE MINERAL DENSITY. 1. Devogelaer, C. Nagant, Louvain University, and St-Luc University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium

710.

COMPARISON OF THE BlOAVAlLABlLlTY OF THE NaF CAPSULES USED IN THE NIH-SPONSORED TRIALS AS COMPARED TO THAT OF NaF ENTERIC-COATED TABLETS COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE IN EUROPE. C. Nagant, 1. Devogelaer, F. Stein, Louvain University and St-Luc University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium -S62-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

71 1 .

A RANDOMIZED, CONTROLLED TRIAL OF APD GIVEN INTRAVENOUSLY WITH AND WITHOUT SODIUM FLUORIDE IN INVOLUTIONAL OSTEOPOROSIS. 1. Devogelaer, W. Esselinckx, C. Nagant, Louvain University and St-Luc University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium

71 2.

SPONTANEOUS BONE DENSITOMETRY CHANGES AMONG SHEEHANS PATIENTS WITH TIME: CORRELATION WITH CLINICAL/MORPHOMETRIC AND BIOCHEMICAL/HORMONAL PARAMETERS. F. Aguilo, N. Mejias, V. Ortiz, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR

71 3 .

BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL AND TROCHANTERIC FRACTURES OF THE PROXIMAL FEMUR. E. Vega, C. Mautalen, G. Fromm, Hospital de Clinicas and Centro de Osteopatias, Buenos Aires, Argentina

71 4.

GROWTH HORMONE AND PARATHYROID HORMONE SECRETION IN EARLY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN BEFORE AND AFTER 6 MONTHS OF ESTRADIOL REPLACEMENT THERAPY. C. Kayser, H. Harms, R. Horn, U . Kapteina, E. Rittinghaus, R. Hesch, Abt. Klin. Endokrinologie, Med. Hochschule, Hannover, West Germany

71 5.

EFFECT OF rhGH ALONE OR IN COMBINATION WITH ESTROGEN ON BONE ACCRETION IN TURNER’S SYNDROME. K. Rubin, V. Schirduan, D. Kennedy, 1. Smith, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

71 6.

COMPARISON OF BONE MASS IN THE AXIAL AND PERIPHERAL SKELETON USING DEXA AND COMPTON DENSITOMETRY. 1. Menczel, R. Steinberg, R. Waksman, 1. Foldes, 1. Leichter, The Jerusalem Osteoporosis Center, Jerusalem, Israel

71 7.

COMPARISON OF METHODS TO QUANTITATE OSTEOPOROTIC VERTEBRAL DEFORMATION. 1. Raymakers, S. Duursma, University Hospital, Utrecht, The Netherlands

71 8.

PERIMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS: EVALUATION OF PATIENTS AT RISK. M. Dambacher, A. Muller, R. Cass, 1. Fischer, P. Ruegsegger, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

71 9.

SEMI-AUTOMATIC COMPUTER ASSISTED X-RAY MORPHOMETRY OF THE SPINE. 1. Nischelsky, H. Harms, M. Calanski, H. Hesch, Hochschule, Hannover, West Germany

720.

CHROMOGRANIN A-RELATED PEPTIDES AUTO-INHIBIT THE REGULATED, BUT NOT CONSTITUTIVE, PATHWAY OF PARATHYROID SECRETION. 6. Fasciotto, S. Gorr, 0 . Cohn, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY

721.

EFFECT OF HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE ON BONE IN SKELETALLY MATURE FEMALE RATS. C. lerome, Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland

722.

DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSITIVE AND DIRECT RADIOIMMUNOASSAY FOR PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN: IDENTIFICATION OF A MAJOR EPITOPE AND DETECTION OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN PLASMA AND MILK. 1. Duong, 1. Fisher, M. Chorev, C. Leu, M. Yamamoto, M. Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

663-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

723.

BIOTI NYLATED PARATHY ROID HORMONE A N D PARATHYROI D HORMONERELATED PEPTIDE ANALOGS AS PROBES FOR THE PTH RECEPTOR. E. Roubini, L. Duong, M. Chorev, M. Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA, and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

724.

SUBSTITUTION OF LEU-1 1 A N D D-TRP-12 INTO PARATHYROID HORMONERELATED PROTEIN CONVERTS THE 1-34 PEPTIDE FROM FULL AGONIST T O A N ANTAGONIST. R. McKee, 5. Gibbons, 1. levy, M. Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

725.

CYCLIC ANTAGONIST ANALOGS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE. M. Chorev, €. Roubini, R. McKee, 5. Gibbons, M. Goldrnan, M . Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

726.

CALCIUM REGULATED SECRETION A N D CHARACTERISTICS OF H U M A N PARATHYROID PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. D. Bansal, D. Hinton, R. MacCregor, University of Kansas, Kansas City, KS

727.

A NEW SENSITIVE HOMOLOGOUS RIA FORAMINO-TERMINAL PTH IN THE RAT. Martin, E. Slatopolsky, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

j . Finch, N. Rapp, K.

728.

COMPARATIVE BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF H U M A N PTH, RAT PTH, A N D H U M A N PTH-LIKE PEPTIDE IN ISOLATED PERFUSED BONE OF THE RAT. 5. Lopez-Hilker, K . Martin, T. Sugirnoto, E. Slatopolsky, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

729.

ALL MAJOR LUNG CANCER CELL TYPES PRODUCE PARATHYROID HORMONELIKE PROTEIN: HETEROGENEITY ASSESSED BY HPLC. D. Brandt, D. Burton, L. Deftos, University of California, San Diego, and San Diego VA Medical Center, La Jolla, CA

730.

CALCIUM STIMULATES PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PROTEIN SECRETION: POTENTIATION THROUGH A PROTEIN KINASE C PATHWAY. D. Brandt, 5. Pandol, L. Deftos, University of California, San Diego, and San Diego VA Medical Center, La Jolla, CA

731.

BENEFICIAL EFFECTS OF SPLENECTOMY ON THE HYPERCALCEMIA-LEUKOCYTOYS PARANEOPLASTIC SYNDROME ASSOCIATED WITH A H U M A N TUMOR. T. Yoneda, M. Alsina, G. Mundy, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX

732.

STRUCTURE A N D EXPRESSION OF THE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE GENE I N THE CHICKEN. j . Haddad, jr., 5. Rutledge, M. Thiede, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

733.

PARATHYROID HORMONE DEPOLARIZES OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS VIA ACTIVATION OF STRETCH ACTIVATED CATION CHANNELS. R. Duncan, K. Hruska, Jewish Hospital, Washington University, St. Lou is, MO

-S64-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

734.

PARATH Y ROID HORMONE-RE LATED PROTEIN CONCENTRATIONS IN RAT MILK: CHANGE WITH TIME OF LACTATION A N D I N RESPONSE T O EXTERNAL STIMULI. M. Yamamoto,). Fisher, M. Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, L. Duong, MerckSharp & Dohrne Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

735.

SYNTHETIC AMINO-TERMINAL FRAGMENTS OF H U M A N PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE DO N O T POSSESS TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA-LIKE ACTIVITY IN VITRO. H. Kikuchi, K. Lee, S. Ohta, K. Shiomi, T. Ikeda, T. Sone, 1. lonishi, C. Shigeno, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan

736.

CALCIPHYLAXIS: A LIFE THREATENING COMPLICATION OF PATIENTS WITH SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. Q. Duh, R. Lim, 0. Clark, VA Medical Center and University of California, San Francisco, CA

737.

AFF INITY-PU RIFIE D ANTI B O D IES T O PARATHY ROI D HORMONE-RE LATED PEPTIDE STAIN ALL LEVELS OF THE EPIDERMIS. €. Atillasoy, W. Burtis, L. Milstone, VA Medical Center, West Haven and Yale University, N e w Haven, CT

738.

SUCKLING-MEDIATED INCREASES IN URINARY PHOSPHATE A N D CAMP EXCRETION IN LACTATING RATS: SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF PARATHYROID HORMONERELATED PROTEIN? M. Yamamoto, I. Duong, ). Fisher, M. Thiede, M. Caulfield, M. Rosenblatt, Merck Sharp & Dohrne Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

739.

PTH A N D GROWTH HORMONE ARE BOTH NECESSARY T O INCREASE BONE MASS IN AGED RATS. 1. Hock, R. Wood, Tufts University, Boston, M A

740.

EXTRACELLULAR CALCIUM REGULATES DISTRIBUTION A N D SECRETION OF PROTEOGLYCANS I N A RAT PARATHYROID CELL LINE. Y. Takeuchi, K . Sakaguchi, M. Yanagishita, V. Hascall, NIDR, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

741.

H U M A N TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR ALPHA CAUSES MARKED HYPERCALCEMIA IN MICE A N D IS SYNERGETIC WITH LOW-DOSE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN. A. Yates, C. Marcelli, L. Bonewald, T. Aufdermorte, R. Walker, 6 . Langton, G. Mundy, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, and Triton Biosciences, Alarneda, CA

742.

EFFECTS OF GROWTH FACTORS ON PROLIFERATION OF BONE-DERIVED CELLS.

1. Chavez, M. Sabatini, G. Gutierrez, 1. Garrett, C. Mundy, University of Texas, San Antonio, TX 743.

CALCITONIN RECEPTORS ARE ALTERNATELY COUPLED BY G PROTEINS T O THE CAMP OR THE PROTEIN KINASE C PATHWAYS DURING THE CELL CYCLE IN A KIDNEY CELL-LINE. M. Chakraborty, D. Chatterjee, R. Baron, Yale University, New Haven, CT

744.

CALCITONIN ACTIVATION OF THE PROTEIN KINASE C PATHWAY INHIBITS BONE RESORPTION A N D INDUCES CELL RETRACTION IN ISOLATED RAT OSTEOCLASTS. Y. Su, M. Chakraborty, M. Nathanson, R. Baron, Yale University, N e w Haven, CT

745.

SYNTHETIC PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE (1-74) IS ANABOLIC FOR BONE IN VIVO. E. Weir, C. Terwilliger, I. Sartori, K. Insogna, Yale University, New Haven, CT

-S65-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

746.

TRAN SMEMB RANE SIG NALI N G PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY EXTRACELLULAR METAL CATIONS IN PARATHYROID CELLS: DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF PHORBOL MYRISTATE ACETATE A N D PERTUSSIS TOXIN. f. Racke, M. Meister, E. Nemeth, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

747.

THE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN IS A POTENT STIMULATOR OF PROSTAGLANDIN Ez RELEASE BY HUMAN OSTEOBLAST-LIKE CELLS A N D FETAL RAT LONG BONES: EFFECT OF PEPTIDE LENGTH. M. Mitnick, C. /sales, 1. Paliwal, K. Insogna, Yale University, New Haven, CT

748.

MOBILIZATION OF INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM A N D INHIBITION OF HORMONE SECRETION IN BOVINE PARATHYROID CELLS IN THE ABSENCE OF DETECTABLE INCREASES IN INOSITOL PHOSPHATES. F. Racke, D. MacDonald, E . Nemeth, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

749.

NOVEL REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF PARATHYROID CELL FUNCTION BY NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES. M. De Feo, M. Pines, S. Hurwitz, 0. Bartolini, C. Orlando, S. Benvenuti, A. Tanini, M. Brand;, Florence University, Florence, Italy, and Agricultural Research Organization, Bet-Dagan, Israel

750.

EFFECTS OF PTH AND 1 ,25(OH),D3 ON PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL I N PRIMARY CULTURES OF MOUSE KIDNEY TUBULES. E. Delvin, P. Richard, F. Clorieux, Shriners Hospital and McGill University, Montreal, Canada

751.

EFFECT OF CALCIUM AND 1,25(OH),D3 ON SYNTHESIS A N D SECRETION OF PARATHYROID CHROMOGRANIN IN A BOVINE PARATHYROID CELLS IN VITRO. A. Mouland, C. Hendy, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

752.

RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISMS AT THE H U M A N PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE GENE LOCUS. C. Hendy, C. Champigny, 1. Bolivar, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

753.

PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE EXPRESSION FROM A REPLICATION DEFECTIVE RETROVIRAL VECTOR. S. Kaiser, P. Laneuville, 1. Henderson, R. Kremer, D. Coltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada

754.

OSTEOBLASTSAN D STROMAL CELLS-PRODUCED CYTOKlNES INFLUENCE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN PRODUCTION BY LUNG SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA (BEN CELLS). R. Rizzoli, A. Sappino, 1. feyen, 1. Bonjour, University Hospital, Geneva, and Sandoz-Pharma, Basal, Switzerland

755.

STIMULATORS OF CAMP PRODUCTION INCREASE THE RELEASE OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN BY LUNG SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA (BEN CELLS). R. Rizzoli, A. Sappino, M. Aubert, 1. Bonjour, University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland

756.

INCREASED PULSE-AMPLITUDE AND -FREQUENCY OF PARATHYROID HORMONE SECRETION IN PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. H . Harms, E. Schlinke, R. Horn, C. Kayser, W . Kulpmann, R. Hesch, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, West Germany

-S66-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

757.

IMMUNOHISTOCHEM1CAL DEMONSTRATION OF PARATHY ROID HORMON ERELATED PROTEIN IN NORMAL HUMAN LUNG CANCER TISSUE. S. Kitazawa, M. Fukase, R. Kitazawa, T. Fujita, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

758.

TISSUE DISTRIBUTION OF VITAMIN D RECEPTOR mRNA IN MICE AND RATS AND ITS CONTROL DURING REPRODUCTION. T. Saunders, L. Opperman, 1. Corman, D. Bruns, M. Bruns, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

759.

CALBlNDlN DgK rnRNA AND VITAMIN D RECEPTOR mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE OSTEOSCLEROTIC MOUSE. M. Bruns, D. Bruns, M . Seifert, University of Virginia Medical School, Charlottesville, VA, and University of South Dakota School of Medicine, Vermillion, SD

760.

ADAPTATION OF CALBINDIN-DgKTOA LOWCALCIUM DIET DOES NOTOCCUR IN THE 14-WEEK-OLD SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS. D. Cloney, S. Burnett, M. Bruns, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

761.

THE CONTROL OF CALBINDIN-DgK AND CALBINDIN-D,,K IN MOUSE UTERUS BY 1,25(OH), D AND ESTROGEN. L. Opperman, T. Saunders, S. Mills, S. Christakos, D. Bruns, M. Bruns, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ

762.

EXPRESSION OF CALBlNDlN DgK, ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE, A N D VITAMIN D RECEPTOR mRNAs IN THE INTESTINES OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS. D. leetun, 1. Corman, S. Burnett, T. Saunders, M. Bruns, D. Bruns, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

763.

EFFECT OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D3 ON PRIMARY CHICK KIDNEY CELLS CULTURED UNDER TWO DIFFERENT GROWTH CONDITIONS. A. Maiyar, H . Henry, E. Luntao, A. Norman, University of California, Riverside, CA

764.

ACUTE EFFECT OF IGF-1 ON 1-a-HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY I N THE ISOLATED PERFUSED RAT KIDNEY. 8. Thomas, E. Spencer, University of Arkansas Medical Center, Little Rock, AR, and Children’s Hospital, San Francisco, CA

765.

A NOVEL DIHYDROXYLATED METABOLITE OF VITAMIN D2 WITH ONE HYDROXY GROUP AT C-25 AND THE OTHER AT C-2 OR C-4 ON THE A-RING. G. Reddy, K. Tserng, Women and Infants Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI, and VA Medical Center, CWRU, Cleveland, OH

766.

SERUM 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D2 LEVELS ARE TWO TIMES HIGHER THAN SERUM 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 LEVELS IN VITAMIN D-DEFICIENT RATS, DOSED ACUTELY WITH EQUAL AMOUNTS OF VITAMIN D, A N D D,. C. Reddy, R. Ray, M. Holick, Women and Infants Hospital, Brown University, Providence, RI, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, M A

767.

24,25,28-TRIHYDROXYVlTAMlN D2 AND 24,25,26-TRIHYDROXYVlTAMlN D2: THEIR PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLE. C. Reddy, R. Ray, M. Holick, Women and Infants Hospital and Brown University, Providence, RI, and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, M A

768.

1 ,25(OH),D, AUGMENTS IL-1 RECEPTOR EXPRESSION BY AMURINETCELL LINE. D. Lacey, 1. Chappel, 1. Erdmann, The Jewish Hospital at Washington University, St. Louis, MO -S67-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

769.

SUBMITOCHONDRIAL PARTICLES FROM CHICK KIDNEY: UTILIZATION TO ASSAY 25-OH-D,-1 -HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY A N D I N WESTERN ANALYSIS USING ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE 1-HY DROXYLASE. C. Dutta, E. Luntao, N. Cunningham, H. Henry, University of California, Riverside, CA

770.

EARLY EFFECTS OF 1,25(OH), VITAMIN D, A N D PHORBOL ESTERS ON THE EXPRESSION OF CARBONIC ANHYDRASE II IN AVIAN MYELOBLASTOSIS VIRUSTRANSFORMED MYELOBLASTS. A. lomri, A. Billecocq, R. Baron, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

771.

GLUCOCORTICOIDS DECREASE VITAMIN D RECEPTOR NUMBER BY DECREASING VITAMIN D RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION. M. Codschalk, 1. Levy, R. Downs, Ir., McGuire VA Medical Center, and Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA

772.

BONE VITAMIN D METABOLITES IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH SUBCAPITAL FRACTURE OF THE FEMUR. C. Lidor, P. Sagiv, T. Hallel, 5. Edelstein, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot and Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba, Israel

773.

SERUM IONIZED CALCIUM, ALONG WITH PHOSPHORUS A N D PARATHYROID HORMONE, REGULATES THE PLASMA lr25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D LEVELS IN NORMAL WOMEN. B. Dawson-Hughes, 5. Harris, C. Dallal, USDA Human Nutritional Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, M A

774.

CALCIUM RETENTION FRACTION AND NET RETAINED CALCIUM EXHIBIT SEASONAL VARIATION IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN. €. Krall, B. Dawson-Hughes, USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, M A

775.

MILD VITAMIN D DEFICIENCY AND SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN NURSING HOME PATIENTS RECEIVING ADEQUATE VITAMIN D INTAKE. C. McMurtry, 5. Young, R. Adler, R. Downs, McGuire VA Medical Center, and Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA

776.

PGE2 EFFECTS CAN BE TRANSDUCED THROUGH NON CAMP DEPENDENT PATHWAYS. 1. Rubin, L. Titus, M. Nanes, B. Catherwood, VA Medical Center and Emory University, Atlanta, GA

777.

LOW FEMORAL DENSITY IN YOUNG MEN: EVIDENCE FOR AN AGE AND GENDER SPECIFIC HIGH BONE TURNOVER STATE. 5. Sherman, C. Cundberg, B. Hollis, C. Plato, T. Roy, 1. Tobin, NIA, NIH, Baltimore, MD, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, and Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston,

sc

778.

VITAMIN D REPLETION IN SUN-DEPRIVED ELDERLY. F. Cloth,). Tobin, 5. Sherman, B. Hollis, C. Cundberg, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and NINNIH, Baltimore, MD, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, and Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

779.

DIETARY PHOSPHORUS RESTRICTION UPREGULATES INTESTINAL BUT NOT RENAL 1,25-(OH), VITAMIN D RECEPTOR CONCENTRATION I N THE RAT. 1. COff, R. Horst, T. Reinhardt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA

468-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

780.

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF INTESTINAL CYTOSOL 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D,-RECEPTOR OCCUPANCY. R. Horst, 1. Reinhardt, /. Coff, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA

781.

REGULATION OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, RECEPTOR A N D ITS MESSENGER RNA BY PARATHYROID HORMONE. 1. Reinhardt, R. Horst, 1. Coff, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, Ames, IA

782.

VITAMIN D RECEPTOR KINETIC CHANGES PERSIST DURING DRUG THERAPY OF ADJUVANT-INDUCED ARTHRITIS IN RATS. C. Langman, K. Ford, S. Paulson, Childrens Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

783.

GLUCOCORTICOID REPRESSION OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, INDUCTION OF THE HUMAN OSTEOCALCIN GENE PROMOTER IS RELIEVED BY THE ANTIGLUCOCORTICOID RU486. N . Morrison, j. Eisman, Garvin Institute of Medical Research, St. Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia

784.

LOSS OF GROWTH INHIBITORY INFLUENCE OF 1,25 DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 IN A KERATINOCYTE MODEL OF TUMOR CELL PROGRESSION. M. Sebag, /. Henderson, /. Rhim, R. Kremer, D. Goltzman, McGill University and Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada and National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

785.

THE EFFECT OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D, ON OSSEOUS TISSUE MODELING OF FETAL METATARSALS CULTURED IN SERUM-FREE MEDIA. C. Bagi, S. Miller, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

786.

MODULATION OF 1,25-DIHYDROXYVlTAMIN D3 RESPONSES IN OSTEOBLASTLIKE CELLS BY PARATHYROID HORMONE: A LOCAL REGULATORY MECHANISM. 1. van Leeuwen, 1. Schilte, /. Birkenhager, H. Pols, Erasrnus University Medical School, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

2 ~ 1 5P.M.4:OO P.M.

OSTEOLYTIC DISORDERS CHAIRPERSONS-Samuel R. Nussbaum Elizabeth Shane

2:15 P.M.

787.

INTERLEUKIN-6CAUSES HYPERCALCEMIA IN VIVO, A N D ENHANCES THE BONE RESORBING POTENCY OF INTERLEUKIN-1 A N D TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR BY TWO ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE IN VITRO. K. Black, G. Mundy, 1. Garrett, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

2:30 P.M

788.

OSTEOCLASTIC MICRORESORPTION AS A CHARACTERISTICFEATURE OF B-CELL MALIGNANCIES OTHER THAN MULTIPLE MYELOMA. 1. Ross;, D. Chappard, C. Alexandre, T. Commes, C. Rodriguez, P. Baldet, R. Bataille, Institute of Cancer, INSERM U291, lmmunorhumatologie and Anatomopathologie and Laboratoire de Biologie du Tissu Osseux, Saint-Etienne, France

2:45 P.M.

789.

EFFECTS OF TREATMENT OF MALIGNANCY-ASSOCIATED HYPERCALCEMIA O N SERUM LEVELS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE. A. Budayr, D. Thiebaud, P. Amman, R. Rizzoli, /. Bonjour, 6. Certz, P. Burckhardt, 6. Halloran, R. Nissenson, C. Strewler, VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, CHUV, Lausanne and University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland, and Merck Sharp & Dohrne, Rahway, NJ -S69-

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30,1990

3:OO P.M.

790.

GALLIUM NITRATE VS. ETIDRONATE FOR ACUTE TREATMENT OF CANCERRELATED HYPERCALCEMIA: A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE-BLIND STUDY. R. Warre//,jr., W. Murphy, P. Schulman, P. O‘Dwyer, Memorial Sloan Kettering, M.D. Anderson Cancer Centers, North Shore University Hospital, Fox Chase Cancer Center, New York, NY, Houston, TX, Manhasset, NY, Philadelphia, PA

3:15 P.M.

791.

MULTINUCLEATED CELLS FORMED IN LONG TERM MARROW CULTURES FROM PAGET’S PATIENTS EXPRESSES VIRAL ANTIGENS. A. Frausto, 8. Mills, F.R. Singer, G. Roodman, University of Southern California, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, and Audie Murphy VA Hospital and University of Texas, San Antonio, TX

3:30 P.M.

792.

EVIDENCE FROM IN SlTU HYBRIDISATION THAT PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE MAY BE DUE TO INFECTION WITH CANINE DISTEMPER VIRUS. M. Gordon, P. Sharpe, D. Anderson, University of Manchester, Hope Hospital, Manchester, UK

3:45 P.M.

793.

IL-6 IS AN AUTOCRINE/PARACRINE FACTOR FOR PAGETIC OSTEOCLASTS. C. Roodman, N. Kurihara, Y. Osaki, F.R. Singer, VA Medical Center and University of Texas, San Antonio, TX, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, and LAC/USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA

4 ~ 1 5P.M.6:15 P.M.

WORKSHOP C-Spanish, Georgian, and Confederate Rooms-Level CALCIFIED TISSUE MATRIX: COMPOSITION A N D REGULATION

7

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31,1990 8:OO A.M.9:00 A.M.

STATE-OF-THE-ART II CHAIRPERSON-Armen

H. Tashjian, Jr.

MOLECULAR GENETICS OF MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA, TYPE II Bruce A.I. Ponder

9:15 A.M.10:15 A.M.

OSTEOBLASTS AND ESTROGEN ACTION CHAIRPERSONSGUYA. Howard Nicola C. Partridge

9:15 A.M.

794.

IDENTIFICATION OF FUNCTIONAL ESTROGEN RECEPTORS IN BONE CELLS BY TRANSFECTION WITH A CAT-REPORTER GENE A N D BY PCR. M. Ernst, A. Schmidt, S. Rutledge, G. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA

9:30 A.M.

795.

17-p ESTRADIOL INHIBITS CYTOKINE INDUCED IL-6 PRODUCTION BY BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS A N D OSTEOBLASTS. C. Cirasole, Y. Sakagami, F. Hustmyer, X. Yu, H. Derrigs, S. Boswell, M. Peacock, C. Boder, S. Manolagas, Indiana University, VA Medical Center, and Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN

9:45 A.M.

796.

ESTROGEN INHIBITION OF OSTEOCALCIN mRNA EXPRESSION OCCURS IN CULTURED RAT OSTEOBLASTS ONLY AFTER FORMATION OF A MINERALIZED EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. M. Aronow, T. Owen, G. Stein, 1. Lian, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, M A

-S70-

FRIDAY, AUGUST 31, 1990

1O:OO A.M.

797.

TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-I BY ESTRADIOL IN OSTEOBLASTS. M. Emst, C. Rodan, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, West Point, PA OSTEOPOROSIS II

10~15A.M.12:15 P.M.

CHAIRPERSONS-J.C. Gallagher Anthony B. Hodsman 10:15 A.M.

798.

IMPAIRED CARBOXYLATION OF CIRCULATING OSTEOCALCIN IN ELDERLY WOMEN. L. Plantalech, M. Cuillaurnont, M. Leclercq, P. Delmas, INSERM U234, and lnstitut Pasteur, Lyon, France

10:30 A.M.

799.

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SERUM 1,25 DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D, AND INTESTINAL VITAMIN D RECEPTOR CONCENTRATIONS IN NORMAL WOMEN: EVIDENCE FOR AGE-RELATED DECREASE IN INTESTINAL RESPONSIVENESS. P. Eberling, M. Sandgren, E. DiMagno, H . DeLuca, 6. Riggs, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, and University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

10:45 A.M.

800.

MORPHOMETRIC DIFFERENCES BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER ILIAC CORTEX IN OSTEOPOROSIS. R. Balena, M. Shih, D. Rao, H . Duncan, A. Parfitt, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI

11 :00 A.M.

801.

OOPHORECTOMY INCREASES AND ESTROGEN DECREASES IL-1, TNFa AND GM-CSF SECRETION FROM HUMAN MONOCYTES. R. Pacific;, E. Puscheck, C. Brown, E . Friedrich, D. Maggio, E. Slatopolsky, L. Avioli, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, and University of Washington, Seattle, WA

11 :15 A.M.

802.

EFFECT OF ESTRONE SULFATE ON BONE MINERAL DENSITY OF THE FEMORAL NECK AND SPINE. j . Gallagher, D. Baylink, Creighton University, Omaha, NE, and VA Hospital, Lorna Linda, CA

11 :30 A.M.

803.

PREDICTION OF RESPONSE TO ESTROGEN THERAPY USING URINE DEXYPYRIDINOLINE. R. Eastell, A. Colwell, A. Assiri, E. Lufkin, R. Russell, 6. Riggs, University of Sheffield, UK, and Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

11 :45 A.M.

804.

1,25 DIHYDROXY VITAMIN D, VS CALCIUM IN THE TREATMENT OF ESTABLISHED POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS. M. Tilyard, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

12:oo Noon

805.

RELATIONSHIP OF DIETARY CALCIUM AND BONE MASS IN TWIN CHILDREN.

1. Miller, C. johnston, Ir., Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN Adjournment

471-

Fifth Annual Meeting of the Adult Bone and Mineral Working Group AUGUST 28,1990 7:OO-9:30 P.M. Satellite Workshop of the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Bone a n d Mineral Research

Six Flags Suites-Level

7

Program

7:OO P.M.7:30 P.M.

Buffet Dinner

7:25 P.M.

INTRODUCTION Robert F. Gagel

7:30 P.M.

HISTORICAL VIGNETTE Frederick S. Kaplan

SCLEROSING BONE DISORDERS CHAIRPERSON-Frederick S. Kaplan 7:40 P.M.

RAISED SERUM LEVELS OF CREATININE KINASE ISOENZYME BB IN AUTOSOMAL DOMINANT OSTEOPETROSIS. 1. Bollerslev, 1. Cram, 5. Antonsen, M. Horder, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark

7:45 P.M.

ATRANSITIONAL FORM OF A HEREDITARY SCLEROTIC BONE DISORDER: A LINK BETWEEN OSTEOMESOPYKNOSIS AND OSTEOPOIKILOSIS?A. Crauer, F. Raue, R. Gagel, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

7:50 P.M.

APPARENT CURE OF PAGET’S DISEASE OF BONE. W.C. Ryan, Rush-PresbyterianSt. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, IL

7:55 P.M.

ENCHONDROMA IN A PATIENT WITH FIBRODYSPLASIA OSSIFICANS PROGRESSIVA: A SPECTRUM OF ENCHONDRAL DYSPLASIA?). Tabas, M. Zasloff, M. Fallon, F. Kaplan, Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, and Jefferson University Hospital, PhiIadel phia, PA

8:OO P.M.

HUMAN CALCITONIN THERAPY CAN ARREST THE PROGRESSION OF SPINAL CORD COMPRESSION IN SPINAL PAGET’S DISEASE. S.1. Wimalawansa, L. Banks, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London, UK

8:05 P.M.8:20 P.M.

DISCUSSlON CALCIOTROPHIC DISORDERS CHAIRPERSON-Robert F. Gagel

8:20 P.M.

PARATHYROID CARCINOMA A N D POLYCYTHEMIA VERA. R. Weinstein, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA

-S72-

8:25 P.M.

HUMORAL HYPERCALCEMIA OF MALIGNANCY CLOSELY RESEMBLING PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM: A CASE FOR TYPE I A N D II CLASSIFICATION? 5. Papapoulos, K. Hoekman, Y. Tjandra, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

8:30 P.M.

ACUTE HEMARTHROSIS AS A PRESENTATION OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM. C. Rosen, University of Main, and St. Joseph Hospital, Bangor, ME

8 ~ 3 5A.M.8 5 0 P.M.

DISCUSSION DEMINERALIZING OR OSTEOMALACIC CONDITIONS CHAIRPERSON-Steven T. Harris

8:50 P.M.

SUCCESSFUL HIGH DOSE CALCIUM TREATMENT OF ALUMINUM-INDUCED METABOLIC BONE DISEASE IN LONG TERM HOME PARENTERAL NUTRITION. C. lidor, 1. Schwartz, U . freund, D. Gazit, Kfar Saba and Tel-Aviv University, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

8:55 P.M.

HORMONAL, METABOLIC, NUTRITIONAL A N D BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISMS FOR STRESS FRACTURE. S. Grimston, 1. Engsberg, D. Hanley, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

9:00 P.M.

SYSTEMIC MASTOCYTOSIS PRESENTING AS ISOLATED OSTEOPOROSIS: RESPONSE T O CROMOLYN SODIUM. D. Axelrod, R. Bressler, D. ludge, R. Gagel, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

9:05 P.M.

ONCOGENOUS OSTEOMALACIA DUE T O A BENIGN MESENCHYMATOUS TUMOR A N D TO A METASTATIC PROSTATIC CARCINOMA: SIMILARITIES, DIFFERENCES A N D RESPONSES T O TREATMENTS. S. Papapoulos, K. Hoekman, V. Papapoulou, University Hospital, Leiden, The Netherlands

9:05 P.M.9:20 P.M.

DISCUSSION

9:20 P.M.

PRESENTATION OF THE BOY FRAME AWARD Adjournment

Abstracts for above program-page S2764278

473-

TUESDAY, AUGUST 28,1990 1

2

ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN-DNA INTERACTIONS IN AN UPSTREAM REGION OF THE RAT a l ( l ) COLLAGEN PROMOTER. M. S. K r m a ' . D. Pavlin D. Rowe and k Univ. of Conn. Health Ctr, Farmington, CT. 06032 As the major protein product of bone cells, type I collagen is expressed in a manner specifically controlled by a host of intrinsic and extrinsic cellular factors. We have previously shown that a 1200 base pair (bp) Xbal/Hindlll fragment (-3521/-2295) augments collagen synthesis up to 7 fold in bone but not fibroblastic cell lines. Seven contiguous subfragments were cloned and used to survey this region by gel mobility shifl assay. The best-defined interactions were observed when nuclear extracts were mixed with the terminal 112 bp Xbal/EcoRI (XE) region. Extracts from confluent cultures of ROS 17/23 cells produced a uniformily strong pair of well retarded complexes. Extracts from rat EL2 and NIH 3T3 fibroblast lines gave similar band patterns that were, respectively, of unequal intensity and delayed mobility. All these interactions were enhanced in the presence of calcium. Binding was effectively abolished by competition with an XE containing fragment and another region 695 bp downstream of XE, but was unaffected by DNA from other regions of the type I collagen gene. Sequence analysis of the downstream competitor revealed a A/T rich region that @ homologous with portions of the XE fragment. Extracts from a confluent culture of fetal rat calvarial osteoblasts closely reproduced the ROS cell pattern, whereas overnight cultures of freshly isolated embryonic chick tendon fibroblasts did not form large complexes. Our results indicate that mesenchymally-derived, type I collagen producing cells do not have the same array of nuclear proteins that bind to the WE region of the type I collagen promoter. Alterations in the type or amount of these factors may account for differences in collagen regulation observed in bone and fibroblastic cells.

D E V E L O P M E N T A L E X P R E S S I O N AND H O R M O N A L REGULATION OF MATRIX GLA PROTEIN (MGP) G E N E EXPRESSION IN M A M M A L I A N O S T E O B L A S T S AND CHONDROCYTES. Dept of Cell Biol , U Mass Med Ctr, Worceslcr, MA 01655 Matrix Gla protein (MGP). a vitamin K dependent protein occurs in many tissues, but accumulates only in the extracellular matrix of bone, cartilage and dentin. We evaluated the developmental expression and vitamin D regulation of MGP gene expression in normal diploid rat osteoblast and cbondrocyte cultures that undergo a maturational sequence reflected by a temporal expression of phenotypic genes related to the formation of mineralized matrix. MGP mRNA i s expressed during proliferation and constitutively expressed throughout the cell cycle in osteoblast cultures. Osteopontin (OP) mRNA is also expressed in proliferating cells and increased 2 fold in G1 of the cell cycle. Following proliferation, MGP mRNA increased during the 30 day culture period to highest expression in mineralized cultures when alkaline phosphatase (AP) and OP mRNA decline. The pattern for MGP and osteocalcin (OC) gene expression were strikingly different. notably OC is not expressed in proliferating cells. In chondrocyte cultures, MGP mRNA is expressed during proliferation (days 6-13). After day 13. type I collagen mRNA increased more than type I1 collagen mRNA at which time MGP increased 3-4 fold. This is in contrast to O P expression which decreased (3-4 fold) after day 13. Therefore, in both chondrocyte and osteoblast cultures. M G P mRNA was increased concomittant with the accumulation of the extracellular collagenous matrix. In both cell types, MGP rnRNA expression was induced 10 fold with the addition of 1.25 (OH)2 vitamin D3, In conclusion the developmental expression of the MGP gene in cultured normal diploid osteoblasts and chondrocytes exhibits a u n i q u e p a t t e r n of expression compared t o other phenotypic markers of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. Our results demonstrate a coordinate expression of MGP with the formation of a type I collagenous matrix.

3

4

TRANSGENIC MOUSE LINE EXPRESSING AN ALPHA l(1)COLLAGEN PROMOTER CONSTRUCT IN A TISSUE SPECIFIC MANNER. Q, Pavlin. S. C lark. H.F. Tho m a B.E. Kream. D.W. Rowe and A. Li c w The University of Connecticut Health Center. Farminaton. " ~ CT. 06032 and Storrs. CT 06268 Earlier reports from our laboratory identified regions within a 3.6 kb promoter fragment which are responsible for tissue-specific and steroid hormonedependent expression of the a l(1) collagen gene (D. Pavlin et al., J Bone Min Res 4:S412. 1989). As a first step in studying these regulatory elements in their in vivo environment, we have produced a transgenic mouse line containing the 3.6 kb promoter fragment fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene. The incorporation of the transgene into the mouse genome was confirmed by dot blot hybridization of tail DNA. CAT expression was assessed in various tissues of the 7 day old progeny of one founder animal and in agematched control non-transgenic animals. Tissue extracts from calvaria, tooth germs, tendon, brain and liver were prepared by homogenization or mincing, followed by three freezelthaw cycles in the CAT-assay extraction buffer. The CAT activity was assayed after determining protein concentration in each extract. The results showed very high levels of marker gene activity in calvaria, tooth germ and tendon, very weak activity in brain and no activity in liver, while none of the extracts from the control animals showed detectable CAT activity. These resuits indicate that the 3.6 kb fragment of the a l(1) collagen promoter contains regulatory elements necessary for its high level tissue specific activity in intact animals. Similar analyses of deletion mutants of this DNA fragment will allow us to confirm in vivo the importance of tissuespecific regulatory DNA sequences which we previously identified using cell culture techniques.

AMINO-TERMINAL SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF PEPnDES GENERATED FROM THE CALCIUM-DEPENDENT ACIDIC PHOSPHOLIPID-BINDING PROTEINS OF MATRIX VESICLES: SEQUENCE HOMOLoGY WITH ANCHORIN CII AM) LIPOCORTIN 11. Liua N. Y.W u and Rov E.Wuthie[. University of South Camlina, Dept. of Chemistry, Columbia. SC 29208. Matrix Vesicles (MV) isolated from avian growth plate cartilage have been show to contain a family of EGTA-extractable proteins which are similar in molecular weight, solubility and Ca*'-dependent phospholipid binding affinity to the annexins. Anncxins are a recently defmed class of proteins which bind to aadic phospholipids in the presence of micromolar levels of calcium. Two of thew proleias, molecular weight 33-kDa and 36-kDa. have bccn purilied from MV and the homogenous proteins have bccn used to prepare mono-spec& polyclonal antibodies in rabbits. Antibodies to the 3 s kDa and the 36-kDa annexin uw-react with proteins present in cultured growth plate chondrocytes, but not in vesicles released into the media by thc cells However. antibodies to the 33-kDa but not the %kDa protein immunorcact with Vesicles isolated from the malrir of mineralizing chondrocyte cultures. Ascorbale, which induces the cultures to mineralize, also increases the level of the 33-kDa annedn in cultured chondroqtes and in MV. Thew data suggest that the 33-kDa annexin may be involved in M V mineralization. Initial attempts to further differentiate between the 33-kDa and the.% kDa MV annexins by amino-terminal sequence analysis were unsuccessful since both proteins appeared to have blocked amino-termini. Sequence data from peptides generated by specif~cchemical cleavage at tryptophan and methionhe residues indicate that the 33-kDa MV annexin is highly homologous to anchorin CII, a protein known to bind type I1 collagen. The initial 12 residucs of the 15-kDa peptide generated from cleavage of the 33kDa annexin at tryptophanyl residues are identical to anchorin CII, while the fust 20 residues of a peptide generated by limited CNBr cleavage of the 33kDa annexin differs from anchorin CII in 4 of 20 residues. By contrast, sequence data obtained from a 14-kDa and a 33-kDa peptide derived from the MkDa annexin indicate that the 36-kDa MV annexin is related to lipocortin 11. a tyrosine kinax substrate. The first 16 amino-terminalresiducs of the 14-kDa peptide are 81% homologous with lipocortin II; the initial 26 residues of the 33-kDa peptide shares 77% homology with lipocortin 11. This is the first report of sequence data obtained from MV proteins. While the 33-kDa and the 36-kDa MV annexin share similar Ca*'dependent acidic phospholipid binding allinities, the sequence data dearly demonstrate distinctions between the proteins. Such differences may also impart explicit biochemical functions to the annedns.

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HUMAN OSTEOPONTIN 2 : EVIDENCE THAT OSTEOPONTIN(S) I S A MllLTI-GENE FAMILY J.M. Kerr. L . W . Fisher. J . D . Termine and N.F. Young, BRB, N I D R , N I H , B e t h e s d a . MD 20892 Osteopontin 1 ( 2 a r , spp-1) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein t h a t has been shown t o enhance c e l l a d h e s i o n o f o s t e o b l a s t s and gingival f i b r o b l a s t s i n v i t r o , presumably v i a a c e l l receptor w i t h a f f i n i t y f o r t h e sequence arg-gly-asp ( R G D ) . By screening a human bone cDNA l i b r a r y w i t h a r a t osteopontin 1 ( O P 1 ) c D N A , a human clone w a s i s o l a t e d which c o n t a i n e d a n open r e a d i n g frame o f 834 nucleotides t h a t vas d i s t i n c t b u t highly homologous t o the osteopontins previously r e p o r t e d f o r human and o t h e r s p e c i e s . Based on t h e deduced p r o t e i n sequence, t h i s unique osteopontin, c a l l e d osteopontin 2 ( O P Z ) , i s 2 7 8 amino a c i d s i n l e n g t h w i t h a hydrophobic s i g n a l peptide sequence of 1 6 amino a c i d s and a p r e d i c t e d molecular weight of 2 9 , 2 8 3 (excluding t h e leader sequence). A comparison of the deduced amino a c i d sequence o f OP2 w i t h previously i d e n t i f i e d o s t e o p o n t i n s i n d i c a t e s conservation o f the RGD c e l l - b i n d i n g domain and polyaspartic a c i d region a s w e l l as c o n s e r v a t i o n o f p o t e n t i a l s i t e s f o r N - and 0 - l i n k e d glycosylation. R e c e n t l y , w e have found e v i d e n c e f o r m u l t i p l e forms o f O P 1 mRNA i n human t i s s u e s . These t w o s p e c i e s o f O P 1 a l o n g w i t h t h e h i g h l y homologous b u t unique OP2 may be the b a s i s f o r t h e m u l t i p l e forms o f o s t e o p o n t i n r e c e n t l y r e p o r t e d i n t h e l i t e r a t u r e . The discovery o f a l t e r n a t i v e forms o f O P 1 a l o n g w i t h a second gene c a l l e d OP2 indicates t h a t o s t e o p o n t i n may e x i s t a s a m u l t i - g e n e f a m i l y .

DNASEQUENCEIN MURME SECRElED PHOSPHOPRCYIEINI (Spq OSIEOPO".2AR) GENE CONFERS RESPONSIVENESS TO 1,2S-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3. M. Noda. R.L. V ' *+ D . T . M + + Merck Sharp & Dohme tsPoint, P A 19486; +NIH, Bethesda. MD 20892; and + Rutgers Univ.. Piscataway, NJ 088%. SPPI (osteopontin/2ar) is one of the abundant noncollagenous proteins in bone matrix. The expression of SSPI ene in osteoblasts is enhanced by 1,2S(OH)2D3 is paper examined the DNA sequence in SPPI gene responsiveness to D3. A series of deletion fragments of 5' flanking region of the SPPI gene was ligated to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, and the plasmid constructs were transfected into rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/23) or murine calvaria-derived osteoblast-like (MC3T3E1) cells. D 3 , enhanced the transient expression of a construct with thf largest upstream fragment, up to 5 fold startin at 10- 'M, and reaching maximum at 10-9M. Further '! deletion of the fragments abolished the response to D3. Synthetic DNA fragments (38bp) corresponding to an upstream region conferred the D3 responsiveness to heterologous promoter in a position-independent manner. This 38bp region of the gene contains two direct repeats of 8 bps and has 11 and 15bp sequences with 80 and 67% homology to the D3 responsive regions in human and rat osteocalcin respectively. The 38bp se uence also congyeeds responsiveness to D 3 to heteroqogous promoter (SV40 promoter, 5-10 fold induction . Similar response to D was observed in both ROS 17)2.8 and MC3T3E1 cells. Gel retardation assay showed the binding of nuclear factor to the 38bp sequence in the presence of D 3 These results indicate that the 38bp DNA sequence in murine SPPI gene is sufficient to confer responsiveness to D3.

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R G D CONTAINING SEQUENCES O F OSTEOPONTIN (RGD-OP) and BSP I1 (RGD-BSP) PRODUCE IMMEDIATE CELL SIGNALS AND AFFECT OSTEOCLAST (OC) ADHESION. A. Teti. P. Ross. A. Mivauchi. S. Teitelbaum. K. Hruska. J. Alvarez*. M. Granol, S. Colucci'. P. Gehron-Robev'. A. Zambonin-Zallone, Institute of Human Anatomy, Bari, Italy, Depts. Medicine & Pathology, Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, M O and NIH. NIDR, Bethesda, MD. The extracellular matrix influences many aspects of cell behavior, probably through signals via integrin-mediated adhesion to the substrate. An a,& integrin using a RGD sequence for substrate binding and localized to the podosome is a candidate integrin for regulation of O C adhesion and bone resorption. We have studied interactions of isolated chicken O C with osteopontin, thromhospondin, and peptides of 18-20 amino acids containing the R G D sequences of osteopontin, and BSP 11. OCs were cultured in rnultiwell plates, coated with the respective peptides. After 1 hour the plates were washed and the numbers of adhering cells were determined. OCs were also cultured on glass coverslips and analyzed for actin filament organization into podosomes. Thrombospondin coated plates demonstrated 100% inhibition of osteoclast adhesion. RGD-OP and RDG-BSP I1 promoted cell adhesion, but cell spreading and podosome formation were 80-100% inhibited. Osteopontin stimulated adhesion and spreading. The RGD-OP and RGD-BSP produced complex multiphasic changes in OC [Ca2'],, representing immediate cell responses to integrin binding. These data indicate that the RGD-OP and RGD-BSP were sufficient to induce immediate cell signals and O C adhesion. However, they were not sufficient for stimulation of cell spreading and podosome formation. Thus, a specific protein conformation beyond the RGD sequence and its flanking amino acids is required to generate the complex signals leading to adhesion, cell spreading, and podosome formation.

CHARACTERIZATION OF A C-CELLSPECIFIC ENHANCER OF CALCITONIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION w e l e e R.V Abruzzese'.

R.F. Gag& Lab of Molecular a n d Cellular Endocrinology.Depts of Medicine and Cell Biology.VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medlclne Houston Tx. 77030 We have utilized DNA transfer techniques to locallze and characterize a C-cell spectfic enhancer of transcriptlon wlthln the 5' flanklng DNA of the human calcitonln gene. A restrlctlon enzyme mcdlated mutagenesls of the calcltonln promoter and 5' flanking DNA revealed that a n enhancer of basal transcrlptlon was located between 1233 bp and 823 bp upstream from the transcriptlon start site of the calcltonln gene The activity of thls enhancer was specific to C-cells Isolated from human and rat medullary thyroid carcinomas. The enhancer was lnactlve In CGRP-producing cells of neuronal origin lC6. from rat glloma). endocrine cells (HIT. from hamster lnsulinomal. fibroblasts (NIH 3T3). and eplthellal cells from cervix (HeLa) and from kldney (CV1). Flne mapping of the enhancer by exonuclease medlated deletlons revealed that it included 2 cis-elements wlthln a segment of 130 bp. A deletion of the upstream element (USE) reduced the actlvlty of the enhancer to 10% that of the "wlldtype". unmutated enhancer. The downstream element (DSE) remalnlng after deletion of USE could still function In a tlssue speciflc manner. to enhance transcrlptlon. However, USE could not functlon [email protected] of the DSE.We studled the blnding pattern of proteins from medullary thyrold carclnoma cells to these elements, by a n electrophoretlc moblllty shlft assay IEMSAI and found that Interaction of protelns with USE occurred only In t h e proximal presence of DSE sequence. However. a C-cell specific Interaction of proteln/s with DSE occurred even In the absence of USE. An examhation of USE revealed that It included two overlapplng E boxes. whlch are potentlal blndlng slte for transcription factors which take part in the tlssue specific expression of the immunoglobulln and Insulin genes. We conclude that: 11 the enhancer of basal transcription of the calcltonln I gene I s functlonal In C-cells. but not In other cells of neuronal or endocrine orlgln; 2) The activity of the calcltonln gene enhancer depends on cooperativlty between 2 adjacent CISelements: the blndlng pattern of protelns to elther one of these elements appears to be cell-speclflc: 3) It is posslble that E-box blndlng proteins take part In the cell spectfic activation of the calcltonln enhancer.

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AMYLIN: A NEW BONE-CONSERVING HORMONE FROM THE PANCREAS: IN VlVO AND IN VITRO STUDIES ON POTENCY AND MODE OF ACTION. M.zalm.a. AM.A. Ghatei. "S. Gilbey. AS, Wimala A Al. Mach- "H.K. D m St. George's Hospital Mcdical School and AHammersmith Hospital. London, UK. Amylin is a new member of the family of peptides encoded by the calcitonin multi-genecomplex. It is a 37 amino acid long polypeptidc that was w c n t l y isolalcd from amyloid deposits of pncmtic islets obtained from type I I diabetics. Suuctwally. the amylin peptides resunble calcitonin and calcitonin genc-related peptide. Our study provides the fint dcmonsuation that amylin has powerful plasma calcium-loweringand ostealast-inhibimy actions. I n vivo hypocalcaemic activity was asSeSsed by measuring pastinption plasma calcium levels in young 50 g rats, as well as post-infusion plasma calcium kvels in adult rabbits. The resorption of conical bone subsuate by frcshly disaggregated rat ostealasts was quantified by scanning elecuon microscopy together with image analysis. Dmt comparison of the hypocalwemic poIcncy and duration of action of synthelic human amylin (synthesizcdand purified in our laboralory)and the IRP f a human calcitonin (NIBSC. Hens.. UK) in the rat and rabbit revealed thatamylin was only 30-fold less povnt than human calcitonin. whilst both peptides followcd the =me timc course. We further examined the action of amylin on the motility of single isolalcd rat ostccchls using time-lapsc vidce and computer-assiskd image analysis. We clearly dcmonsvdted that the peptide selectively mimicked the inhibitory effcct of calcilonin on osteoclast motility (or the Q-effect),but failed lo mimic the effectof calcitonin on ostmclast spread area (or he R-effect) (Zaidi ct al. J. Endocrinol, 1990. In Ress). We also measured cylosolic free calcium levels in single isolated oslecclasls using an indo-I-bascdduaemission microspecmflwrom&c method. Unlike calcitonin which produced a biphasic elevation of cylosolic free calcium. amylin did not elicit an inuaccllular calcium response. It therefore appcars that amylin interacts with a receptor on thc oskoclast, that is distinct from that of calcitonin. Amylin is undoublcdly the most potent noncalcitonin hypocalcaemic peptidc so far identified. Although at present we can only speculate on the possible role of amylin in skeletal homeostasis. it appears that the effcclsof the pcplide on carbohydrate meoblism arc modest. if not physiologically irrelevant (Ghatci ct PI. I. Endocrinol. 124. R9-Rl1. I W ) , and that the profound effccuon calcium meobolism may bc the peptidc's main actions. It is notable that amylin i s as abundant in normal plasma as calcilonin. and these findingstaken together suggesl that amylin is responsible for at kasc some of the plasma ostmclastinhibiting activity formerly auribuled solely to calcitonin. Finally, a posiblc thempcutic role for the peptide can be envisaged in conditions when calcitonin is alrcady effective: hylxrcalcaemia. osteoporosis and Pagel's disease of bone.

CELLSPECIFIC IN VITRO PROCESSING OF HUMAN CAtcITONIN/cGRp PRENlRNk C.J. Cote, S.M.Berget. I.N. Nguyen and R.F. Gagel.. Baylor College of Medicine and VA Medical Center, Houston, TX 77030. The FTemRNA encodlng calcitonin (Cn and calcltonln generelated peptide [CGRP) 1s dlfferentially processed In a tissuespeclfic fashion to Include (produce 0 or exclude [produce CCRPl exon 4. Little Is known about the regulatory mechanisms responslble in thls or the multitude of alternatively processed genes, We have been able reproduce the tissue speclfic RNA processing of radlolabeled transcrlpts (n uifro by utilization of nuclear extracts from cells whlch process the primary transcrlpt to either CT or CGRF'. HeLa cell extract processes the transcrlpt to CT whereas F9 extract results In a CGRP-speciflc spllce. By systematic deletion of sequences from the RNA precursor. we have deflned 3 Important regulatory elements [see diagram). Intron 3 3 1

Region: h i

-3

Reglon 1 includes the first 45 nucleotldes of e m n 4. Deletion of this sequence results in CGRP-speclfic splicing in HeLa cell extract, and does not aITect the CGRP-speclllc spllclng observed in F9 cell extract. This region has been narrowed to a 45 base sequence. We predlct that factors recognlzlng these sequences will play a n important role in the regulation of tissue-specific RNA spllclng.se regulatory declslons. We have also learned that regions 2 and 3. the 3'splice and branch sites for exons 4 and 5. are important in the regulatory process. Replacement of either 3' spllce site with a better 3'splice site sequence resulted In tlssue Independent spllclng to the stronger site. These results lndlcate a complex relationship between the strength of the splice sltes and a specific cis-regulatory element located within the CT exon. However. thls (n uftro spllclng system now provides us with a means of ldentlfylng In greater detail the speclllc RNA regulatory sequences. as well as. the factors whlch bind these sequences.

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CALCITONIN INCREASES TRANSCRIPTION OF HUMAN PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PROTEIN. J.M. Gerardi'. C.C. Eldridae'. and J.D. Zaiac, Lkpanment of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria, 3050, Australia. In order to investigate regulation of transcription of the human PTHrP gene in response to calcitonin. a human lung cancer cell line (BEN) with calcitonin receptors linked to a calcitonin responsive adenylate cyclase and cAMP dependent protein kinase was utilised. Evidence exists that PTHrP secretion by these cells is increased by exposure to calcitonin. BEN cells were transfected by electroporation with KATIOI, a consuuct containing 1100 bp of the human PTHrP gene (from the BamHI site, to immediately upstream of the initiator methionine codon). linked to the coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). This hybrid gene contains two putative promoter elements and 480 bp of upstream DNA. This regulatory region contains consensus sequences for glucoconicoid response elements and SPI binding sites but not for the cAMP response element. After electroporation. cells were exposed to agonist for 48 hr and then harvested. CAT activity in the cell extracts was quantitated using a modification of the standard CAT assay in which chloramphenicol was acetylated with "C-acetyl CoA. Initial experiments have examined the transcriptional response of ITHrP to a number of agonists including dexamethasone, fonkolin, insulin and calcitonin. A very strong and reproducible CAT signal with up to 25% conversion was seen using subconfluent 60mm dishes of BEN cells. Exposure of transfected cells to 10'M salmon calcitonin resulted in an 8 0 6 increase in PTHrP driven CAT expression, whereas preliminary experiments with 10-6M fonkolin showed no effect. As the transfected sequence of the hPTHrP gene contains no recognisable cAMP consensus sequence, this response must either be mediated via a novel cAMP response element or via a mechanism independent of CAMP.We are currently using deletion analysis to identify this calcitonin responsive element and to elucidate this mechanism.

PO'IENllAL ROLE FOR PIH-RELATED PEPTIDE IN EGG CAILTFICA'IlON: THE SnMULAllON OF FIX-RELATED PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS BY THE S11ELL GLAND IS COR-

OVIDUCT. M A . Thiede. R. McKee. W. Grasser and R.M, Merck Sharp & Dohme Res. Labs., West Point, PA 19486 and +Penn. State Univ.. Universitv Park, PA 16802. The production of PTH-RF' by the lactking mammary gland suggests a possible role for the peptide in calcium transport by this tissue. This observation led us to investi ate the e ression of FTH-RP by the avian oviduct since &ring em?ell formation, the shell gland portion of the oviduct transports large quantities of calcium (2.5 gm). In this study, we found that during oviduct development the expression of PTH-RP is localized to the shell gland in pullets as early as 14 wks of a e. Upon reachina e%-laying age ( > 21 wks). levels of PTH-kP mRNA within t e s ell gland increase each time an egg moves down the oviduct and peak as the e enters the tissue (isthmus) which immediately precedes ?!et shell gland. During egg calcification, levels of FTH-RP mRNA are maintained at somewhat lower levels and diminish further following ovi osition Shell gland extracts assayed for adenylate cycfase-stimulating activity were found to contain amounts of PTH-RP bioactivity which correlated with the levels of PTH-RP mRNA. Analysis of shell land mucosal and smooth muscle layers revealed that PTH-RP is almost exclusively a product of the latter. Together, these results demonstrate that the PTH-RP expression is isolated to the shell gland during oviduct development, and that PTH-RP synthesis by this tissue is temporally regulated during the e laying cycle. The correspondence between the increase in h - R P synthesis by the shell gland and the need to derive calcium from bone during the e laying cycle suggests that PTH-RP produced by the shell &nd may be part of the signal for the mobilization of calcium from bone. Since PTH-RP can relax smooth muscle, its nthesis by this tissue also suggests a role for FTH-Rr in shell gland motility, an important parameter of egg calcification.

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INTRAUTERINE OCCUPANCY CONTROLS EXPRESSION OF THE PARATHYROID HORMONE-RELATED PEPTIDE G E N E IN GRAVID RAT MYOMETRIUM. A . G . Daifotis*. E.C. Weir, M.L. Brines*. W.J. Burtis. K . Ikeda. B . E . Orever*. A.E. Broadus and M.A. Thiede, Yale Unversity, New Haven, CT 06510 and Merck, Sharp and Dohme, West Point, PA 19486. The PTH-related peptide (PTHRP) gene has been found t o be widely expressed in both endocrine and nonendocrine t i s s u e s , and mounting evidence suggests t h a t the peptide may have predominantly autocrine o r paracrine actions. Using a combination of Northern b l o t t i n g and RNase protection assays, we i d e n t i f i e d a major peak in PTHRP mRNA expression in r a t uterus during the 48 hours imnediately preceding p a r t u i t i o n , with a rapid decline t o baseline l e v e l s within hours of delivery. A s i m i l a r peak in PTHRP content was found in t i s s u e e x t r a c t s using t h e r a t osteosarcoma (ROS) assay and a two-site IRMA, and preincubation with an anti-PTHRP antiserum r e s u l t e d in a complete The peptide could not be l o s s of ROS a c t i v i t y . detected in t h e peripheral c i r c u l a t i o n o r in uterine vein plasma by IRMA during l a t e g e s t a t i o n . By in s i t u hybridization histochemistry, PTHRP mRNA was localized t o the longitudinal ( o u t e r ) and c i r c u l a r ( i n n e r ) l a y e r s of myometrium but was absent in t h e endometrium. The antepartum r i s e in myometrial PTHRP mRNA was dependent upon i n t r a u t e r i n e occupancy, in t h a t a ) i t was g r e a t l y reduced or absent i n the nongravid uterine horns of animals with a natural o r experimentally-induced u n i l a t e r a l pregnancy; b) i t was uninfluenced by b i l a t e r a l oophorectomy, and c ) i t was exaggerated when gestation was prolonged (and p a r t u i t i o n prevented) by progesterone administration. Placental RNA contained only a f a i n t PTHRP mRNA s i g n a l , and t h i s did not change through g e s t a t i o n . We conclude t h a t t h e PTHRP gene i s expressed in pre-term myometrium as a function of the presence and/or increasing s i z e of t h e fetoplacental u n i t . The PTHRP may play a r o l e in regulating the rhythmicity or force of myometrial contraction in t h e antepartum period.

CHARACTERISTICS OF PARATHYROID HORMONE AND PARATHYROID HORMONE-LIKE PEPTIDE STIMULATED ADENYLATE CYCLASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN KERATINOCYTE CELL LINES. J. Henderson. R. Kremer. J . Rhim*. and D. Goltzman, Depts. of Physiol. and Med., HcGill Univ. h Dept. of Med , Royal Victoria Hosp., Montreal, Canada H3A 1 A l and the National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD 2 0 8 9 2 . Human keratinocytes secrete parathyroid hormone-like peptide (PLP) which may act in an autocrine o r paracrine manner in these cells. We therefore examinrd three human keratinocyte cell lines for PLP/PTIi responsive adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Rhek-l was established as a non-transformed cell line following infection with S V 4 0 . The malignant Rhek-fos and Rhekras lines were established following stable transfection of Rhek-l with either the fos oncogene, encodin[: a nuclear protein, or the ras oncogene, encoding the membrane associated P21 which binds GTP and has intrinsic GTPase activity. Confluent cells were stimulated with 10."- lo-% hPTH(1-34) or hPLP(1-34) or lO-'M forskolin. G protein function was assessed in thr presence o r absence of PTH following pretreatment with maximally stimulating doses of pertussis o r cholera toxin. PLP and PTH produced a dose-dependent stimulation of AC activity in Rhek-l and Rhek-fos cells. with maximally stimulating doses eliciting a 5 - 9 f o l d increase over basal. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin produced a 5 fold increase in this activity. Rhek-ras cells showed no PI.P/PTH stimulated activity in thr presence o r absence of pertussis toxin. Pretreatment with cholera toxin stimulated basal AC activity 6 3 % - 7 5 % of that stimulated by lO-'M forskolin in Rhek-1 and Rhek-fos but only 31% in Rhek-ras cells. These findings indicate that both established and fos transformed human keratinocytes have PLP/PTH responsive AC activity, that. both GI and Gi are coupled to this activity, and that. transformation with the ras oncogene is associatrd with a defect in the PTH/PLP-responsive AC activity. The site of this defect appears to reside at the Keceptoland/or at the post-receptor G protein level.

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PARATHYROID HORMONE - RELATED PEPTIDE: A ROLE IN FETAL DEVELOPMENT. IC. Moniz*. *P.Quirke*, 'A. Malik*. 'A. H. Chatoo*. 3J. T. Triffitt,, and IP. B. J. Bunon'. (Intr. by J. N. Beresford), 'Kings College Hospital, London,UK, ZLeeds University, Lecds.UK. and 3MRC Bone Research Laboratory, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford, UK. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is known to mediate hypercalcemia of malignancy. However, it now appears that the peptide possesses a unique spectrum of biological functions distinct from PTH.In normal development the PTHrP gene is widely expressed by many fetal tissues and appears to encode a number of mRNA isoforms in a tissue and developmentally specific fashion. PTHrP distribution was assessed in saggital sections of whole fetal rats aged 13.16.18 and 21 days, using immunocytochemistry and two plyclonal antisera raised against PTHrP (1-34) and (5686) (Gift of Drs. G.V. Segre and H. fippner, Boston). Results were. identical with both antisera. Expression of the peptide appeared to be linked to cellular activity. Epithelia of most major organs was intensely positive, particularly at its critical interface with mesenchyme as in areas of organ remodelling. This was exemplified by the developing skeletal system. Immature mesenchyme passed through a transient phase of positivity prior to forming cartilage, at which stage PTHrP staining was lost. Re-expression did occur in later gestation but only in large mature chondrocytes. In areas of osteoid formation osteoblasts were strongly positive. The pattern of PTHrP localization was strikingly similar to that observed in two ten week old human fetuses. Northern blot analysis (using a synthetic 40-oligomer directed against the coding region of the gene) verified these cellular changes. A 4.8kb mRNA species present in early second trimester human fetal kidney, disappeared by 22 weeks. The pattern of distribution of PTHrP in the fetus was startlingly similar to that of other known growth factors such as TGF-a and p. and c-erbB-2.These data strongly argue that PTHrP is intimately involved in regulating the normal growth and development of the fetus.

SELecTIVE R E l " I o N OF MXBXJLB WI?HIN THE K X E H BJDOF'LASMIC RRl'IcuLlM (rER): AN ULIRASIRUcRlRAL MARKERFURLXFIBXIVE HUl'EIN SIRucIURc. H.E. ~ C r u be r and _ D.L. _ Rimoin. _ _ Medical Genetics-Birth Defects Center and Dept. of Pediatrics, Cedars-Sinni CYTB ~

Medical Center, Los Aneeles, CA

90048

The rER is now recognized as a major orgnnelle responsible for ensuring that improperly folded proteins do not enter the cellular secretory pthway. Structurally abnoxmal proteins are not secreted and either accumulate or are degraded within the rFR cinternae (i.e., undergo "architectural editing"). a i r ultrastmtural studies have identifi d electron dense material accumulated in rER of chondmcytr-s from patients with spndyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SEDI, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, achondrogenesis 11-hypcchondrogenesis and pseldoachondmplasia. In SED, spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and achondrogenesis 11, molevular studies have demonstrated mutations in the type I1 rol1agr.n gene which result in production of stnw:turally ahn o m l type I1 collagen. Thus identification of a,'cunulated mterial in rER may help determine the underlying defect in these skeletal dysplasias and help us understand the subcellular basis of rFR art]itectural editing. Conclusions: 1) Distension of chondrocyte rER with retained mterial may be a USPful m r k e r for disorders that result from deferts in protein structure; 2 ) Chondrocytes from ptients uilh some skeletal dysplasias synthesize str~rturallj abnoxmal proteins which accmulate in diluted rER as a result of rER editing functions: 3 ) Such skeletal dysplasias deserve study for identifirat ion of the retained material as a pointer towards determination of underlying molecular defects.

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REGULATION OF OSTEOBLAST CYTOKINE SECRETION BY TGFP. M.Horowitz. J. Phillips* and M. Centrelh Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510; St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, (3and the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT 06032. Activated osteoblasts secrete a genetically determined set of cytokines that includes GM-CSF, M-CSF. and IL-6. but little is known ahout the control of their synthesis or secretion. TGFP is a potent regulator of various bone cell related activities, including inhibition of bone resorption and bifunctional effects on osteoblast replication. In the present studies we wished to determine whether TGFP could regulate cytokine secretion by osteoblasts. Primary fetal rat osteoblasts were prepared by sequential collagenase digestion of parietal bones. Cells from fractions 3-5 were seeded at low density ([email protected]/cm2) and grown to confluence. The monolayers were washed and cultured with either PTH (0.0220nM) or LPS ( I pg-10 pg/ml). with or without TGFP-1 (400 pM) for 48 hrs. The conditioned medium was recovered and tested for the presence of cytokines. In some experiments cells were exposed to TGFP for 2 hrs.. washed, and treated with PTH or LPS. Results from these studies indicate: 1) TGFP alone at all concentrations tested fails to induce cytokine secretion; 2) LPS synergizes with TGFP for the production of GM-CSF and IL-6 but not for M-CSF; 3) PTH synergizes with TGFP for the production of IL-6; 4) pretreatment of the osteoblasts with TGFP primes them for response to either PTH or LPS. The increase in cytokine release cannot he accounted for bv ...-,the mitoeenic effect of TGW.

BASIC FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR (bFGF) ENHANCES THE CAPACITY OF RAT STROMAL BONE MARROW CELLS TO FOW MINERALIZED BONE-LIKE TISSUE IN CULTURE. S . Pitaru, S . Kotev-Emeth*, D. Noff*, N . Savion*, Goldschleger Sch. Dent. Med., and Goldschleger Eye Res. I n s t . , Sackler Fac. Med., T e l Aviv Univ., I s r a e l . Rat stromal bone marrow c e l l s were shown t o produce mineralized bone-like t i s s u e (MBT i n c u l t u r e i n t h e presence of dexamethasone (10-3-10-8 M) , vitamin C ( 5 0 )Ig/ml) and S g l y c e r o p h o s p h a t e ( 1 0 mM). Addition of 3 n g l m l of bFGF enhanced MBT f o r n a t i o n by 40 times a f t e r 21 c u l t u r e days. To c h a r a c t e r i z e t h e e f f e c t of bFGF on MBT formation, 3H-Tdr and 3H-proline cor o r a t i o n , a l k a l i n e phosphastase a c t i v i t y (Alp), ha' d e p o s i t s and MBT development were a s s e s s e d gvery 3rd day i n bFGF-treated and c o n t r o l c u l t u r e s . H-Tdr incorporation increased steeply in the treated c u l t u r e s compared with c o n t r o l s a t day 4 , peaked on day 11 ( 8 times higher than c o n t r o l s ) and A1P i n the t r e a t e d c u l t u r e s then declined sharply. increased sharply on day 5 , l e v e l e d o f f on day 7 and emained a t l e v e l s 10 times higher than c o n t r o l s . SH-proline incorporation increased gradually in both bFGF-treated and c o n t r o l c u l t u r e s u n t i l day 11 and then increased sharply i n t r e a t e d c u l t u r e s t o levels higher 3 times than c o n t r o l s . 45Ca* d e p o s i t s and MBT formation s t a r t e d on day 11 a d 12 r e s p e c t i v e l y i n a l l c u l t u r e s , but r a t e s of 25Ca* d e p o s i t s and MBT formation i n bFGF-treated c u l t u r e s were 40 times higher than i n c o n t r o l s . Electron microscopy of treated and c o n t r o l c u l t u r e s revealed t h e formation of a collageneous mineralized matrix l i n e d by o s t e o b l a s t - l i k e c e l l s and comprising of lacunae populated by o s t e o c y t e - l i k e c e l l s . Infrared spectrophotometry a n a l y s i s i d e n t i f i e d the mineral a s hydroxyapatite. These r e s u l t s i n d i c a t e t h a t bFGF enhances formation of MBT by stromal bone marrow c e l l s i n c u l t u r e by stimulating t h e p r o l i f e r a t i o n and o s t e o g e n i c expression o f t h e s e c e l l s .

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We can conclude from these studies that TGFP primes osteoblasts to respond to a second signal. This priming results in a synergistic release of some but not all osteoblast cytokines. Our results suggest that TGFP is a potent regulator of osteoblast cytokine secretion via a previously unrecognized interaction with two known osteotropic molecules, PTH and LPS.

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EFFECTS O F INTERLEUKIN-1 ON ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLISM IN HUMAN OSTEOI3LASTIC CELLS., W. Zhnng

EFFECTS O F OSTEOCALCIN O N PROLIFERATION AND DIFFERENTIATION O F PUTATIVE OSTEOCLAST PROGENITORS F R O M MURINE LONG-TERM BONE MARROW CULTURES * d J.Glow& Brigham and Women's Hosp., Boston, and U. Mass Med Center, Worcester, MA Osteocalcin (OC)is a bone-specific. vitamin D-regulated. and vitamin K-dependent calcium binding protein. We have proposed that OC may function as a matrix signal in t k recruitment and differentiation of osteoclasts. This is a study to determine the osteoclastic potential of a subpopulation of bone marrow cells and whether OC influences their differentiation. Long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) were established from C57B1/6J mice according to the methods of Greenberger. Non-adherent cells from 3 to 9-week old LTBMCs were culturcd as monolayers in 8-chambered Permanox (R) slides in either a-MEM or in 10% L-cellwith 2% heat-inactivated horse Serum (d) conditioned RPMI medium in a-MEM with 2% heat-inactivated horse Serum (L2), with or without 5 U/ml rM GM-CSF 2 1.2xlO-6 M rat OC. Proliferation was assessed after 1 and 2 weeks with Chemicon's M l T (tetrazolium) colorimeaic assay; multinuclearity and tamate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity were measured after 2 weeks. We used a Nikon microscope with a photomultiplier tube, computer, and Phoscan software to quantify TRAP reaction product in the stained cultures. Seeded cells did not proliferate in 02 medium, but were stimulated by L2, LZffiM, or a2+GM. OC did not affect proliferation, with or without GM-CSF. in either a 2 or L2 media. GM-+OC increased multinucleation in either L2 or d.In L2 media, with the microphotometric assay, there was more TRAP (p

1990 program & abstracts. Twelfth annual meeting of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Atlanta, Georgia, August 28-31, 1990.

PROGRAM Twelfth Annual Meeting of The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel ATLANTA, GEORGIA AUGUST 28-3 1, 199...
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